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Ailurophile
June 26th, 2016, 02:16 PM
I have decided I am going to be cutting my hair to around collarbone length (currently just past bra-strap length), partly for the fact that I am going to be busy to the end of this year and partly for the fact that my hair ends are just down right scraggily (partly because I want short hair again:laugh:). I cut from hips to maybe arm-pit length(:confused:) back in November because of my terrible ends (Also, I just wanted a change for once!;)), hoping that would be the end of them (have had long hair for most of my life and this has never been an issue) but they seem to be back!!! I am hoping, now that I am actually taking care of my hair, my ends won't get bad again. Do you guys have any tips/advice on how to avoid thinning/split/just scraggly ends, and how to maintain good hair health?
(I would still be cutting my hair if I had fabulous ends, this is just something I want to avoid in the future!)

lapushka
June 26th, 2016, 02:25 PM
Seems like you've made up your mind and it's more of a thing of wanting short hair rather than keeping ends healthy. Fairytale ends *are* healthy. ;)

gthlvrmx
June 26th, 2016, 02:37 PM
It's good to know that thinner ends doesn't always means its unhealthy. It's actually normal and expected as your hair grows longer. The longer it gets, the less hairs there will be that are at those long lengths. If my memory is correct, a part of that is because of the whole hair shedding and cycle from when it starts in the follicles then goes into the phases (telophase, anagen, I honestly don't remember them too well!). Your individual hairs are all shedding and growing at different times so when you let your hair grow for a while, you'll get what people call around here "fairy tale ends".

If you want, you can do microtrimming. It's helpful for letting the slow growing hairs catch up to your ends making your hair appear thicker.

Night_Kitten
June 26th, 2016, 02:53 PM
In general, keeping your hair away from potential harm (getting caught under bag straps / between your back and the chair / in necklaces or earrings / in snaggy or damaging hair accessories etc...) will help avoid damage. As your hair grows longer, keeping it contained in protective hair-styles (buns, braids) will help to reduce tangles and avoid mechanical damage.
Also keeping it contained while you sleep (a braid, a snood / silk scarf or any other way to prevent rubbing and tangling) should help reduce damage.
If your hair "likes" oils, oiling the bottom half of the hair a little bit can help prevent dryness and tangles... Also silicones in hair-care products (conditioner or leave-in) can help temporarily patch up existing damage thus reducing tangles and further mechanical damage to the hair shaft (but that can also result in build-up and not all hair types "like" silicones, so you'll have to experiment and see how your hair reacts...)
If your hair is more prone to damage, it may be you'll need to do microtrims (very small trims) every couple of months to keep the ends "fresh" and damage-free (that's another thing you'll need to experiment with, as some people can grow their hair for years without trimming and have fabulous damage-free ends, while others need to trim regularly to keep a healthy hemline)
Heat-styling and chemicals (such as hair-dye) will also cause damage, so better to minimize or if possible avoid those completely...

Horrorpops
June 26th, 2016, 08:04 PM
I have had so many problems with dry, damaged ends but what's made the most difference for me is braiding my hair every night and wearing it up in a bun or braided during the day. Each night before braiding I put a tiny bit of oil over the ends and so by wash day (3 or 4 days) the ends are just starting to feel greasy (on a similar level to the roots).

I've been doing this routine for the last 3 months and my ends have improved so much in their texture, they feel a lot more soft, silky and hydrated.

It's sad not to wear my hair down all the time and this probably isn't for everyone but maybe it could help you :o

Ailurophile
June 27th, 2016, 02:48 AM
I have had so many problems with dry, damaged ends but what's made the most difference for me is braiding my hair every night and wearing it up in a bun or braided during the day. Each night before braiding I put a tiny bit of oil over the ends and so by wash day (3 or 4 days) the ends are just starting to feel greasy (on a similar level to the roots).

I've been doing this routine for the last 3 months and my ends have improved so much in their texture, they feel a lot more soft, silky and hydrated.

It's sad not to wear my hair down all the time and this probably isn't for everyone but maybe it could help you :o
What kind of oil do you find works best? I've been experimenting with oils over night, but I am quite scared to put too much on!


In general, keeping your hair away from potential harm (getting caught under bag straps / between your back and the chair / in necklaces or earrings / in snaggy or damaging hair accessories etc...) will help avoid damage. As your hair grows longer, keeping it contained in protective hair-styles (buns, braids) will help to reduce tangles and avoid mechanical damage.
Also keeping it contained while you sleep (a braid, a snood / silk scarf or any other way to prevent rubbing and tangling) should help reduce damage.
If your hair "likes" oils, oiling the bottom half of the hair a little bit can help prevent dryness and tangles... Also silicones in hair-care products (conditioner or leave-in) can help temporarily patch up existing damage thus reducing tangles and further mechanical damage to the hair shaft (but that can also result in build-up and not all hair types "like" silicones, so you'll have to experiment and see how your hair reacts...)
If your hair is more prone to damage, it may be you'll need to do microtrims (very small trims) every couple of months to keep the ends "fresh" and damage-free (that's another thing you'll need to experiment with, as some people can grow their hair for years without trimming and have fabulous damage-free ends, while others need to trim regularly to keep a healthy hemline)
Heat-styling and chemicals (such as hair-dye) will also cause damage, so better to minimize or if possible avoid those completely...
These are good tips. Thank you!


It's good to know that thinner ends doesn't always means its unhealthy. It's actually normal and expected as your hair grows longer. The longer it gets, the less hairs there will be that are at those long lengths. If my memory is correct, a part of that is because of the whole hair shedding and cycle from when it starts in the follicles then goes into the phases (telophase, anagen, I honestly don't remember them too well!). Your individual hairs are all shedding and growing at different times so when you let your hair grow for a while, you'll get what people call around here "fairy tale ends".

If you want, you can do microtrimming. It's helpful for letting the slow growing hairs catch up to your ends making your hair appear thicker.
My ends seem to be a new addition though, so that's what I would like to avoid! I have tried microtrimming before once or twice so I might try it more often and see if it helps! :)


Seems like you've made up your mind and it's more of a thing of wanting short hair rather than keeping ends healthy. Fairytale ends *are* healthy. ;)

Haha maybe! The thing is I've had fairytale ends before, but at the moment I do not have them, this is a recent thing and I am kind've confused.:confused:

lapushka
June 27th, 2016, 08:38 AM
About the oils. Just a few drops, spread over the palms of your hands, then smoothed in, works just fine. And that's basically all you need.

Ailurophile
June 27th, 2016, 12:18 PM
About the oils. Just a few drops, spread over the palms of your hands, then smoothed in, works just fine. And that's basically all you need.

Thank you! Would you reccomend a certain kind?

lunalocks
June 27th, 2016, 01:23 PM
I have tried many oils over the years and always come back to generic baby oil.

Anje
June 27th, 2016, 02:25 PM
For softness, I like olive oil the best, but it makes things look oily more than most. (Of course, if you're going to be wearing your hair braided or bunned during the day, that's not actually a problem.) So you really need to limit how much you use! Baby oil makes them kinda slick, but doesn't soak in. Lately I've been using avocado oil, which seems to be nice for some softness and some strength, but I flit between oils without finding a holy grail one.

lapushka
June 27th, 2016, 03:25 PM
Thank you! Would you reccomend a certain kind?

I use MO (baby oil by J&J) myself. After washing, on damp hair, just a few (2/3) drops will do, and I have classic length, so if your hair is shorter, adapt the amount used.

Wendyp
June 27th, 2016, 07:29 PM
I'm totally in love with shea butter, and Nightblooming's formulas. Finding shea butter has allowed me to shampoo (scalp only) 2x a week and I haven't shampooed my length in a couple weeks now. This has really made the difference in how my hair feels, but I'm super new and I'm still figuring out what works for me, I'm obsessed with my ends because of my fine hair. Its definitely routine though I can see that already.

Horrorpops
June 27th, 2016, 09:00 PM
What kind of oil do you find works best? I've been experimenting with oils over night, but I am quite scared to put too much on!

Hey, I use coconut usually, but also olive and rosehip oil as well. :o As Lapushka has said its super important only to use a tiny bit, I heat it up by rubbing my hands together and then smoothing it out over the last 1/3 of my hair. I use a few drops of the olive or rosehip, or a bit of coconut about the size of my pinkie nail.

MINAKO
June 27th, 2016, 09:06 PM
It's easier for me to keep my ends healthy at classic+ than it was at BSL or waist since the shorter lengths are more inviting to wear haor down and also don't offer the same possibilties when it comes to buns etc. Up and out the way to avoid friction is the best thing you can do. no product can cancel out mechanical damage over time anyways.

roseomalley
June 27th, 2016, 09:09 PM
My hair is very fine and thin. It is about an inch above waist. (My avatar is months old). I use Camellia oil on my ends. I wash my hair every three days and apply two drops on the damp ends, (after I have applied a tiny bit of leave-in conditioner). I also try to oil my ends a few hours before shampooing. Having fine, thin hair, I am vigilant about protecting my ends. I wear my hair in a bun or braid everyday. I also bun it at night and sleep on silk pillowcases.