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View Full Version : Help for Receding Hairliine!



marla
March 19th, 2016, 10:03 PM
I have been following LHC principles for several years now and have developed a much nicer mane of hair, i.e. thicker, longer, healthier. However I caught a glimpse of my profile in a video today and am appalled at how much my hairline has receded over the years! Does anyone have tips on how to coax new growth in this area? This is making me look much older than I am and feel!

Silverbrumby
March 20th, 2016, 01:13 AM
You could try biotin or biosil. I found it helped at my temples. I also use an electric dermal stamp. I use that for excessive shedding and restoration of age related hair thinning.

Wusel
March 20th, 2016, 03:57 AM
I also use an electric dermal stamp. I use that for excessive shedding and restoration of age related hair thinning.

I've googled it and found it on amazon... Looks a bit scary... Does it really help? How do you use it on hair?

Arctic
March 20th, 2016, 03:58 AM
Many people find castor oil, especially Jamaican black castor oil, massaged regularly into thinning areas helps re-grow hair. Of course it doesn't work for everybody, and many people have scalps that don't like oils (may irritate or cause excess shedding).

Essential oils, especially blends of oils known to stimulate hair growth are also popular. They are usually mixed in base oil (which has the same possible problems I mentioned above), but they can also be mixed with aloe vera gel or even in your face moisturizer.

Caffeine rinses and monistat treatments seem to work for some.

Massages maybe too.

Correct your diet, if there is something to correct. I am not against supplementing, but it's always better to avoid mega dosages, and if possible, work with nutritionist/doctor to actually see whether you have deficiencies. (Unfortunately they rarely seem to do other nutrient related tests than iron, B12 and D.)

There are, in addition to common vitamins and minerals, supplements like MSM, diatomaceous earth, Viviscal, Priorin...

Then there are medications for hair loss.

And don't forget to avoid hairstyles that put pressure on the hairline hairs.

You will find info on these all if you google a bit around the forum (and internet).


First step would be to figure out what has caused this. If the change happened in few years, it sound very fast speed for so noticeable difference. When you'd know the reason(s) it would be easier to make a plan of attack.

Wusel
March 20th, 2016, 04:06 AM
And don't forget to avoid hairstyles that put pressure on the hairline hairs.



How much pressure is too much pressure? I have my bangs braided back now and in a bun. I didn't pull it back very tightly, just braided... Is this too much? Is it better to leave bangs hang down? Because when I put them back it's against their growth direction... Is this too much already? What do you think?

Wusel
March 20th, 2016, 04:18 AM
This is interesting.
http://stylecaster.com/beauty/wearing-your-hair-up-damaging-your-hair/
So... parting too tightly is bad?

Arctic
March 20th, 2016, 04:32 AM
How much pressure is too much pressure? I have my bangs braided back now and in a bun. I didn't pull it back very tightly, just braided... Is this too much? Is it better to leave bangs hang down? Because when I put them back it's against their growth direction... Is this too much already? What do you think?

It means very tight updos and braids. Like very tight cornrows that are left for a long time, and scraped back ballerina buns. Also when hair is very heavy (long and/or thick) even a looser updo might put pressure at the hairline. So taking advantage of multiple buns, and sectioned updos, and starting updo with a halfup are all good ways or reducing the weight. Also the good old "change your hair styles and placements" is a good strategy so the hair/scalp is not always stressed at same spots.

Wusel
March 20th, 2016, 04:42 AM
It means very tigh updos and braids. Like very tight cornrows that are left for a long time, and scraped back ballerina buns. Also when hair is very heavy (long and/or thick) even a looser updo might put pressure at the hairline. So taking advantage of multiple buns, and sectioned updos, and starting updo with a halfup are all good ways or reducing the weight. Also the good old "change your hair styles and placements" is a good strategy so the hair/scalp is not always stressed at same spots.

This is my problem. My hair is at BSL already so heavy that my bun feels like there's a cat sitting/hanging on my head. Therefore I change styles multiple times a day but I've read here that so much manipulation is bad for the strands and can cause splits... So, I'm in a difficult situation to find out what's best... My buns pull almost always when I make them with all hair...Or they start pulling after a while and I get headaches... :shrug:

lapushka
March 20th, 2016, 05:38 AM
How much pressure is too much pressure? I have my bangs braided back now and in a bun. I didn't pull it back very tightly, just braided... Is this too much? Is it better to leave bangs hang down? Because when I put them back it's against their growth direction... Is this too much already? What do you think?

Wusel, I could only comfortably bun my hair at waist/hip as a iii, so if you are trying to bun before that, I'd say you are putting in your buns too tightly. If you have to pull to get it to work, it's no good.

I wore a peacock twist all the way from shoulder/APL to waist/hip, and folded it under when the tail became too long. I can't stand too much pulling and having to redo your style multiple times is a sign that it is NOT comfy.

ChloeDharma
March 20th, 2016, 07:36 AM
Do you know what has caused this? Is it hair styles pulling on the front? Have you had health problems? Extreme stress? Poor diet? Does your scalp seem healthy? Finding out what has caused it would be the key to treating it. Hormones are of course another area to look at.

Emu oil is said to be particularly good for regrowing hair at the front, I don't know why but that seems to be commonly reported.
There are a number of herbs, oils and essential oils that are said to encourage growth though. It would be hard to give a comprehensive list from memory but as well as the ones suggested above (I use JBCO and like it) I would suggest looking at
Bhringraj
Brahmi
Fenugreek seed (methi)
Neem
Rosemary
Peppermint
Ginger
Mustard oil
Curry leaf
Olive oil
Cayenne
Nettle
Burdock

I'm sure there are others but quite a few there have a long history of use for hair loss and growth so it would be worth taking a look at them and seeing if any appeal.

marla
March 20th, 2016, 08:10 AM
Thanks for all the responses. I do wear my hair in a ponytail to work out but I am mindful not to make it too tight. I take biotin daily and my diet is good. In fact what I think most helped my hair grow healthier was increasing protein intake. As a vegetarian I was unaware at how deficient I was. I started supplementing a few years ago and it made a difference. Unfortunately I think this hairline thing is probably due to aging.

I have a bottle of Chrome Dome (essential oils) that I used to use years ago mixed with Jojoba. I guess I could try that, although I'm not sure if it will be too greasy at the hairline. Castor oil seems to have helped with eyebrows, I might try that too but I imagine the same oiliness problem. I have used Monistat occasionally over the years. I know this treatment will take months to achieve a difference so I am trying to find out what is the best thing to try as it will take a while to see a noticeable difference.

Wusel
March 20th, 2016, 08:16 AM
Thanks for all the responses. I do wear my hair in a ponytail to work out but I am mindful not to make it too tight. I take biotin daily and my diet is good. In fact what I think most helped my hair grow healthier was increasing protein intake. As a vegetarian I was unaware at how deficient I was. I started supplementing a few years ago and it made a difference. Unfortunately I think this hairline thing is probably due to aging.



I eat 80-100 grams of protein daily and it helped my hair a lot! I eat 4-5 eggs, salmon, nuts, seeds, meat, cheese... Protein is SO important from my own experience.

lapushka
March 20th, 2016, 08:56 AM
I eat 80-100 grams of protein daily and it helped my hair a lot! I eat 4-5 eggs, salmon, nuts, seeds, meat, cheese... Protein is SO important from my own experience.

4-5 eggs a day or a week?

Wusel
March 22nd, 2016, 05:58 PM
4-5 eggs a day or a week?

4-5 eggs per DAY, of course. :) sometimes only 3 when it's the XL ones.
Make my hair shiny and strong. But it's not for everyone's stomach. I'm used to it as I eat so many eggs since years but it's not for everybody.

Isilme
March 22nd, 2016, 06:05 PM
If you're a vegetarian then all kinds of beans are excellent sources of protein. I'm assuming you're female? If not then there is unfortunately not much you can do.

chen bao jun
March 22nd, 2016, 06:14 PM
The first thing anybody with a receding hairline should do is run to the dr and have him or her take blood tests. There are some quite serious diseases that cause thinning hair, foremost is thyroid problems, you want to rule that out.

don't assume that things that do wrong are due to age, this is something I have found out..

Other than that, I think you have basically gotten very good advice.

There is a thread for hairloss somewhere on here that also has good advice and support.

People who are vegetarians often resist hearing that their diet could be causing deficiencies and problems--I am glad that you addressed that. It's possible to eat vegan or vegetarian and be very healthy but it takes some thought and planning to get enough protein, and yes, the first thing that shows you are having deficiencies in diet is hair (and fingernails). Hair loss is also often related to medications. Have you changed anything in that regard recently--or since you have noticed the hair loss? that would most definitely include birth control, which is a common culprit (and it makes sense if you think about it since hair loss is often hormone related and birth control messes with your hormones).

Stress is another culprit for hair loss. Usually shows up 6 months AFTER the stress, so people don't necessarily connect it.

It's always good to be aware of traction alopecia also--I think that's been address pretty well in this thread--other than what's been mentioned, tight cornrowing (and adding extensions, which is more the problem than the cornrows in my view), and ballerina buns brushed back very tightly, take a look at your head gear. Hats can rub your hair line off.

But many freak out about braiding and bunning needlessly. If your braids and buns have been tight enough to remove your hair, they have been painful, hair doesn't come out as easily as all that--unless there is a health problem.