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View Full Version : Can you restore your hair to how it was when you were little?



Fluffy01
November 1st, 2015, 08:45 AM
I've noticed children have the most beautiful hair.....my two in particular....biased mom here lol.

I would love for my hair to be like that again but even if I don't dye it it never would look that way.

Has anyone successfully restored their hair to that baby softness and natural beauty?

lapushka
November 1st, 2015, 08:49 AM
I grew to classic from age 5/6 to about 10/11 and I am now 43 with classic length hair again - it is possible! I can't say it's the same, because I had 1b/c hair as a child, and puberty made that 2b/c. But my hair is all virgin now and so... I think it's as close as can be!

Fluffy01
November 1st, 2015, 08:59 AM
I grew to classic from age 5/6 to about 10/11 and I am now 43 with classic length hair again - it is possible! I can't say it's the same, because I had 1b/c hair as a child, and puberty made that 2b/c. But my hair is all virgin now and so... I think it's as close as can be!

That's awesome!

I was also thinking the products we use might have something to do with it. Like I use only an organic baby shampoo once a week on my daughters hair with an organic detangler. No heat drying. Etc.

Hairkay
November 1st, 2015, 09:01 AM
That's awesome!

I was also thinking the products we use might have something to do with it. Like I use only an organic baby shampoo once a week on my daughters hair with an organic detangler. No heat drying. Etc.

You're right about that.

Fluffy01
November 1st, 2015, 09:05 AM
Truthfully I am considering a natural gel for her curls but I'm starting to worry about ruining the perfection that is her hair. She has golden brown hair with the tips flecked with natural light brown almost blonde highlights. It's stunning. Sigh.

luxurioushair
November 1st, 2015, 09:11 AM
I figure little children are like that because they haven't been exposed to the elements, chemical-laden foods and stress for long enough. We probably can't have baby hair and baby skin simply because we've been around too long and been exposed to too much.

missblueeyes
November 1st, 2015, 09:15 AM
I think the most important factor is that children's hair hasn't been chemically altered yet for the most part. I had beautiful, natural hip or bcl length hair before I started dyeing it and I'm positive I can get it back now that I stopped all chemical alterations. :) Children don't style their hair and don't fuss with it, that's a huge part, too. Less touching = less damage.

lapushka
November 1st, 2015, 09:25 AM
You might admire your child's hair now, but prepare yourself for what she might be going to do to it once she's a teen - totally different ballgame! And you have 0 say in it, I'm afraid. My mom had no say in it when I crimped my hair to death twice a week after washing it!

gossamer
November 1st, 2015, 09:30 AM
Let me add that children's bodies haven't begun to produce the hormones that our adult bodies have flowing through them.

Think about how your hair changed during puberty (mine started going darker and thicker) and then might even have changed further during/after pregnancies. Post-menopausal women will probably be able to chime in with their hair changes based on hormonal changes yet again.

I'm writing from the biological perspective of a woman, but I imagine that some of our male users can chime in about pre-puberty hair vs. post puberty hair characteristics and changes again as they age.

Alex Lou
November 1st, 2015, 12:26 PM
For a lot of us, hormones change our hair over time. I can never get my childhood hair back because the virgin texture now is very different from what I had even as a teenager. Not to mention the color...

EdG
November 1st, 2015, 01:04 PM
Let me add that children's bodies haven't begun to produce the hormones that our adult bodies have flowing through them.

Think about how your hair changed during puberty (mine started going darker and thicker) and then might even have changed further during/after pregnancies. Post-menopausal women will probably be able to chime in with their hair changes based on hormonal changes yet again.

I'm writing from the biological perspective of a woman, but I imagine that some of our male users can chime in about pre-puberty hair vs. post puberty hair characteristics and changes again as they age.Exactly.

There is an entire industry built around trying to restore men's hair to pre-adulthood conditions. Fortunately, I haven't been in need of that. Instead, I just have some thinning around the temples, a shorter terminal length, and a Silver Swirl. ;)
Ed

woolyleprechaun
November 1st, 2015, 01:48 PM
I wish...! I had incredibly thick, soft, honey coloured hair as a child. My eldest daughter has the thickest classic length hair I have ever seen (a wrist-thickness plait looks crazy on a teeny six year old). My younger girl still has adorable blonde candyfloss curls.
Aside from the hair choices we make as the years go by, I do think there are other factors at play. Hormones do look like a likely culprit (the beasts).
I think stress is an enormous factor. I have heard it said that hair loss in females has increased along with our pace of life....

yahirwaO.o
November 1st, 2015, 04:48 PM
Exactly.

There is an entire industry built around trying to restore men's hair to pre-adulthood conditions. Fortunately, I haven't been in need of that. Instead, I just have some thinning around the temples, a shorter terminal length, and a Silver Swirl. ;)
Ed

Sir I have to say, I hope when I get your age, my hair looks close to how magnificent mane you have! :o

.... and my hair is silky just like when I was a child. But I had stick straight hair back then, and now 've got some wannabe waves and my roots seem to develop future waves. Which is ok and not as surprising, I live in a wavy-curly family, hair texture changes ovetime etc.

Ingrid
November 1st, 2015, 04:57 PM
Also children's heads are smaller and everyone is born with a set number of hair follicles (that may stop producing hair over age) so naturally most children's hair looks a lot thicker than what we might see on adults.

Christine_O
November 1st, 2015, 05:00 PM
It is natural as the body ages for the hair to change. Looking at my lovely little dog, I am reminded of how normal it is for hair to stiffen and grow sparse with age. The best you can do is take care of what you put into your body and avoid putting chemicals in your hair.
What you do to the hair that has already grown is not going to have any effect on the hair that you will grow later. This is true for both you and your child. Just remember good nutrition, and whatever either of you choose to do with the hair you have will do nothing to the hair you will grow.

LegoCaltrops
November 2nd, 2015, 12:08 PM
My hair is just as soft & silky as it was when I was little. Probably softer as I didn't discover conditioner until I was 14. But it's a lot thinner, and I have darker tones since I got pregnant. And increasing silver...

My daughter has the almost the exact same colour hair as I did, with the same sun ombre effect. Dark toffee underneath, honey on top. She has more red in the sunlight though.

spidermom
November 2nd, 2015, 12:32 PM
We can certainly opt for natural hair and bring out the best in it. I think adult hair is different from child hair, though. For one thing not yet mentioned, small children are not fully into the shed and regrow cycle yet, so they have far fewer fly-aways.

chen bao jun
November 2nd, 2015, 04:09 PM
Well, I did.

My mother is amazed when she sees me since LHC. she always used to tell me that when I was a baby, I had the most beautiful spiral curls, everyone used to call me 'baby Shirley Temple," etc etc. --but that my hair had, sadly, changed as I got older.

It turned out that what had changed was that she started brushing it (death to curls) and that it needs conditioner washing to be moisturized and pretreatments also, to get enough moisture in there. Once it was moisturized again, it turned again in soft curls that naturally spiral. Yay for LHC!

I am one of those people who are apparently not affected by changes in hormones, or not much affected. At least up to this point (ten years out of menopause and puberty didn't do anything to my hair either) of course is something could still change, so I'm not feeling as if I'm out of the woods yet.

Alastríona
November 2nd, 2015, 05:25 PM
I wouldn't want to. My hair was so fine it was a tiny plait, and then when it got cut it was flat to my head. It thickened as I grew older, thank goodness! I'd generally agree with the thought that baby hair is like baby skin though, unexposed to the elements or wear and tear. Now my younger skin, I'd like to restore...

Dommydomdom
November 3rd, 2015, 10:26 AM
I agree with what many people have already said - you may be able to get back to the strength/health you had as a child with careful care and maintenance. But, hormones, chemicals, heat exposure, and many other factors affect our hair in the strangest way. Stress and diet has been a big factor in the way my hair is on any given day. But I believe that the more natural your routine, the closer you will get to that childhood hair.