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View Full Version : Going natural "fail" / What happened here?!



MINAKO
June 4th, 2016, 04:48 PM
So i was looking for people who intentionally use heat frequently or go back to it to catch some iseful tips for myself as i plan on doing so, probably want to straighten once or twice a month again. Although i hate the labor of it and this voice in my head keeps telling me even tho heat isn't horrible for me it's nice to be lazy and healthiER to stay heat free. Now is it??
So i came across this video where a girl claims that heat has been beneficial for her hair since it is naturally so low in porosity that she has trouble getting any product to penetrate... Unless she uses heat frequently. I don't have trouble with my hair and even tho products need time to penetrate eventually they do. Bit it's hard to tell cause my hair is overconditioned all the time anyways which is nice for doing buns.

the difference is quite dramtic in her case and i'm windering if she actually made a point i was never able to make sense of before.


https://youtu.be/onlODa6zQWg

spidermom
June 4th, 2016, 04:54 PM
It's been interesting to see that what works like magic for one hair type is the worst thing ever for another, as in the example here. Heat styling is terrible for my hair, but it's porous, so maybe that's the difference. If anyone asked me for advice about heat styling, I'd have to say "no, not ever!" because that's my experience.

spidermom
June 4th, 2016, 05:02 PM
Of course, this young lady may be blaming the wrong thing entirely.

Adorkable One
June 4th, 2016, 05:19 PM
Personally, based on that video, I don't understand how heat via a straightener has been beneficial for her. Going natural doesn't mean your hair will look better immediately. If anything, it reveals the ACTUAL condition of your hair, so it may look worse. I think that's more like what she's experiencing. There's also the possibility without the hair being straight, it was more prone to friction and manual damage. So all the preexisting damage from heat styling finally started to show.

I'm just really skeptical of the assumptions she's making. It seems more like confirmation bias. Having said that, I know that low porosity hair benefits from heat, but, I'm skeptical a flat iron is the ideal form of heat.

MINAKO
June 4th, 2016, 05:48 PM
Ardorkable One, but by going natural it just means heat free here, she wasn't chemically straightening before, just frequently using the heat tools. I don't think that this would "mask" the actualy condition of her hair just the texture. What you are probably referring to is people going cone free but she never said she changed her products.
It's remarkably shorter and thinner so breakage due to friction and unmanagable hair is certainly the case, but to that extend? I'm not sure if that can be the inly reason if hair is handled gently. There are many curlies with the same hairtype who even ise bleach and their hair doesn't break like that. I'm skeptical too but on the other hand her assumption is logical to a certain degree.

Spidermom, i exporienced that heat has a minimal drying effect on my hair but nothing a deep conditioning cant fix and my hair is right back to feeling silky. Of course i shouldn't fry the crap out of my hair but i'm actually wondering if it's possible to permanently incorporate in my routine. I mean we use cold rinses to seal the hair shaft so heat used right might open it just enough to let product penetrate better on low porosity hair.
I guess i'm willing to expiriment, worst thing that can happen is me being in need for a trim.

MINAKO
June 4th, 2016, 05:52 PM
I just decided i will try a test section on the back of my head and flatiron it after every wash to see how that goes. Sometimes i may not want to do my entire hair or wont have the time but with a test section i can already tell if anything changes for the worse or remains like it is.

spidermom
June 4th, 2016, 06:01 PM
It's true that she didn't mention changing products in this video, but she might have. Also, even if she had continued heat styling, she may have still experienced a lot of breakage. Anyway, it appears that what happened is pretty clear in her mind, and I wish her luck getting it all sorted out so that she gets her hair back.

meteor
June 4th, 2016, 06:09 PM
After watching this video I have a couple thoughts:

1) I hope she sees this thread and if she does, it would be awesome if she could share important details on the changes in her routine: in particular,
- handling - how exactly does she manipulate, wash, detangle, style hair now vs. how she did it during straightening times;
- health? diet? any changes? From the pictures she provided, it looks like her hair might have thinned? I could be totally wrong, and it could just be that her hair just looks thinner only due to loss of curl, but it kind of appears that there may be more to it...
- which section of her hair is natural/virgin? I can't figure out if her hair has any old heat damage accumulated (it looks like it), but she can calculate this herself, assuming hair grows 1/2 '' per month.
- any new products compared to what she used back when she was straightening hair? For example, some naturals ditch silicones and other ingredients, replace gentle shampoos with clay washes, etc. and switch up their products dramatically when they want to go natural... serious changes of product (say, avoiding cones or other ingredients that add elasticity and slip) could be contributing to increased breakage in the long run...


2) Correlation does not equal causation. Yes, it's important to see the timeline, of course, but just because hair's condition got worse now and she stopped using heat some time ago does not automatically mean that heat was the thing kept her hair in good condition. There is nothing in the studies I've read on heat (list of studies (http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=136845&p=3191167&viewfull=1#post3191167)) that would suggest that heat can be beneficial to hair. :hmm: (I did see an interesting study with SEM images that showed how heat can make hair appear shinier, but that was due to damage, in that case: Influence of internal structures of hair fiber on hair appearance. III. Generation of light-scattering factors in hair cuticles and the influence on hair shine: http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.553.9320&rep=rep1&type=pdf, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14528388)
There is also nothing in the studies I've read that suggests that high porosity is a desirable state. For long-term preservation of the fiber, ideal state is to keep hair as intact while growing out as possible. Chipping of cuticles, formation of pores on the surface (i.e. increasing hair's porosity) is a result of normal wear & tear and all sorts of damage and leads to loss of shine, more brittle hair, etc... Yes, increasing porosity makes hair grippy and it makes hair absorb more water, oil and other products, but, in itself, that situation is not better than having that space taken up by organic matter that constitutes hair itself.


My biggest hunch would be that she might be over-manipulating natural hair now that she no longer straightens it. She mentioned that she simply keeps hair in braids under a wig.
1. If she braids too tightly in micro-braids that might cause some breakage (from over-manipulation, excessive dryness, etc). That could also explain the edges issue that she mentioned (pulling on hair, braiding too tightly too close to scalp maybe?)
2. If she keeps hair under wigs and doesn't let the scalp "breathe" enough, there might be a scalp issue (e.g. SD) that could result in thinning if left untreated?

Also, she mentioned that she flat-ironed her hair only every 2-3 weeks or so? That's not so bad actually... I mean, if it's a choice between infrequent heat + leaving hair alone vs. heavy mechanical manipulation every day? :hmm: Hmm, I'd definitely do a cost-benefit analysis of her specific use of heat damage vs. her specific use of mechanical damage and see what gives better results and causes less visible damage. :)

Nique1202
June 4th, 2016, 06:14 PM
Ardorkable One, but by going natural it just means heat free here, she wasn't chemically straightening before, just frequently using the heat tools. I don't think that this would "mask" the actualy condition of her hair just the texture. What you are probably referring to is people going cone free but she never said she changed her products.

With regard to this, heat causes damage over time. Just because you don't have visible damage at your length doesn't mean that it doesn't for other people a lot sooner, especially depending on how much heat they use and how they prepare their hair for it (wet vs dry hair, for example). A lot of people fall into a cycle of heat use because heat damage leads to bad hair condition when it's not straightened, so people think the straightening is "fixing" the problem when it's just making it worse at the root of the problem which, in this case, is the basic protein structure of the hair.

Adorkable One's point, I think, was that maybe the person who made the video had used enough heat on her hair to have caused significant damage that wasn't visible until she stopped heat-styling it, and thus was caught in the heat-use cycle. She would have to wait and grow and trim out the worst of the heat damage before seeing truly improved results in that case, just removing heat for a short period of time wouldn't necessarily improve the condition of the hair at all.

littlestarface
June 4th, 2016, 07:23 PM
I have to use heat to open my cuticle but I only use a heat cap, I cant imagine that a flat iron would be beneficial cuz it's so hot.

Adorkable One
June 4th, 2016, 07:33 PM
With regard to this, heat causes damage over time. Just because you don't have visible damage at your length doesn't mean that it doesn't for other people a lot sooner, especially depending on how much heat they use and how they prepare their hair for it (wet vs dry hair, for example). A lot of people fall into a cycle of heat use because heat damage leads to bad hair condition when it's not straightened, so people think the straightening is "fixing" the problem when it's just making it worse at the root of the problem which, in this case, is the basic protein structure of the hair.

Adorkable One's point, I think, was that maybe the person who made the video had used enough heat on her hair to have caused significant damage that wasn't visible until she stopped heat-styling it, and thus was caught in the heat-use cycle. She would have to wait and grow and trim out the worst of the heat damage before seeing truly improved results in that case, just removing heat for a short period of time wouldn't necessarily improve the condition of the hair at all.


Thank you. Yes, this sums up what I was trying to say. :)

MINAKO
June 4th, 2016, 07:35 PM
Meteor, yes i would like to know too. Whitout more information its impossible to rule out that other factors may have contributed to the damage.. But 4 months is not a long time so i assume it's not health related. She also mentioned that she was not wearing her hair constantly straight before so i guess she at least somewhat knew how to deal with her natural texture as well.
When it comes to mechanical damage i think it's often underrated and heat blown way out of proportion cause it really depends in temperature and time of heat exposure as well.
My texture is way different from hers so its hard to compare but i know people with my texture or slightly curlier who heatstyle and color and their hair looks always healthy, given that its a lot shorter it still seems an ok thing to do.

Niwie i never said heat would possibly improve the condition of hair in general, but i was wondering if it indeed could help for products to penetrate better., especially if it is genetically nonporous but dry at the same time. I totally think that dryness and unmanagability could cause more damage in comparison than heat would by denaturation of some of the protein.

meteor
June 4th, 2016, 07:57 PM
^ I definitely agree that mechanical damage is underrated. :agree:

(For example, one can compromise hair's structure *a lot* by chemical or thermal damage, but I think it still takes actual mechanical forces (e.g. even regular combing, styling, etc) to get it to break or form split ends - but of course, compromised hair will form them faster, more easily.)

Sure, heat makes different ingredients penetrate hair faster or adhere to hair better. :agree: I don't know if it's worth it though... The thing is, hair's cuticle and F-layer (18-MEA) are there to keep hair whole, hydrophobic, protected from environment, etc... I don't really see a point in trying to open cuticles really... :hmm: It only makes sense if you want to make dye molecules penetrate or maybe change the hair's structure (like perms/relaxers, etc...), so alkaline environment or heat, etc can be good in those unusual situations... but I don't see how that's a good thing just for hair fiber's best condition or longevity.

Back to the video... I think the very fact that the lady doesn't have her natural curl pattern on her untouched, un-styled natural hair anymore points out that somehow the curl pattern is no longer visible on the length. :hmm: This suggests to me that her hair has gone though some damage - enough damage that the natural curl doesn't even hold. Maybe she chemically processed her hair in the past (relaxers, keratin straightenings?) or maybe she heat-styled that length many times or maybe bleached and dyed? I don't know what happened, but the fact that her natural texture doesn't hold is a big sign of disulfide bonds being broken (i.e. some damage from the past). It could have been years ago, and just catching up now, but there is something there, IMHO. :flower:

Bergelmir
June 4th, 2016, 09:40 PM
The material from the hair is almost same such as nails but the structure is completly different. The secret to healthy hair will come down to the maintenance of the natural structure a huge margin because this is the key on how the hair is able to maintain a high endurance. Chemical always have a influence, no matter natural or not but the physics and geometry of the hair is playing a even bigger role than most of the people may expect. Not only the heat but even the source can play a role. The sun is doing heat by a radiation which can bleach but it's not critically changing the molecular structure in a way like a dryer and straightener is capable of. Because a dryer, straightener or comparable tool is able to dehydrate the hair in such a critical way that the hair can lose the natural hydrophobic and hygroscopic balance as soon as the cuticle is suffering and as a follow up even the structure below . As a result even the wrong heat can damage hair and not just the raw measurement of the temperature. So i do recommend to be aware of such matters and going as natural as possible and taking this word serious... because there is some meaning to it.

teela1978
June 4th, 2016, 11:03 PM
the woman in the video mentions that all she could do with her hair in it's natural state was to put it up in a poof. I think that's probably the main issue. Repeated tight ponytails in the same spot. Not so good for hair unfortunately :(

MINAKO
June 4th, 2016, 11:40 PM
Meteor, yes she definitely has heat damage, but that doesn't necessary explain her hair falling off in chunks all of a sudden. I think it all comes doen to a handling problem and like teela said the tight ponytail could have been a major issue especially in weakened hair.
It's a good idea in heneral to keep an eye on things, but as for me while i do use high temperature i straightened my hair like 5 times a year maximum. As natural as possible is such an easy generalization to make, i don't roll with it. Now since i reached my length goal i just want to enjoy my hair a bit more. But certainly that doesn't mean i'll put heat on it several times a week.

Bergelmir
June 5th, 2016, 02:04 AM
Not so sure what to contribute in this term because obviously she was using a straightener and probably dryer too and even some tight ponytail and whatelse; i guess it was only a matter of time for her hair to suffer. In your case, yes you might be using a straightener but overall it seems you handle your hair with more care and not sure you use dryer and certainly no ponytail and whatelse. It simply all will add up but maybe you are fine just by straightening it several times a year but to me if i had a really high goal (hair length or health) it would probably not be a option. As for dryness, dryness itself is not damaging but when added together with heat i would feel like playing roulette. Straightening as far as i know, no matter if on wet or dry hair, will excessively remove the internal humidity and probably even cause some denaturation of certain proteins else the straightening would not even work. So i'm not sure what you on about because fact is, yes it is damaging but the damage might be just very minor and it could take many years to actually cause visible effects. This is the risk at least but odds is that you may have "wonder-hairs" able to handle this treatment for near countless years... surely we all have different hair and some certainly are more fortunate than others.

lapushka
June 5th, 2016, 05:12 AM
Two words: heat damage. It is real. It pulls curl from the hair in a very non flattering way and I'm sorry I have to say this. I have no doubts that that's what happened here as well. When you have heat damage, you no doubt also have white dots and terrible breakage, and it goes up to the root because that iron has been all over the place. So that would explain it falling down very well.

luxurioushair
June 5th, 2016, 08:18 AM
In my opinion the girl in the video should never use heat on her hair! Just like me! There is nothing good that heat can do for her hair or mine. It all depends on your hair type. She cannot use heat, but you OP should be able to use heat sometimes with no problems.

spidermom
June 5th, 2016, 08:34 AM
Ah - the ponytail puff. That probably is a huge part of her problem. I've noticed that people who wear ponytails a lot do get breakage around where the pony-tie goes.

MINAKO
June 5th, 2016, 08:57 AM
She might have been doing a little too much and the ponytail was the last thing she she needed, i agree. Sure my own hair isn't completely heat proof, i just didn't push it to the point yet where i expirienced any downsides. I actually wonder how bid the difference between individual hairtypes can be. I'm collecting shed hair which i also could use to expiriment. Would be interesting to see how much and how long it takes to intentionallly destroy a section.
I dont blowdry my hair before straightening, just airdry it and would go in witha dryer in case my roots are still a bit damp before using the iron but that's really it. I do two quick passes per section as i find one slower pass sometimes can leave thise crimps depending on wrist movement. The main reason i usually dont straighten often is that it takes me two hours, so the sheer amount of hair i already have is probably keeping me from ruining it.

meteor
June 5th, 2016, 11:41 AM
I think it all comes doen to a handling problem and like teela said the tight ponytail could have been a major issue especially in weakened hair.
Absolutely! :agree: Rough handling can be a huge problem. Puffs can both pull on scalp hair and expose the ends to the elements too much. She also mentioned braids, and I wonder if she meant those micro-braids or something - those could be problematic as they could produce mechanical damage, too, and even potential for issues with traction alopecia (she mentioned her edges thinning) if the braiding or ponytailing is done way too tightly.


I actually wonder how bid the difference between individual hairtypes can be. I'm collecting shed hair which i also could use to expiriment. Would be interesting to see how much and how long it takes to intentionallly destroy a section.

Sounds great! :thumbsup: If you do this kind of testing, could you please share your results with us, MINAKO, pretty please? :flower: I think it would be extremely useful for many of us here, just to see how damage can accumulate, for example... I think it might be really cool to test if the hair responds better or worse if the same amount of flat-ironing is done in a row, or separated by a week or so, low temp but frequently vs. high temp but infrequently, with oiling vs. without oiling, on clean vs. dirty hair, with or without cones, hydrolyzed proteins, etc etc...

chen bao jun
June 5th, 2016, 02:40 PM
Heat is not 'beneficial' for anybody's hair.

However, some people have very strong hair and can get away with it to a certain amount.

And also, some people have been trained to take care of their hair when it is straightened--and have no idea what to do with it when it is natural, and yes, poorly cared for natural hair can have a LOT of breakage, especially with the afro curly hair types this is true.

I myself went natural back in 2001 from twenty years of chemical straightening and lost hair length and health over the next ten years. My hair broke off due to braidouts (basically, over manipulation to the nth degree for my hairtype) and also due to no knowledge whatsoever about taking care of my hair. I literally did not know how to wash it (my idea was in very hot water, with tons of sulphate shampoo, scrubbing it roughly on the top of my head); I did not know how to detangle (my idea was, to drag an afro pick through all the tangles and ignore the breakage); I did not know how to moisturize it or condition it. Not only did not grow, it broke off from below shoulder to about nape length.

When I had my hair permed, it was usually around APL even when I permed and flat ironed on very high heat regularly.

It would have been easy for me to think that straightening was 'better' for my hair, even chemical straightening. I had longer hair that appeared to be healthier when it was straightened, than it did with the way I thought that 'natural' was. My hair was breaking when it was straightened also, but not as fast, because when my hair was straightened, after the abuse of straightening itself, my hair was not getting further abuse, if that makes sense. I knew how to detangle straightened hair without breaking it off at the ends--because it didn't need much detangling.. My abusive washing techniques didn't matter as much with straightened hair, because though I was creating tangles and roughing my hair up, again, the straightened hair didn't tangle as much.

But when I truly learned about natural hair care hair in 2012 on this site and in other places, like tightlycurly.com, THEN I was able to compare apples to apples, and my hair does a lot better natural. It took more than 4 months to re-learn a lifetime's bad habits, though. It took me a year to learn how take care of my hair properly. This girl hasn't spent enough time to make any judgments yet.

I'm also looking at what she is calling her 'natural' hair and thinking that she has some relaxer in there, either relaxer that she isn't revealing (yes, people do do that-- 'texturize' their hair and then pretend to be' naturally' a looser curl type than they are--but it looks different from the truly natural looser afro curls types, as this does) or else she's got relaxer that hasn't finished growing out yet and she honestly doesn't know it. Or else she has got some pretty severe heat damage. Her hair just, as I said, looks very different than a naturally looser afro curl type does. She's not a 3c--she's somewhere in the type 4's and either relaxed or heat damaged.

And she does not look to me as if she has very strong hair. Her hair looks fine and fragile.

Her hair clearly does need some immediate rescuing. It's impossible to tell what she needs though without further information as to exactly what she is doing (and more information as to the true state of her hair).

spidermom
June 5th, 2016, 02:53 PM
chen bao jun, I've noticed the same in my own hair - that I experience less mechanical damage when I blow-dry it to be straight. In it's natural wavy state, it seems very grabby and tangle prone. It definitely requires a gentler technique to comb and style when I leave it in its natural state, which I do most of the time.

eadwine
June 5th, 2016, 02:55 PM
If you read the reactions to her video, she tells has cut her hair shorter now and seems to be very happy with the result, as shown in a new video. :)

chen bao jun
June 5th, 2016, 02:58 PM
Sorry to write a book, and I got off topic.

To answer the original question, I do think someone with a strong hair type can use heat on their hair if it is healthy, or in fact, even use some chemical processing on their hair if it is healthy and get a texture either more to their liking, or one they have been trained to handle better.

I don't think that a person using heat or chemicals is going to have hair that they can grow to extreme lengths (classic or longer, except in exceptional cases)--but if they are knowledgeable and careful, they can have hair healthy to grow to waist, tailbone, or lengths like that, which is long enough for most of the world (and frankly, long enough for me. I have yet to get there!)

You can look at our Bottle Blonde Grows Long thread, or go over to the LHCF to see how people can grow hair with heat or chemicals to waist length in good condition.

But then there are people who honestly can't use heat or chemicals at all, ever.

I know this because of my mother, who keeps trying. She can use heat on her hair ONCE and it will immediately start breaking off badly. Once, after years of good hair, when she has got to the point of healthy hair. The girl in the video clearly isn't like that and has come to a knowledge of how to use heat and keep some hair, has no idea what to do with her hair without heat and has come to a fallacious conclusion. But it might be easiest for her to go back to using heat, I don't know and wouldn't presume to advise her to keep having natural hair, since she's getting this result.

Bergelmir
June 5th, 2016, 11:01 PM
Well, but you do admit there is still some minor damage and it will not allow for extreme lengths anymore.

"Strong" hair type may not necessarily allow for higher resistance because the amount of fibres may stay the same, it's just higher in diameter (comparable to muscle fibres, more muscles doesn't mean more fibres, but more diameter). Sure, stronger (in diameter) hairs may have higher resistance but at the same time lesser surface area for conditioner. This is probably the main reason why my fine hair can react like crazy to any conditioner and even humidity of the air because there is a lot of surface and the hair will react a lot. So by using the correct conditioner even fine hair may not be a disadvantage and i think even more important is the general quality of the hair and not the raw diameter value. Info: http://www.dralinsyed.com/blog/2015/4/5/the-structure-of-hair-part-3-the-medulla-1

Besides, the strong spot of hair is the adaption and interaction, not sheer strength, else a spider web would beat everything that does exist (with same diameter) but nothing is able to adapt and interact as well such as hairs, thats why a conditioner and correct treatment can be so powerful.

curlylocks85
June 6th, 2016, 08:58 AM
My hair is similar to hers and when I started going without heat my hair looked the same. Until my hair was pure virgin, with no heat or anything like that to cause damage, my hair looked like that. I thought mine was worse without heat, at first, but once, I got all my damaged hair cut off my hair seemed damaged because of the texture difference. I think I have low porosity hair - My hair strands float on water. It takes a lot of conditioner to penetrate my hair, but now with all my damage gone, my hair feels and looks great. I guess it depends on the persons hair and how it reacts to outside stimuli, like heat?

chen bao jun
June 6th, 2016, 12:11 PM
Curlylocks85, I think you hit it on the head. If she truly wants to be natural, she needs some time. A lot more time.

Eadwine, I'm glad to know she's happy.

Bergelmir, I'm not sure exactly what your post was saying (sorry) but I think you were saying both fine and strong hair have advantages? I very much agree with that!

Spidermom, I was unclear--i don't notice less mechanical damage when my hair is straightened--just that I have to use different processes, not to get mechanical damage, with natural hair--and at first I didn't know what those processes were.

For the record, I vastly prefer my hair unstraightened! the different detangling process is not a pain, it's just different. I prefer the look, feel and different ways I can manipulate m hair curly very much--not to speak of the fact that I don't have to be worried about every change in the weather when I'm not straightening my hair.

to be honest though, since being on LHC, I feel I can do either, straightened or unstraightened with a lot more ease and that it's my choice (so long as, as Bergelmer pointed out, I remain aware that extreme lengths will be impossible with straightened, as the damage builds up over time). My husband likes straightened (unfortunately, in my opinion) and I have found I am able to handle that, on occasion without losing lots of my ends, and that my hair still feel soft and nice (though not as nice as it does when natural).

My hair is coarse and heat therefore doesn't fry it off--or at least it takes a lot longer to do that than it does with some other hairtypes. Actually, I had learn all kinds of techniques to actually get heat to DO ANYTHING to my hair. I can straighten and straighten--and its not still not actually straight. uber-resistant.

I once heard coarse vs. fine hair compared to tights vs. pantyhose. Yeah, you can wreck the tights (and you will eventually), but it takes a lot more time and effort than it does with silky pantyhose. That's pretty much how my hair is. My hair also has a quality of looking nice when damaged also which is both a blessing and curse. I had all kinds of trouble convincing people it was damaged when it was in like, terrible, terrible shape. the problem with that is that you think, oh, its not bad and then damage it worse, while someone whose hair was showing the problems faster would know it was time to quit.

luxurioushair
June 6th, 2016, 12:31 PM
I once heard coarse vs. fine hair compared to tights vs. pantyhose. Yeah, you can wreck the tights (and you will eventually), but it takes a lot more time and effort than it does with silky pantyhose. That's pretty much how my hair is. My hair also has a quality of looking nice when damaged also which is both a blessing and curse. I had all kinds of trouble convincing people it was damaged when it was in like, terrible, terrible shape. the problem with that is that you think, oh, its not bad and then damage it worse, while someone whose hair was showing the problems faster would know it was time to quit.
This is it exactly! For example, what you (Chen Bao Jun) can do with your hair, I absolutely cannot do. This is something a lot of girls need to understand. You know there are these rare girls on Youtube who relax and straighten the hell out of their hair, and still end up with thick, long hair in a decent length of time. So other girls look at that extraordinary 1%, and believe they can do the same. Hence most girls "failing" at their relaxed journey or heat training endeavours. They shouldn't be relaxing or straightening in the first place, not everyone's hair can survive that stuff. Just because the girl with coarse 3a hair can relax/straighten her hair doesn't mean everybody can. Like you pointed out, coarse vs fine is very important. A Youtuber like NaturallyHigh (https://www.youtube.com/user/ashababe56)is able to flat iron her coarse 4C hair every few months. If I try that stunt, my growth rate will stall and my hair will start to break. Even though my hair is also 4C.

chen bao jun
June 6th, 2016, 04:40 PM
Yeah, LuxuriousHair, it is so wise to know our own hair and what it can and can't do.

and curl pattern is the least of it.

You tube is a great blessing in many ways. It gives many of us the courage to ditch hairdressers and take over our own hair care, which is wonderful (and of course LHC helps with this too. No offense to the great hairdressers on LHC intended).

However, I think Youtube is also a curse since people look at another person based on ONE characteristic of the person's hair and feel that they will be able to do exactly as that person does. and a lot of people on youtube are, I think, outliers. They get away with stuff that the rest of us do not.

I'm glad the girl in that video has found a solution.

I personally am continuing with no heat. Even when you can get away with some heat and some chemicals, its not a good thing for your hair, IMHO.

(sidenote: Glad my hair is coarse, becasue it retains well, which is good--it grows SO slowly. The retention makes up for that a bit. Wish my hair was fine though, whenever I feel fine hair. Mine is now softer feeling--but never actually soft.)