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Idreamlong
October 26th, 2015, 10:14 AM
As title, I am currently taking Cod liver oil, Sea Kelp & MSM tablets daily, as well as 2 tablespoons of a liquid zinc/iron supplement. Some days, when itís 10pm and I realise Iíve forgotten to take the tablets and have to faff around doing so, I wonder if there is going to be any benefit to taking them anyway. It makes me feel better, Iíve only been taking them for 6 weeks so obviously donít expect to see any results yet.


Has anyone had an increase in growth or an improvement in their hair by taking supplements?

Horrorpops
October 26th, 2015, 10:29 AM
I am very skeptical about supplements being effective for most health things - unless a person has a noted deficiency, is pregnant or mal-absorption problems.

I have a better growth rate now I've stopped taking my biotin, iron, zinc, silica, fishoils and multivitamins! :o Mostly you just excrete the supplements anyway, and some studies have linked vitamin supplements with negative health outcomes.

And thats a lot of money and time for no effects or negative effects - IMO :p

ETA: as long as your diet has sufficient micronutrients in it - but mostly in developed countries with access to such varied foods this isn't a problem. However I actively try to eat a varied nutritious diet with fruit, vege, dairy and oily fish etc.

sweetaj
October 26th, 2015, 10:32 AM
I'm sure results vary by person. From December 2014 to August 2015, my hair grew 2 inches. I started taking biotin in July. Since August 7 until now, my hair has grown about 3 inches (hard to measure with wavy hair). That's the only thing I changed in my daily diet.

Nique1202
October 26th, 2015, 10:39 AM
Unless you have a specific deficiency that's being remedied, then there's no proof that supplements increase hair growth that couldn't be explained by the placebo effect or other factors (wishful thinking, paying closer attention than previously, seasonal shifts in growth pattern, etc) which is why I'm a firm believer in "see your doctor if you think something's wrong, and let them use the tools at their disposal to fix you if there is". Supplementing on your own isn't even always harmless-at-worst, since many brands of supplements don't undergo ANY testing to make sure they've got the right ingredients in them, and some contain things that aren't on the label that could cause allergic reactions. (There was a study released earlier this year about this (http://gizmodo.com/most-store-brand-herbal-supplements-dont-even-contain-t-1683515706).)

Horrorpops
October 26th, 2015, 10:45 AM
Unless you have a specific deficiency that's being remedied, then there's no proof that supplements increase hair growth that couldn't be explained by the placebo effect or other factors (wishful thinking, paying closer attention than previously, seasonal shifts in growth pattern, etc) which is why I'm a firm believer in "see your doctor if you think something's wrong, and let them use the tools at their disposal to fix you if there is". Supplementing on your own isn't even always harmless-at-worst, since many brands of supplements don't undergo ANY testing to make sure they've got the right ingredients in them, and some contain things that aren't on the label that could cause allergic reactions. (There was a study released earlier this year about this (http://gizmodo.com/most-store-brand-herbal-supplements-dont-even-contain-t-1683515706).)

Yes, this too!! :) well said Nique

Knifegill
October 26th, 2015, 10:52 AM
My hair has grown faster since I dropped vitamins. Ironically, I never thought they would be good for me, I just hoped they would make my hair grow faster.

Night_Kitten
October 26th, 2015, 01:32 PM
The results depend on the initial state of your vitamin levels - if you have some deficiencies then supplementing them should definitely have good results on your health (and possibly hair growth), however if you have no vitamin deficiencies it's unlikely the supplements will have a noticeable effect...
However things are more complicated than just the pure physical effect of the vitamins / supplements - if taking the vitamins makes you feel better and feel like you're doing something for your health, it could have a psychological effect and actually improve your physical health (the placebo effect)...

There's no way to say for sure, as it's very individual, so the only way to be sure is to see what happens over the course of several months...


ETA
Nique 1202 has a good point, not all the supplements are necessarily harmless... A negative effect is also possible...

furnival
October 26th, 2015, 04:29 PM
Unless you have a specific deficiency that's being remedied, then there's no proof that supplements increase hair growth that couldn't be explained by the placebo effect or other factors (wishful thinking, paying closer attention than previously, seasonal shifts in growth pattern, etc) which is why I'm a firm believer in "see your doctor if you think something's wrong, and let them use the tools at their disposal to fix you if there is". Supplementing on your own isn't even always harmless-at-worst, since many brands of supplements don't undergo ANY testing to make sure they've got the right ingredients in them, and some contain things that aren't on the label that could cause allergic reactions. (There was a study released earlier this year about this (http://gizmodo.com/most-store-brand-herbal-supplements-dont-even-contain-t-1683515706).)
I'm with you this one.
Certain vitamin deficiencies can cause hair loss, but this does NOT mean that taking more of them than you need will boost growth. If you're healthy and eating a sensible diet you're unlikely to be deficient in vitamins, and taking supplements may result in having higher levels of some vitamins (particularly the ones stored in fat) in your body, which can be harmful.

Are you taking the zinc/iron because you are deficient?

sarahthegemini
October 26th, 2015, 04:40 PM
You should only take supplements if you have an actual deficiency. There is literally no point otherwise.

Ingrid
October 26th, 2015, 05:03 PM
Deficiencies are pretty rare, and not all of them cause hair loss, or slowed growth. Supplementing with iron is pretty dangerous actually since it's toxic to the body so make sure you're not experimenting with it unless you have an actual diagnosed anemia or deficiency, and have regular tests and medical professional supervision.

I was severely iron-deficient for a long period of time (nearly 8 years) due to my inability to handle ingredients in oral iron supplements and vegan diet so when I finally found supplements I could tolerate (and changed my diet) my hair shedding decreased significantly and the quality of hair improved. I'd lost about 6cm in hair circumference prior to taking supplements. However, my hair growth rate did not change with or without supplementation.

juniperjetcat
November 3rd, 2015, 10:52 AM
I am also very skeptical of supplements but as a vegetarian I have to take iron. I have definitely found a difference when I don't use iron in terms of my hair loss. These days I use Biotin and Iron because I was told that Iron is absorbed better when taken with vitamin C or Biotin.

ravenheather
November 5th, 2015, 05:47 PM
My year long stall/shed ended when I began supplementing with vitamin d. Now I grow half an inch a month.

hennalonghair
November 5th, 2015, 06:12 PM
Yes ! (...more letters)

curlylocks85
November 8th, 2015, 09:05 AM
I can only speak for myself and I have had some increase in growth taking some of my supplements. I take Biotin with Keratin and a Hair, Skin and Nail supplement. I believe that taking these supplements has increased my natural growth potential, rather than increasing it on its own. I hope that makes sense?

Happy growing everyone!

lapushka
November 8th, 2015, 09:10 AM
If your bloodwork comes back with zero shortages, there is NO need to supplement.

There is one vitamin I take and that is a multi, and there is one supplement I take and that is a glucosamine/chondroitine (some are + msm) tablet.

My growth rate hasn't changed one bit. It always has been and still is half an inch a month!

daniibee
November 10th, 2015, 03:09 AM
I'm sure results vary by person. From December 2014 to August 2015, my hair grew 2 inches. I started taking biotin in July. Since August 7 until now, my hair has grown about 3 inches (hard to measure with wavy hair). That's the only thing I changed in my daily diet.

I agree. some may work on you but it doesn't for others. So results are not really justifyable I think

AutobotsAttack
November 10th, 2015, 03:27 AM
For me personally, I think everyone's body is vastly different, and reacts to vitamins and supplements differently. Some people have bodies where they have all the nutrition they need, some people's bodies actually need the vitamins, and then there are some folks like me take vitamins and it just racks up more bonus points for me. If I take a vitamin or supplements it just gives my body all the more vitality and springiness. I do eat healthy and exercise and taking vitamins just makes my body and hair all the more happy. And if I don't take them then my body really doesn't care anyways. So I think everyone's body is different and has different reactions to vitamins and supplements.

Sweets
November 10th, 2015, 03:33 AM
You never know until you try, and a self-study is the best way to find out for YOU. Get bloodwork done first to check for deficiencies, and give yourself a year to really try a new regimine, and then go back in your history to check growth rate. It's really quite hard to determine if it helps. A multi-vitamin isn't a bad idea, because it's difficult to get 100% of your RDAs every day with food alone. Most of us don't eat perceftly every single day. A good whole-foods supplement is best for absorption, but they can be expensive.

I personally supplement with D3 (northern climate, not a lot of sun-exposure due to work schedule), biotin (don't get it from diet), and kelp with iodine (worried about wild-caught fish and radioactive-ness). When I was recovering from a long illness (I dropped 1/3 of my body weight) I also supplemented with Floradix, as I had low iron. Sometimes I take a multi, but I don't bother with it most of the time. I manage a casino buffet and get to eat lots of good protein, fruits and veggies 5-10x/wk. I'm very fortunate in that regard, I know that most are not.

I studied Exercise & Wellness at university, so that's where I get my opinions. Everyone's studies will lead them to a different conclusion, and that's ok! Pay attention to how you feel at your best and what makes you feel that way, and keep that up. Mind/body health is just as important - whole health is the key.

Annalouise
November 10th, 2015, 03:11 PM
I have been taking iodine (kelp) (for hypothyroidism) and a multivitamin/mineral (WITH iron) for the last few months and I find that I am shedding less.

Silverbrumby
November 10th, 2015, 03:20 PM
No change in growth rate. I came back very low in Vit. D and Iron. Iron was not a surprise. I supplement with both now. I have less shedding but the 'why' of that is not clear. I'm sure taking supplements is a good idea because I'm short on two things but I don't think it helps growth rate.

I do also take biotin and biosil. Now those two things have dramatically changed my fingernails. From 40 years of soft and peeling nails I now have long, strong non peeling nails. This happened before I took the Vit D. or Iron so that was not related. I took both of those for my hair. Instead I got far less lines on my face and strong nails. It might have helped the hair.

ladycaladium
February 29th, 2016, 05:55 AM
I know this is an older thread

The short answer I think is no. But the long answer is it depends. A supplement when you aren't deficient isn't going to help and may be harmful.

I also would say yes if you are deficient in something it can help. You have to know what you are deficient in and how deficient you are. I was extremely deficient in vitamin D for years. It took at least 6 months to see any improvement. It wasn't so much growth rate as much as less shedding. I was losing so much hair due to the deficiency. So yeah, I saw (and continue to see) improvement, but that is due to having closer to proper levels of vit. D. Basically giving my body what it needs to reach it genetic potential. Having excess of a vitamin isn't going to make it grow faster.

I do take a multivitamin to make sure I'm getting what I need as my diet does range from okay to, um, yeah, not so okay.

I did just start taking a kelp supplement since I've been living in a country without iodinized salt for over two years now and I don't eat most things containing seaweed here (allergic to red and green, not brown - the kelps). However, I mentioned this to my doctor and they are keeping tabs on my blood work.

diddiedaisy
February 29th, 2016, 09:07 AM
Agree with ladycaladium, unless you are deficient it will not increase your growth rate. They can however help with shedding and also with hair health, which will help you retain what you grow. I've taken supplements since starting on here, they have definitely helped with shedding and I hope hair health but that I couldn't swear on, and they have helped my general health (I have absorption issues) so I will continue taking them for that reason alone. My growth rate has remained consistent much to my disappointment, so I presume it grows to its genetic pre-disposition. I'd love to chuck an inch out one month though!!!

RottenMango
May 10th, 2019, 03:08 AM
Growth rates are genetic, but if you eat poorly and are deficient in certain areas, vitamins can help you reach your full growth rate potential. Hair/nail growth are the first things to go when the body is experiencing nutritional deficiencies because the body redirects its stores to the organs that are vital for life. I have a terrible diet. I mostly just eat cheese pizza, bagels with cream cheese, French fries and chicken wings. So, of course I ended up with vitamin deficiencies and anemia. I take a multivitamin, iron and zinc and do notice better hair and nail growth on them. When I was a child and ate very healthily at home, my hair and nails grew rapidly without any supplementation.

Begemot
May 10th, 2019, 03:16 AM
Growth rates are genetic, but if you eat poorly and are deficient in certain areas, vitamins can help you reach your full growth rate potential. Hair/nail growth are the first things to go when the body is experiencing nutritional deficiencies because the body redirects its stores to the organs that are vital for life. I have a terrible diet. I mostly just eat cheese pizza, bagels with cream cheese, French fries and chicken wings. So, of course I ended up with vitamin deficiencies and anemia. I take a multivitamin, iron and zinc and do notice better hair and nail growth on them. When I was a child and ate very healthily at home, my hair and nails grew rapidly without any supplementation.

Well explained! I try to have a good diet (80% "good", 20% "bad") and take supplements but I don't expect more growth. I take them for the quality of my hair.

MusicalSpoons
May 10th, 2019, 12:08 PM
No idea about growth rate but my blood work for most things a couple of years ago came back borderline or low normal, i.e. just about high enough to not be deficient but certainly not optimal. I also don't eat very well due to chronic illness and not being able to make my own meals or even prepare healthy snacks, so I supplement - it's not ideal but it's better than nothing and ending up deficient :shrug:

The only thing I take specifically for hair and nails is silica; about 6 months after starting that I'm finding my nails are better quality. I've taken supplements of Vitamin D and iron on and off since before I found LHC and paid attention to growth rate so I don't know if that's affected.

However I have been shedding less over the last few months, but I don't know if that's due to supplements or routine or just less stress after having to give up work due to illness (sounds like it should be more stressful, but actually a huge relief not having to put my body through that trauma every day and actually start to possibly slightly recover). I wasn't shedding large amounts, certainly no more than the general average - possibly slightly less - but I'm definitely enjoying keeping more of my hair for a bit longer :o

Wusel
May 11th, 2019, 03:27 AM
I take vitamins because I'm on Intermittent Fasting and Ketogenic diet since 2014 (Diabetes cure) and don't think that I get all the vitamins and minerals when I never touch fruit or veg. As for me, supplements make my hair grow faster, up to 3cm per month and when I don't take them it starts shedding.

Dark40
May 11th, 2019, 12:25 PM
I also don't notice a significant difference in supplements. I take them, and the only thing I noticed that they improve the health of my hair. It doesn't speed up my hair growth. But I've noticed within a 3-month period my hair has grown 2 inches! Like, from January to March.

lapushka
May 11th, 2019, 12:31 PM
No idea about growth rate but my blood work for most things a couple of years ago came back borderline or low normal, i.e. just about high enough to not be deficient but certainly not optimal. I also don't eat very well due to chronic illness and not being able to make my own meals or even prepare healthy snacks, so I supplement - it's not ideal but it's better than nothing and ending up deficient :shrug:

The only thing I take specifically for hair and nails is silica; about 6 months after starting that I'm finding my nails are better quality. I've taken supplements of Vitamin D and iron on and off since before I found LHC and paid attention to growth rate so I don't know if that's affected.

However I have been shedding less over the last few months, but I don't know if that's due to supplements or routine or just less stress after having to give up work due to illness (sounds like it should be more stressful, but actually a huge relief not having to put my body through that trauma every day and actually start to possibly slightly recover). I wasn't shedding large amounts, certainly no more than the general average - possibly slightly less - but I'm definitely enjoying keeping more of my hair for a bit longer :o

Try looking into microwaveable meals. There is a big difference among them. Not all of them are decent. I get the ones from Lidl (the Dutch meals). And they are nice. I have to resort to them 3 times out of the week. My parents cook the rest of the time. My mom still helps me get the meals ready, though. I'm not alone in this but at least it saves them cooking all the time for me. I wish I could do it myself, but... I can't. It's not happening. And I have always been a good cook! So it hurts!

I take a multi too, but this mostly because I take anti-seizure meds (have been taking them for severe chronic nerve pain since 2004) and if you take those long-term it is recommended that you supplement with vitamins. I also take vit.D/calcium and something for my joints (chondroÔtine + glucosamine + (MSM)).

My vitamin levels are always OK, but then it is no surprise!

zmirina
May 11th, 2019, 12:51 PM
I've noticed that biotin really helps with shedding, and zinc - with acne stuff in general. Omega3 is great, if my skin starts drying out and flaking. I'm generally very careful about taking supplements

blackgothicdoll
May 11th, 2019, 12:58 PM
I posted in another thread of the same topic about AMDRs, macronutrients and micronutrients, etc. I don't feel like searching for that but the tl;dr was that supplements only help if you are missing something. I have chronic anemia due to heavy blood loss from menses, and have to repeatedly get iron infusions while we're trying to fix the main problem of blood loss. Over the past year that I've been on this regimen, my hair has grown quite a bit faster than it did the years prior. If I had regular iron levels, iron supplements would most likely not effect my hair growth because it is additional nutrients that the body cannot use and doesn't need (re: expensive urine).

So I always suggest tracking your diet to find out what nutrients you are getting enough of and not getting enough of, then supplementing values that fall below the AMDR for your sex and age. In addition or course, having a check-up to verify you are not deficient is very important and for more than just hair.

AmaryllisRed
May 11th, 2019, 01:15 PM
I also don't notice a significant difference in supplements. I take them, and the only thing I noticed that they improve the health of my hair. It doesn't speed up my hair growth. But I've noticed within a 3-month period my hair has grown 2 inches! Like, from January to March.

Wow, 2 more inches? You must be close to hip, right?
Also, I thought that you had said you grew 1.5" per month with supplements. Or do I have you confused with someone else?

MusicalSpoons
May 11th, 2019, 01:34 PM
Try looking into microwaveable meals. There is a big difference among them. Not all of them are decent. I get the ones from Lidl (the Dutch meals). And they are nice. I have to resort to them 3 times out of the week. My parents cook the rest of the time. My mom still helps me get the meals ready, though. I'm not alone in this but at least it saves them cooking all the time for me. I wish I could do it myself, but... I can't. It's not happening. And I have always been a good cook! So it hurts!

I take a multi too, but this mostly because I take anti-seizure meds (have been taking them for severe chronic nerve pain since 2004) and if you take those long-term it is recommended that you supplement with vitamins. I also take vit.D/calcium and something for my joints (chondroÔtine + glucosamine + (MSM)).

My vitamin levels are always OK, but then it is no surprise!

Thanks lapushka :flower: usually Mum cooks for all of us in the evening, and I'm rarely awake long enough to need 2 more meals in the day :laugh: so for me it's usually cereal, dinner, and any snacks. The cereal is very low sugar and I add things like chia seeds, coconut flakes and cacao nibs (mix it up in a big container) so it's not particularly *un*healthy, but it's the snacks where I fall down - some days I don't have the energy to pick grapes off the vine and wash them, or even open a tin of fruit. I do have some microwaveable options for when I need lunch (morning appointment days, for instance) with whole grains, or soup, etc. Mainly my diet is *lacking* because of the combination of not eating 3 meals and not being able to snack on enough fresh fruit or veggies. There are also some days I'm literally awake long enough to eat a bowl of cereal and have a drink in the evening, then I'm too exhausted to do anything else, and it's those days that really prompted me to make sure I take supplements every day - having that habit on autopilot is essential for when there is zero brainpower! :)

Edit: I feel you on being a decent cook and wanting to do it, too. :flower: I'm not a great cook but I did enjoy it, and definitely got sufficient veg for the day when I used to be able to cook for myself! Mum does fairly healthy dinners (and yep, some nights are ready meals, of the healthier variety) but as you know, it's just not the same.

lapushka
May 11th, 2019, 01:41 PM
Thanks lapushka :flower: usually Mum cooks for all of us in the evening, and I'm rarely awake long enough to need 2 more meals in the day :laugh: so for me it's usually cereal, dinner, and any snacks. The cereal is very low sugar and I add things like chia seeds, coconut flakes and cacao nibs (mix it up in a big container) so it's not particularly *un*healthy, but it's the snacks where I fall down - some days I don't have the energy to pick grapes off the vine and wash them, or even open a tin of fruit. I do have some microwaveable options for when I need lunch (morning appointment days, for instance) with whole grains, or soup, etc. Mainly my diet is *lacking* because of the combination of not eating 3 meals and not being able to snack on enough fresh fruit or veggies. There are also some days I'm literally awake long enough to eat a bowl of cereal and have a drink in the evening, then I'm too exhausted to do anything else, and it's those days that really prompted me to make sure I take supplements every day - having that habit on autopilot is essential for when there is zero brainpower! :)

Edit: I feel you on being a decent cook and wanting to do it, too. :flower: I'm not a great cook but I did enjoy it, and definitely got sufficient veg for the day when I used to be able to cook for myself! Mum does fairly healthy dinners (and yep, some nights are ready meals, of the healthier variety) but as you know, it's just not the same.

If you like banana, maybe try that as a snack (love them and they're very healthy).

We make do, right? :)

Dark40
May 11th, 2019, 09:49 PM
Wow, 2 more inches? You must be close to hip, right?
Also, I thought that you had said you grew 1.5" per month with supplements. Or do I have you confused with someone else?

Well, I got 3 more inches before I'm hip length....but yes I'm getting close! :D
Well, when I said my hair grows 1.5 inches I was meaning without the supplements. But with the supplements I can grow 2 inches within a 3-month period. Because, when I get my hair relaxed every 3 or 4 months and my mom always do it she always say, "You have 2 inches of new growth!"

Ylva
May 12th, 2019, 04:09 AM
Well, I got 3 more inches before I'm hip length....but yes I'm getting close! :D
Well, when I said my hair grows 1.5 inches I was meaning without the supplements. But with the supplements I can grow 2 inches within a 3-month period. Because, when I get my hair relaxed every 3 or 4 months and my mom always do it she always say, "You have 2 inches of new growth!"

So your hair grows more slowly when you’re taking supplements? :confused:

lapushka
May 12th, 2019, 05:41 AM
So your hair grows more slowly when you’re taking supplements? :confused:

Yeah, that's so odd though... The explanations always seem to contradict each other. :confused:

Wusel
May 12th, 2019, 06:17 AM
Deficiencies are pretty rare, .

Not true. Statistics show that nowadays every second person has a deficiency because our food produced too fast in an unnatural environment full of chemicals doesn't have all the vitamins and minerals it had decades ago! Reliable research also shows that it's IMPOSSIBLE to get all the vitamins and minerals a human body needs from food. Unless you consume five times the calories your body needs.
I eat tons of red meat and fish and eggs and have an iron deficiency anyway and get a supplement! Why? Because the meat/eggs produced nowadays doesn't have enough iron which can be absorbed because of the antibiotics the cows/chicken get. Just an example.

LadyCelestina
May 12th, 2019, 06:31 AM
Not true. Statistics show that nowadays every second person has a deficiency because our food produced too fast in an unnatural environment full of chemicals doesn't have all the vitamins and minerals it had decades ago! Reliable research also shows that it's IMPOSSIBLE to get all the vitamins and minerals a human body needs from food. Unless you consume five times the calories your body needs.
I eat tons of red meat and fish and eggs and have an iron deficiency anyway and get a supplement! Why? Because the meat/eggs produced nowadays doesn't have enough iron which can be absorbed because of the antibiotics the cows/chicken get. Just an example.

Could you by any chance post a link to said reliable research or the statistic which supports your claim? Thanks! :flower:

Sarahlabyrinth
May 12th, 2019, 06:40 AM
Not true. Statistics show that nowadays every second person has a deficiency because our food produced too fast in an unnatural environment full of chemicals doesn't have all the vitamins and minerals it had decades ago! Reliable research also shows that it's IMPOSSIBLE to get all the vitamins and minerals a human body needs from food. Unless you consume five times the calories your body needs.
I eat tons of red meat and fish and eggs and have an iron deficiency anyway and get a supplement! Why? Because the meat/eggs produced nowadays doesn't have enough iron which can be absorbed because of the antibiotics the cows/chicken get. Just an example.

So 50% of people have deficiencies? Wouldn't that mean that 50% of people don't have deficiencies?

Wusel
May 12th, 2019, 07:01 AM
So 50% of people have deficiencies? Wouldn't that mean that 50% of people don't have deficiencies?

It's probably the ones who weigh 200 kilos and eat all day long. The obesity rate is huge.

LadyCelestina
May 12th, 2019, 07:07 AM
It's probably the ones who weigh 200 kilos and eat all day long. The obesity rate is huge.

This is a very common misconception. Morbidly obese people may be deficient in nutrients, because in many cases their diets tend to contain a lot of hyperpalatable food with little nutritional value.

ETA: Of course, so can be thin people. See: my own crappy diet :lol:

MusicalSpoons
May 12th, 2019, 07:19 AM
lapushka I wish I liked bananas! They are so good for you but I just don't enjoy them at all (and am quite specific about the ones I'll tolerate and not actively dislike). But yep, indeed we get by! :flowers:


It's probably the ones who weigh 200 kilos and eat all day long. The obesity rate is huge.

Actually obese people who graze* all day long are often malnourished because they're not eating a healthy range of food, and if it's mostly 'junk food' it certainly doesn't contain all the nutrients one needs.

*I use the term 'graze' not to make comparisons with animals but because it's a term used by medical professionals, descriptive of that eating pattern - here, at least.

Also obesity isn't an easy problem to fix - yes the solution is simple (eat fewer calories than you use) but not easy; the psychology behind *why* people eat too much is very complex and individual.

Btw lots of medication causes weight gain, so people can eat the same diet that was fine for them before but when taking medication that affects neurotransmitters, their body starts to store rather than use the energy. And yes people can end up obese from it, which can be devastating when you're already dealing with the kind of illnesses that require that sort of medication. Please think before you type generalising, ignorant statements :flower:

Edit: or, what LadyCelestina said (sorry, was typing my post before I saw yours!)

MusicalSpoons
May 12th, 2019, 08:03 AM
Forgot to say:


Not true. Statistics show that nowadays every second person has a deficiency because our food produced too fast in an unnatural environment full of chemicals doesn't have all the vitamins and minerals it had decades ago! Reliable research also shows that it's IMPOSSIBLE to get all the vitamins and minerals a human body needs from food. Unless you consume five times the calories your body needs.
I eat tons of red meat and fish and eggs and have an iron deficiency anyway and get a supplement! Why? Because the meat/eggs produced nowadays doesn't have enough iron which can be absorbed because of the antibiotics the cows/chicken get. Just an example.

That bolded part there, I have heard in the past, from a friend who did a load of research and who isn't into unscientific 'woo' so I trust her judgement. I'd love to see the evidence for it, though, just to help educate others if nothing else. (The rest of it, I don't know, haven't heard before.)

LadyCelestina
May 12th, 2019, 08:04 AM
lapushka I wish I liked bananas! They are so good for you but I just don't enjoy them at all (and am quite specific about the ones I'll tolerate and not actively dislike). But yep, indeed we get by! :flowers:



Actually obese people who graze* all day long are often malnourished because they're not eating a healthy range of food, and if it's mostly 'junk food' it certainly doesn't contain all the nutrients one needs.

*I use the term 'graze' not to make comparisons with animals but because it's a term used by medical professionals, descriptive of that eating pattern - here, at least.

Also obesity isn't an easy problem to fix - yes the solution is simple (eat fewer calories than you use) but not easy; the psychology behind *why* people eat too much is very complex and individual.

Btw lots of medication causes weight gain, so people can eat the same diet that was fine for them before but when taking medication that affects neurotransmitters, their body starts to store rather than use the energy. And yes people can end up obese from it, which can be devastating when you're already dealing with the kind of illnesses that require that sort of medication. Please think before you type generalising, ignorant statements :flower:

Edit: or, what LadyCelestina said (sorry, was typing my post before I saw yours!)

No problem - yeah, losing weight is simple in theory, but not easy.

I think the statistic Wusel mentioned (not the conclusion made from it) might be somewhat legit, if Germany is anything like my country (we're almost neighbours so it should be). The vast majority of people do not particularly care about their diets, and even if they do, it's along the lines of occasionally having a salad with their schnitzel :D But I wonder how they would even come up with that number - and what those specific deficiencies are. For example iron and vit D deficiences probably make up the majority of them, and they might or might not be diet related, the other relatively common one is B2 deficiency. I've never heard of larger cases of say, scurvy or pellagra, so I'm sure those do not make up a significant portion of the list :p

*Wednesday*
May 12th, 2019, 02:20 PM
Not true. Statistics show that nowadays every second person has a deficiency because our food produced too fast in an unnatural environment full of chemicals doesn't have all the vitamins and minerals it had decades ago! Reliable research also shows that it's IMPOSSIBLE to get all the vitamins and minerals a human body needs from food. Unless you consume five times the calories your body needs.
I eat tons of red meat and fish and eggs and have an iron deficiency anyway and get a supplement! Why? Because the meat/eggs produced nowadays doesn't have enough iron which can be absorbed because of the antibiotics the cows/chicken get. Just an example.

5 times the calories your body needs? Calories is energy (1 lbs is equal to 3,500 calories). Consuming extra calories your body does not need is either broken down and eliminated from the body or stored as fat. Consuming more calories than needed is a problem at least in the western world which leads to obesity and diabetes. Consuming more calories does not = more vitamins and minerals. More calories can include carbohydrates, sugars which can be taxing on the pancreas and not sound nutrition for a diabetic or just in general. Consuming "five times the calories" to meet nutritional needs? please provide that data from a peer reviewed journal. I just like to see facts.

Iron from animal sources is "heme" iron is the most easily absorbed compared to non-heme (plant based). People who have celiac disease can have a disorder being unable to absorb enough iron. Consuming too many eggs can cause what's called the "egg factor" which lowers iron absorption. https://www.livestrong.com/article/284339-foods-that-inhibit-iron-absorption/. Medications can limit iron absorption as well as oxalates and calcium rich foods. This does not mean there is a problem with food, it is an iron disorder and they need to supplement or change their diet all together.

Meat companies in the US do provide meat not treated with antibiotic. I do not know animal biology but not sure how this would affect iron and animals being unavailable for human bio-availability.

cjk
May 12th, 2019, 04:30 PM
Supplements do not improve growth.

Most people get it backwards. Deficiencies RETARD growth. A supplement can address that deficiency and *seemingly* improve growth because it was retarded previously.

Sarahlabyrinth
May 12th, 2019, 04:34 PM
Supplements do not improve growth.

Most people get it backwards. Deficiencies RETARD growth. A supplement can address that deficiency and *seemingly* improve growth because it was retarded previously.

A very sensible point.

MusicalSpoons
May 12th, 2019, 04:36 PM
Supplements do not improve growth.

Most people get it backwards. Deficiencies RETARD growth. A supplement can address that deficiency and *seemingly* improve growth because it was retarded previously.

Indeed. All these 'speed up growth' 'faster growth' threads and it should really be 'maximise' or 'optimise'. It's about reaching one's potential growth rate! :)

lapushka
May 12th, 2019, 05:00 PM
Supplements do not improve growth.

Most people get it backwards. Deficiencies RETARD growth. A supplement can address that deficiency and *seemingly* improve growth because it was retarded previously.

That's exactly it! :)


Indeed. All these 'speed up growth' 'faster growth' threads and it should really be 'maximise' or 'optimise'. It's about reaching one's potential growth rate! :)

Yeah, I don't like those threads that much either. Nobody has patience these days, it seems, which is exactly what you need if you want long(er) hair! It's not a short-term project!

MusicalSpoons
May 12th, 2019, 05:24 PM
That's exactly it! :)



Yeah, I don't like those threads that much either. Nobody has patience these days, it seems, which is exactly what you need if you want long(er) hair! It's not a short-term project!

In fairness it's great if people try things going into them fully-informed; had I the energy I'm sure there'd be at least one or two things I'd be interested in trying, but ultimately diet and exercise would for certain be the most fundamental 'fixes' in my life! It's fine when people experiment, understanding that there are no miracle cures, but there might be something that consistently helps them - no problem. But ultimately for *long* hair and *growing*, patience is the most major factor for anyone. Even with a fast growth rate, the hair still needs time to grow. Like you said, you can't pull it out of your scalp! (That made me LOL IRL :laugh:)

lapushka
May 12th, 2019, 06:06 PM
In fairness it's great if people try things going into them fully-informed; had I the energy I'm sure there'd be at least one or two things I'd be interested in trying, but ultimately diet and exercise would for certain be the most fundamental 'fixes' in my life! It's fine when people experiment, understanding that there are no miracle cures, but there might be something that consistently helps them - no problem. But ultimately for *long* hair and *growing*, patience is the most major factor for anyone. Even with a fast growth rate, the hair still needs time to grow. Like you said, you can't pull it out of your scalp! (That made me LOL IRL :laugh:)

Hahaha! LOL. :)