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mermaiden_hair
March 7th, 2016, 12:23 PM
There are so many different oils out there, several that others claim can produce faster, thicker, and fuller hair growth... but which ones should I choose? I'm asking not just for me, but on behalf of my husband, who tells me he is worried about his crown area. (He insists that since he can see scalp there, that he is balding, though I disagree. But I'd rather not argue with him if he is dead set on it.)

I'm thinking of buying coconut oil (Nutiva), since the oil can also be used for many other things besides hair, and it is also good for moisture/protein retention. What says you all? What is your favorite hair oil for growth?

Persiangirl01
March 7th, 2016, 12:36 PM
Hi there! Oil helps protect the hair and make it appear healthy by nourishing it. A reason we think it grows hair is because when we massage the oil in, that act of massaging stimulates the scalp and increases blood flow to that area, which in turn helps promote hair growth. If he is worried that he is seeing his scalp, he really should look in to what the reason for his hair loss could be. It could be telogen effluvium (which starts because of an external factor in most cases, such as stress or medication) or androgenic alopecia (otherwise known as male or female patterned baldness), that it could be and it is best to find out what type it is and then find the correct method of treating it. If he is balding, then he would need more than an oil to stimulate new hair growth.

meteor
March 7th, 2016, 01:00 PM
If your husband is complaining about crown area thinning, my first guess would be to check for male pattern baldness (androgenetic alopecia). If it is MPB, usually a DHT-controlling protocol is needed in those cases, with things like Minoxidil/Rogaine, Finasteride/Propecia and regular washing with ketoconazole shampoo (e.g. Regenepure DR, Nizoral).

Generally speaking, for hair thinning, it's important to diagnose and address and treat the underlying health issue... and then the hair growth should follow. :)


Back to your questions on oils... oils that have a reputation for promoting healthy hair growth are usually anti-fungal (e.g. neem, tea tree) (because fungal overgrowth can slow down growth or cause shedding, if left unattended) or stimulating or both (e.g. peppermint - study: Peppermint Oil Promotes Hair Growth without Toxic Signs - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4289931/).
There are also oils that penetrate hair shaft: coconut, so that's protective for hair and can help reduce hair breakage during washing/grooming/etc - study: Effect of mineral oil, sunflower oil, and coconut oil on prevention of hair damage - http://journal.scconline.org/pdf/cc2003/cc054n02/p00175-p00192.pdf.
Many people also use castor oil for thickening with some anecdotal success, though I haven't seen studies on this.


There was also an interesting study, worth mentioning: Randomized trial of aromatherapy. Successful treatment for alopecia areata. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9828867

Eighty-six patients (diagnosed with alopecia areata) were randomized into 2 groups. The active group massaged essential oils (thyme, rosemary, lavender, and cedarwood) in a mixture of carrier oils (jojoba and grapeseed) into their scalp daily. The control group used only carrier oils for their massage, also daily. (for 7 months)
[...]
Treatment with these essential oils was significantly more effective than treatment with the carrier oil alone.

mermaiden_hair
March 7th, 2016, 02:09 PM
Hi there! Oil helps protect the hair and make it appear healthy by nourishing it. A reason we think it grows hair is because when we massage the oil in, that act of massaging stimulates the scalp and increases blood flow to that area, which in turn helps promote hair growth. If he is worried that he is seeing his scalp, he really should look in to what the reason for his hair loss could be. It could be telogen effluvium (which starts because of an external factor in most cases, such as stress or medication) or androgenic alopecia (otherwise known as male or female patterned baldness), that it could be and it is best to find out what type it is and then find the correct method of treating it. If he is balding, then he would need more than an oil to stimulate new hair growth.


If your husband is complaining about crown area thinning, my first guess would be to check for male pattern baldness (androgenetic alopecia). If it is MPB, usually a DHT-controlling protocol is needed in those cases, with things like Minoxidil/Rogaine, Finasteride/Propecia and regular washing with ketoconazole shampoo (e.g. Regenepure DR, Nizoral).

Generally speaking, for hair thinning, it's important to diagnose and address and treat the underlying health issue... and then the hair growth should follow. :)


Back to your questions on oils... oils that have a reputation for promoting healthy hair growth are usually anti-fungal (e.g. neem, tea tree) (because fungal overgrowth can slow down growth or cause shedding, if left unattended) or stimulating or both (e.g. peppermint - study: Peppermint Oil Promotes Hair Growth without Toxic Signs - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4289931/).
There are also oils that penetrate hair shaft: coconut, so that's protective for hair and can help reduce hair breakage during washing/grooming/etc - study: Effect of mineral oil, sunflower oil, and coconut oil on prevention of hair damage - http://journal.scconline.org/pdf/cc2003/cc054n02/p00175-p00192.pdf.
Many people also use castor oil for thickening with some anecdotal success, though I haven't seen studies on this.


There was also an interesting study, worth mentioning: Randomized trial of aromatherapy. Successful treatment for alopecia areata. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9828867

Thank you so much, you two! I fear that he is suffering from MPB, since he was always that lucky guy who had thick hair. His hair problem started when he moved to Galway in the summer of 2014, and it is then that his hair started thinning and his crown scalp started showing. I really think it is the horrible life quality in Galway (very hard water, bad weather, etc) but I guess maybe it could be an underlying disorder as well. I asked him just now if he has health insurance and if he can afford to see a doctor soon about his scalp health (he is also complaining about bad smells coming from his scalp) and he said yes, so I am glad for that.

In the meanwhile, though, I do just want to use one oil, simply being that we are trying to cut down costs while we look for another place to live. Since different oils do different things, I am having a tough time deciding on a "can-do-all" oil. Sigh! So many choices! :p

I could buy a tea tree shampoo that has natural ingridients to boot, do you guys think that could help to open up the hair follicoles? Please excuse my misspellings tonight. :(

bunneh.
March 7th, 2016, 03:22 PM
I think any kind of oil would work alright. For me personally I use castor oil and extra virgin olive oil mixture (50:50) with tea tree and peppermint essential oils. I apply this mixture every time before washing my hair (once a week) and leave it on for at least a couple of hours or overnight. I part my hair and apply a drop of oil and massage it in gently, part again, apply more oil, part, oil, and so on. After I'm done I turn my head upside down and do inversion method. You massage scalp gently for a couple of minutes while having head turned upside down (facing floor). This has helped me increase growth a bit. Tea tree oil has also helped me get rid of dandruff mostly and prevents new one from forming.

Persiangirl01
March 7th, 2016, 03:32 PM
I suppose that if there is any oil that has many medicinal qualities (and this has been proven), it would have to be tea tree oil. So I imagine shampoo with tea tree extracts will help a great deal. I would still buy tea tree oil and maybe mix it with a cheaper oil of your choice, such as coconut or olive oil, and use it as a treatment 1 or 2 times a week. Try and massage his head as often as possible. I read somewhere once that applying aloe gel to the scalp also helps to unclog follicles. I haven't tried it myself, but it may be worth a try!:agree:

meteor
March 7th, 2016, 03:36 PM
Thank you so much, you two! I fear that he is suffering from MPB, since he was always that lucky guy who had thick hair. His hair problem started when he moved to Galway in the summer of 2014, and it is then that his hair started thinning and his crown scalp started showing. I really think it is the horrible life quality in Galway (very hard water, bad weather, etc) but I guess maybe it could be an underlying disorder as well. I asked him just now if he has health insurance and if he can afford to see a doctor soon about his scalp health (he is also complaining about bad smells coming from his scalp) and he said yes, so I am glad for that.

In the meanwhile, though, I do just want to use one oil, simply being that we are trying to cut down costs while we look for another place to live. Since different oils do different things, I am having a tough time deciding on a "can-do-all" oil. Sigh! So many choices! :p

I could buy a tea tree shampoo that has natural ingridients to boot, do you guys think that could help to open up the hair follicoles? Please excuse my misspellings tonight. :(

MPB is genetic (at least, primarily genetic). If your hubby's father or grandfathers had an issue with that, it could point to genetic component... Going to a doctor would be my first recommendation, and it certainly won't hurt to run standard blood tests and to ask a doctor to look at his scalp.
I know that with androgenetic alopecia, the earlier one starts treatment, the better the chances for regrowth and maintaining fuller hair. It's not easy though. It might be helpful to ask on online forums specifically dealing with MPB for more detailed information, experiences, reviews of products, etc: e.g. hairlosstalk.com, baldtruthtalk.com...

Also, from what you are describing about the scalp (bad smell), I wonder if there could be a dermatological issue going on? :hmm: It might be fungal overgrowth. Malassezia fungus overgrowth can trigger seborrheic dermatitis, for example, and that can lead to thinning in the long run, if left untreated... Just something to be aware of.

I'd definitely highly recommend seeing a doctor to get a diagnosis and treatment options. :flower:

I really hope your hubby's scalp and hair will recover soon! :pray:

Persiangirl01
March 7th, 2016, 03:37 PM
A few more tips that you guys could try: Apple Cider Vinegar (ACV) rinses. It's super cheap to buy ACV and you just mix it in some water and pour it over the scalp. You can either wash it out after a few minutes or, even better, just leave it in. The ACV smell disappears as the hair dries :) ACV has antifungal properties and also helps to restore the natural pH balance of the scalp.

Also keep the hair and scalp protected from the sun, so maybe suggest that he wears a cap if he spends a lot of time in the sun! That's all I can think of for now. I hope it helps!

lapushka
March 7th, 2016, 03:43 PM
If I were you I'd follow meteor's great advice and go see a doctor. It's useless experimenting with stuff when you have no clue what's really going on with his scalp. It needs to be figured out and it's important enough to spend some time and funds on it, spend them preferably on going to the doctor than on tons of perhaps useless products that won't help him in the end.

mermaiden_hair
March 11th, 2016, 02:39 PM
Sorry for the absence, everyone, I was honeymooning in Spain. :o


I think any kind of oil would work alright. For me personally I use castor oil and extra virgin olive oil mixture (50:50) with tea tree and peppermint essential oils. I apply this mixture every time before washing my hair (once a week) and leave it on for at least a couple of hours or overnight. I part my hair and apply a drop of oil and massage it in gently, part again, apply more oil, part, oil, and so on. After I'm done I turn my head upside down and do inversion method. You massage scalp gently for a couple of minutes while having head turned upside down (facing floor). This has helped me increase growth a bit. Tea tree oil has also helped me get rid of dandruff mostly and prevents new one from forming.

I seriously need to try that inversion method as well as the green house effect method. I'll definitely let hubby know about the massaging the scalp; knowing him, he'll make me massage his head for him. :rolleyes:


I suppose that if there is any oil that has many medicinal qualities (and this has been proven), it would have to be tea tree oil. So I imagine shampoo with tea tree extracts will help a great deal. I would still buy tea tree oil and maybe mix it with a cheaper oil of your choice, such as coconut or olive oil, and use it as a treatment 1 or 2 times a week. Try and massage his head as often as possible. I read somewhere once that applying aloe gel to the scalp also helps to unclog follicles. I haven't tried it myself, but it may be worth a try!:agree:

Tea tree oil is amazing. I used to mix it in a conditioner or a low-poo and even put some brown sugar to create a medicinal scalp scrub once a week. It seriously helped with my itchyness/dry scalp issue. I think my issue is coming back, so I need to get my hands on that oil again!


MPB is genetic (at least, primarily genetic). If your hubby's father or grandfathers had an issue with that, it could point to genetic component... Going to a doctor would be my first recommendation, and it certainly won't hurt to run standard blood tests and to ask a doctor to look at his scalp.
I know that with androgenetic alopecia, the earlier one starts treatment, the better the chances for regrowth and maintaining fuller hair. It's not easy though. It might be helpful to ask on online forums specifically dealing with MPB for more detailed information, experiences, reviews of products, etc: e.g. hairlosstalk.com, baldtruthtalk.com...

Also, from what you are describing about the scalp (bad smell), I wonder if there could be a dermatological issue going on? :hmm: It might be fungal overgrowth. Malassezia fungus overgrowth can trigger seborrheic dermatitis, for example, and that can lead to thinning in the long run, if left untreated... Just something to be aware of.

I'd definitely highly recommend seeing a doctor to get a diagnosis and treatment options. :flower:

I really hope your hubby's scalp and hair will recover soon! :pray:

Thank you so much for all of that, the weird thing is that his father ALWAYS had thick, luscious hair, even to his death a couple of years ago. It went grey, sure, but it took a really long time for it to all go grey, and he never suffered from any bald spots. I'm thinking his grandparents are also lucky for having nice hair too. So if anything, I'd say it's a horrible fungus that's feeding onto his head. :agape: Oh god, we really need to see a doctor and this thread proves it in writing. Thank you all so much!


A few more tips that you guys could try: Apple Cider Vinegar (ACV) rinses. It's super cheap to buy ACV and you just mix it in some water and pour it over the scalp. You can either wash it out after a few minutes or, even better, just leave it in. The ACV smell disappears as the hair dries :) ACV has antifungal properties and also helps to restore the natural pH balance of the scalp.

Also keep the hair and scalp protected from the sun, so maybe suggest that he wears a cap if he spends a lot of time in the sun! That's all I can think of for now. I hope it helps!

Oh yes, I am definitely gonna give him some ACV rinses this upcoming week. :o Thanks for reminding me, LOL!


If I were you I'd follow meteor's great advice and go see a doctor. It's useless experimenting with stuff when you have no clue what's really going on with his scalp. It needs to be figured out and it's important enough to spend some time and funds on it, spend them preferably on going to the doctor than on tons of perhaps useless products that won't help him in the end.

Absolutely and if anything, this thread is the proof I needed to convince DH to see a doctor urgently. I don't have a bad smell coming from my head most days, but he sometimes tells me that it would appear and then mysteriously disappear. This mold problem in our house is creeping me out with how it loves to cling onto anything and everything. :(


Thank you all so, so much from the bottom of my heart!

tentaclecat
March 14th, 2016, 07:45 PM
An essential oil like peppermint should always be diluted with a carrier oil. Sweet almond oil is light and won't weigh hair down too much, though I've used straight up olive oil at times for a leave in treatment (before going to hot yoga!). Rosemary is a good oil to try--it promotes circulation in the scalp and can darken/thicken up finer hair. Worth a shot?