PDA

View Full Version : Humidity



anou
June 21st, 2016, 12:11 AM
I need help with my post-wash hair.

The humidity is close to 100%, which is making it freak out.

I had to cut out conditioner entirely because it was making my hair limp. Now my hair has bounce, but it also turns into a frizzball after air-drying.

I do a little oiling when my hair is damp but it doesnt seem to help much. Any more oil and my hair will look gross.

It kind of calms down a bit by the second day, but on wash day...my hair is just...wild.

:(

lapushka
June 21st, 2016, 04:40 AM
Humectants like glycerine or honey might help. This is how it works:
http://www.curlynikki.com/2012/12/humectants-weather-and-hair-care-part-1.html
http://www.curlynikki.com/2012/12/humectants-weather-and-hair-care-part-2.html

ephemeri
June 21st, 2016, 06:02 AM
I live in a humid area in the summer and have had to change my routine recently because of high humidity. If you read the articles that lapuschka linked (which are really great informative articles), they actually say to avoid humectants in high humidity, because for most people it'll just attract more water to your hair, increasing the frizz. Now, as with anything YMMV, but that was the problem I was having so I had to ditch my stylers that were heavy on humectants (just for the season).

What type of oil are you using? I think there are a couple of things you can try. 1. Try a different oil. 2. Try putting the oil on dry hair instead of wet. 3. If all else fails, keep your hair up or braided until the second day so that it can calm down.

Some people have better success sealing their hair with something like a butter, like shea butter. That may also be worth a try. The idea with the oils and butters is that you're sealing the hair shaft so that the transfer of water in or out of your hair to the atmosphere doesn't happen, so that frizz doesn't happen (although this is debated). But it can certainly take some playing around with it to figure out what your hair wants!

Crystawni
June 21st, 2016, 07:31 AM
Humectants are a no-go for me as my hair already retains enough moisture in the constant humidity I live in. Like ephemeri mentioned, I have better luck with applying a smear of a light oil like Argan on dry hair (to lock out any more moisture and smooth the cuticle, which also brings my hair to day 2 silkiness). Applying it to damp hair either doesn't make any difference, or can make my hair limp and/or stringy. Sometimes the ROO (Rinse Out Oil) method linked to in lapushka's signature can keep the ends under control, which means I don't need the smear of dry-hair oil afterwards unless the canopy is snaking to the skies. I also find using a bamboo brush, and/or a wide-toothed sandalwood comb can smooth things, too--but only once my hair is dry. Most of the time, though, I leave things be, air dry it, and just throw it in a bun and forget about it. It calms itself after that as well.

arr
June 21st, 2016, 07:45 AM
We are having some especially humid weather here in Texas lately so I can understand what you are talking about. Here's a few things that help me though it doesn't completely solve the problem.
1. A dehumidifier machine - this may be out of the question for you but if there is any way possible to take the humidity down even just on wash day, it really helps the hair to dry. You wouldn't have to run it all the time. Here in the U.S. they are not expensive. Without the dehumidifier its like my hair will never dry.
2. Cut out humectants. In humid weather they make your hair absorb even more water, making the situation worse.
3. You say you cut out conditioner but I have found that now is the time to bring out the deep conditioning loaded with silicones/oils type of conditioners. Silicones help immensely during humidity. You really want to coat the hair.
4. Oils. What works for me is shampoo hair as you normally do, then apply a deep conditioner with silicones. Rinse. When you get out, make a leave in conditioner of the silicone conditioner mixed with some of your favorite oil and apply it to your hair. Basically you want to do some form of the LOC method. My way is just a suggestion but maybe you would have more success with pre-shampoo oiling or some other way of using oil, but definitely include oil. Also at this time you may want to experiment with silicone serums.
5. Use a blow dryer. This suggestion is more tricky because I see you have curly hair so I don't know how this would work for you, but I find if I blow dry my hair dries smoother than if I let it airdry. I use a low warm setting that is comfortable on my hand skin and point the air down, just finger combing gently as I dry. I think the warm dry heat of the blow dryer really helps to combat the effects of humidity on the hair.
6. Once your hair is mostly dry, put it in a braid, bun or twist of some kind. This helps to "set" it in a more smooth way. This may ruin your curl pattern though so you may want to skip this step.
7. And finally, even after all this my hair is never great on wash day in humid weather. Try to wash when you don't have to look great. You will have to accept the fact that hair is going to be more frizzy and puffy in humid weather. I like to wash nearer the evening time so I don't have to spend the day looking frizzy. By morning it will have calmed down considerably, especially if you've gotten it mostly dry before going to bed.

Wildcat Diva
June 21st, 2016, 09:18 AM
Watching this video kinda makes me wanna spend my money on this product.
http://www.livingproof.com/buy/no-frizz/

lapushka
June 21st, 2016, 09:31 AM
Watching this video kinda makes me wanna spend my money on this product.
http://www.livingproof.com/buy/no-frizz/

Yeah, but they are *so* expensive. :)

Wildcat Diva
June 21st, 2016, 09:40 AM
I'm thinking of just getting the products at the end that do the sealing.
I think that should last me a while. Like maybe the leave in conditioner.

http://www.naturallycurly.com/curlreading/curlykids/a-closer-look-at-living-proof-and-their-nofrizz-polyfluroester/

anou
June 21st, 2016, 10:30 AM
Humectants like glycerine or honey might help. This is how it works:
http://www.curlynikki.com/2012/12/humectants-weather-and-hair-care-part-1.html
http://www.curlynikki.com/2012/12/humectants-weather-and-hair-care-part-2.html

My conditioner contains glycerine. I cut it out based on LHC advice because it was making my hair limp and weird, in the high humidity.


I live in a humid area in the summer and have had to change my routine recently because of high humidity. If you read the articles that lapuschka linked (which are really great informative articles), they actually say to avoid humectants in high humidity, because for most people it'll just attract more water to your hair, increasing the frizz. Now, as with anything YMMV, but that was the problem I was having so I had to ditch my stylers that were heavy on humectants (just for the season).

What type of oil are you using? I think there are a couple of things you can try. 1. Try a different oil. 2. Try putting the oil on dry hair instead of wet. 3. If all else fails, keep your hair up or braided until the second day so that it can calm down.

Some people have better success sealing their hair with something like a butter, like shea butter. That may also be worth a try. The idea with the oils and butters is that you're sealing the hair shaft so that the transfer of water in or out of your hair to the atmosphere doesn't happen, so that frizz doesn't happen (although this is debated). But it can certainly take some playing around with it to figure out what your hair wants!

I use coconut oil/ mineral oil. I have some almond oil lying around. I've never tried a butter on my hair, I've always thought butters would be too much for my hair!


Humectants are a no-go for me as my hair already retains enough moisture in the constant humidity I live in. Like ephemeri mentioned, I have better luck with applying a smear of a light oil like Argan on dry hair (to lock out any more moisture and smooth the cuticle, which also brings my hair to day 2 silkiness). Applying it to damp hair either doesn't make any difference, or can make my hair limp and/or stringy. Sometimes the ROO (Rinse Out Oil) method linked to in lapushka's signature can keep the ends under control, which means I don't need the smear of dry-hair oil afterwards unless the canopy is snaking to the skies. I also find using a bamboo brush, and/or a wide-toothed sandalwood comb can smooth things, too--but only once my hair is dry. Most of the time, though, I leave things be, air dry it, and just throw it in a bun and forget about it. It calms itself after that as well.

I must try this dry oiling thing. Jeez, I never thought hair would need such drastic changes in routine because of the weather changes. :(


We are having some especially humid weather here in Texas lately so I can understand what you are talking about. Here's a few things that help me though it doesn't completely solve the problem.
1. A dehumidifier machine - this may be out of the question for you but if there is any way possible to take the humidity down even just on wash day, it really helps the hair to dry. You wouldn't have to run it all the time. Here in the U.S. they are not expensive. Without the dehumidifier its like my hair will never dry.
2. Cut out humectants. In humid weather they make your hair absorb even more water, making the situation worse.
3. You say you cut out conditioner but I have found that now is the time to bring out the deep conditioning loaded with silicones/oils type of conditioners. Silicones help immensely during humidity. You really want to coat the hair.
4. Oils. What works for me is shampoo hair as you normally do, then apply a deep conditioner with silicones. Rinse. When you get out, make a leave in conditioner of the silicone conditioner mixed with some of your favorite oil and apply it to your hair. Basically you want to do some form of the LOC method. My way is just a suggestion but maybe you would have more success with pre-shampoo oiling or some other way of using oil, but definitely include oil. Also at this time you may want to experiment with silicone serums.
5. Use a blow dryer. This suggestion is more tricky because I see you have curly hair so I don't know how this would work for you, but I find if I blow dry my hair dries smoother than if I let it airdry. I use a low warm setting that is comfortable on my hand skin and point the air down, just finger combing gently as I dry. I think the warm dry heat of the blow dryer really helps to combat the effects of humidity on the hair.
6. Once your hair is mostly dry, put it in a braid, bun or twist of some kind. This helps to "set" it in a more smooth way. This may ruin your curl pattern though so you may want to skip this step.
7. And finally, even after all this my hair is never great on wash day in humid weather. Try to wash when you don't have to look great. You will have to accept the fact that hair is going to be more frizzy and puffy in humid weather. I like to wash nearer the evening time so I don't have to spend the day looking frizzy. By morning it will have calmed down considerably, especially if you've gotten it mostly dry before going to bed.

Dehumidifiers are out of the question for me right now :lol:
Yes, I have cut out humectants. Not using any. Silicones and my hair don't really like each other, unfortunately. They weigh my hair down and kill my wurls.
I can try putting it up, but I've been kind of wanting to let it down/in a half up because my wurls look nice when they're not frizzy :lol: The heatwave is gone, so I am excited about wearing my hair down more often.


Watching this video kinda makes me wanna spend my money on this product.
http://www.livingproof.com/buy/no-frizz/

Oh my god yes. It looks brilliant. I wish my grad-school student income allowed it :lol:
But the article says it is both hydrophobic and lipophobic, which makes me want to ask - how would it wash out of hair?

ephemeri
June 21st, 2016, 10:38 AM
Have you tried layering a gel over oil? It works really really well for me but some people don't like gel.

Wildcat Diva
June 21st, 2016, 11:04 AM
The link I added from Naturally Curly, the addendum in the article says that in an interview with an expert customer service rep says that gentle non sulfate shampoo would get it out.

Nadine <3
June 21st, 2016, 11:07 AM
When it's humid I just wash as normal and then put it in a crazy bun on top of my head. or a braid. I gave up trying to make it do what I want, it's just not worth all the time and effort lol

vampyyri
June 21st, 2016, 11:09 AM
I've been using aloe gel to keep the frizziness at bay lately, and it gives a very light hold as well.

Nadine <3
June 21st, 2016, 11:14 AM
I've been using aloe gel to keep the frizziness at bay lately, and it gives a very light hold as well.

Be careful with that stuff! I tried using it as gel in the humidity and it worked, but it made my hair Really stretchy and gummy after awhile. I know a lot of people love the stuff, but it frightens me when I hear people use it as a gel lol

ephemeri
June 21st, 2016, 06:03 PM
Be careful with that stuff! I tried using it as gel in the humidity and it worked, but it made my hair Really stretchy and gummy after awhile. I know a lot of people love the stuff, but it frightens me when I hear people use it as a gel lol

Do you think it was because of too much moisture?

Some resources say aloe acts like a humectant but I also used it the other day to help de-frizz my hair and it definitely felt smooth and dry, not like other products I have with humectants in them. I wonder if it does a good job at smoothing but then eventually can over-moisturize?

Nadine <3
June 26th, 2016, 05:00 PM
Do you think it was because of too much moisture?

Some resources say aloe acts like a humectant but I also used it the other day to help de-frizz my hair and it definitely felt smooth and dry, not like other products I have with humectants in them. I wonder if it does a good job at smoothing but then eventually can over-moisturize?

It might have been. I used a little dollop everyday for a week to tame frizzies and by the end of the week, I noticed my hair was stretchy and it felt coated and very very tangly. My hair likes other humectants, like honey and even glycerin, but aloe in any form causes my hair to be a brat!

timeschild
June 26th, 2016, 06:24 PM
Have been wondering about this myself. This summer seems to be very humid to me here in Texas. My poor hair frizzes so much.

tigress86
June 27th, 2016, 02:21 AM
OK the humidity right now is just crazy where I live, it is like a steam sauna outside. I have pretty much just given up and will not wear my hair down right now.

anou
June 27th, 2016, 04:36 AM
So I discovered that applying conditioner first and then washing works for me. As in, my hair feels neither dry nor limp. But the frizz is crazy, some of my new growth is forming coils. :lol:

lapushka
June 27th, 2016, 05:59 AM
For me just having switched up the C in LOC, means a lot! I do LCO instead, and use my serum (or oil), but lately more a serum, last. It helps!

anou
June 27th, 2016, 11:00 AM
It seems experimenting is the only way to find out! I cut out conditioner but my hair was getting tangly. So doing the C before the W seems to have solved the problem. My hair has bounce plus no tangles. But I am going to give up on the frizz. I have too much of it and I don't think it can ever be tamed.