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CreatureBailey
January 4th, 2016, 05:34 PM
So I know there's this tangled theory which explains why wires or hair tangle. But is there like...

A mathematical graphic that shows the potential of tendency to tangle depending on factors, and like there would be like a curve in the graphic and it would be like a straight line or a curve from rational expressions or stuff like that and people could see where their hair are located on the Tanglenss Potential Scientific Curve?

Meh. I say that cause my hair tangles a lot.

I also heard that fine hair tangles more. But why? Is it cause since it's fine it's lighter so it moves more?

If not, why? :confused:

AJNinami
January 4th, 2016, 06:55 PM
I don't think so, but maybe you could make one! Tangles depend on how coarse/fine, thick/thin, and healthy/damaged your hair is. The finer, thinner, and more damaged, the more it tangles. (at least as far as I am aware.)

MeAndTheMaz
January 4th, 2016, 08:36 PM
I don't know either, but if there is one with a bell curve, I think I'd be right near the top of it.

Mirabele
January 5th, 2016, 06:05 AM
i don't think it has to do with how fine or coarse hair is, but rather on how slippery it is. i have fine hair, most of my length is damaged because of previuos bleach, hair dryer and frequent shampoo use. i almost don't brush. i don't normally get tangles but my hair is very slipper/silky.

lapushka
January 5th, 2016, 06:26 AM
It all depends, and it depends on multiple factors; is the hair fine, medium, coarse, blunt cut, layered, how long is it, does the person use silicones or no, heavier products (for dry damaged hair) or lighter products.

I always use a sulfate/silicone-free shampoo but a *very* heavy conditioner (for dry, damaged hair), because lengths need moisture. In some this may weigh their hair down, depends on length and texture as well, but for me - this works well.

meteor
January 5th, 2016, 12:17 PM
So I know there's this tangled theory which explains why wires or hair tangle. But is there like...

A mathematical graphic that shows the potential of tendency to tangle depending on factors, and like there would be like a curve in the graphic and it would be like a straight line or a curve from rational expressions or stuff like that and people could see where their hair are located on the Tanglenss Potential Scientific Curve?

I've never seen such a model, but I'd love to check it out if there is one.
However, Jean-Baptiste Masson (physicist at the École Polytechnique in France) apparently built a mathematical model of hair tangling based on 123 straight-haired subjects and 89 curly-haired subjects, with hair combed by 2 hairdressers at specific times. (Counter-intuitively, straight hair produced an average of 5.3 tangles per head and curly hair produced 2.9. Masson concluded that the angle at which two straight hairs meet is the angle most likely to lead to tangling (http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/straight-hair-is-knottier-than-curly-hair/).) I haven't seen the actual study, so can't comment, but if you can access it (it was published in the American Journal of Physics in August 2007), please do share your opinion on it! ;)


Personally, I would imagine there must be a few factors (apart from the obvious things like wind, styling, etc) that contribute to tangleness:

1) smoothness/roughness of cuticles covering hair strands (the puffier, snaggier, the more more potential for tangles);
2) density (the denser, the more strands and surface area, the more potential for tangles);
3) length (the longer, the more surface area, the more potential for tangles);
4) combination of textures (the more multi-textured, the more hair can move or want to curl in different directions, so maybe creating potential for more tangles?);
5) moisture level, oiliness/dryness (the drier and the less conditioned (esp. with oils & cones), the more potential for frizz, snag-prone surface and tangles);
6) virgin state/damage (the more damage (for example after alkaline treatments, which lift up the cuticle), the less smooth and intact the surface and the more potential for tangles);
7) straightness/curl/wave structure (would like to know more about this factor...);
8 ) fineness/thickness (coarseness) of individual strands (not sure about this one either, maybe finer hair is more floaty, moves more or gets caught in more things instead of easily sliding, and so more tangle-prone? :hmm: I don't know)

CreatureBailey
January 5th, 2016, 03:30 PM
This study is very interesting :O

Wildcat Diva
January 5th, 2016, 07:44 PM
Do I get something if I volunteer for you to study the incredible tangliness? A prize maybe?