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Radiant
March 24th, 2015, 05:23 PM
So I've been trying to determine what my hair needs, specifically moisture vs. protein. I did a little reading on it and read about taking a strand of hair from a brush and pulling on it - if it snaps quickly you're said to need moisture and if it's super stretchy you need protein according to what I've just read.

My strands (did it twice once on a dry hair and once I wet it first) both broke quickly without much stretch. I also know if hair is mushy (which I can definitely recall in the past after going blonde a few years ago) that can indicate needing protein, and my hair definitely does not feel this way.

This confused me a bit though, because since I color (not henna) I always tend to believe I must need protein treatments to make up for the damage from coloring, and also the 2 products which I love the way they make my hair feel are both protein conditioners (Aussie 3 minute miracle strong, and Garnier Fructis strength reconstructing mask). Would I like the results I get from these products if my hair already had too much protein?

So what do you think? Is this test right and I should stay away from protein, or is this test not really a valid way to determine what my hair needs?

FallingDarkness
March 24th, 2015, 05:30 PM
Hmm. Aussie 3MM is a VERY Cone-Heavy conditioner. Not saying that cones are bad at all, but you might need to clarify. There tends to be great amounts of buildup from conditioners that will make your hair kinda crunchy and prone to breaking, and clarifying regularly (depending on how often you wash your hair) will definitely fix this problem. It sounds like you get enough protein, but maybe switch to a conditioner without cones? I use VO5, it's pure magic.
Your hair might need more moisture though, but I'd recommend doing deep conditioning treatments once a week, SMT's is a good one or just slather your favorite oil on the length and put it up for a day and then wash it out per usual.

Radiant
March 24th, 2015, 05:39 PM
Hmm. Aussie 3MM is a VERY Cone-Heavy conditioner. Not saying that cones are bad at all, but you might need to clarify.
I just clarified last time I washed (2 days ago), and clarify at least once every couple weeks.


It sounds like you get enough protein, but maybe switch to a conditioner without cones? I use VO5, it's pure magic.
Your hair might need more moisture though, but I'd recommend doing deep conditioning treatments once a week, SMT's is a good one or just slather your favorite oil on the length and put it up for a day and then wash it out per usual.

Yes, I just read about the SMT a few days ago, and purchased the honey, but could not find a clear non-medicated aloe. I ended up ordering one online, so will be doing a SMT as soon as that arrives. Maybe moisture is what I'm needing so hopefully the SMT will help.

meteor
March 24th, 2015, 05:53 PM
So I've been trying to determine what my hair needs, specifically moisture vs. protein. I did a little reading on it and read about taking a strand of hair from a brush and pulling on it - if it snaps quickly you're said to need moisture and if it's super stretchy you need protein according to what I've just read.

My strands (did it twice once on a dry hair and once I wet it first) both broke quickly without much stretch. I also know if hair is mushy (which I can definitely recall in the past after going blonde a few years ago) that can indicate needing protein, and my hair definitely does not feel this way.

This confused me a bit though, because since I color (not henna) I always tend to believe I must need protein treatments to make up for the damage from coloring, and also the 2 products which I love the way they make my hair feel are both protein conditioners (Aussie 3 minute miracle strong, and Garnier Fructis strength reconstructing mask). Would I like the results I get from these products if my hair already had too much protein?

So what do you think? Is this test right and I should stay away from protein, or is this test not really a valid way to determine what my hair needs?

I would trust the way your hair feels there and primarily load up on moisture/emollients: especially oils, silicones, SMTs...

However, hair can easily need BOTH protein and moisture, but usually when it's damaged, porous. Also, it's important to remember that hydrolyzed proteins act as mild humectants, too, they can help hair hold onto moisture in the right humidity.

For understanding porosity, elasticity, and how proteins and oils play into this, I highly recommend this article: http://science-yhairblog.blogspot.ca/2014/03/managing-elasticity-and-porosity-in-hair.html

By the way, just because you use hair dyes doesn't necessarily mean that your hair is damaged. It really depends on the product: some products are deposit-only and would have more of a coating effect, not needing any protein filler later at all. If the dye product has developer (peroxide) component, then it causes some of the same issues as pure lightening does, so can benefit from protein treatments, however, even then, I believe the end effect is not exactly the same as bleach damage, since the dye molecule also penetrates hair and acts a bit like a "filler". I'm sure this attempt at explanation is clear as mud :lol: , but I hope more people will jump in to explain better. :flower:

Radiant
March 24th, 2015, 06:08 PM
meteor - Thanks for the link, and I think you did a fine job explaining. I'm about half way through reading the article you linked and find it interesting that it mentions weather and dry air. In the fall I moved to Montana from Florida, so clearly a huge change in weather, despite the relatively mild winter we've had this year. Perhaps this is an important part why my hair is acting differently than what I'm use to. Definitely a lot less humidity out here.

MINAKO
March 24th, 2015, 06:15 PM
My hair also barely stretches before it rips, wet or dry. But it takes alot of force to rip it, it doesnt just just snap. Also it doesnt feel like theres a profound lack of moisture, so i guess im fine using both, moisture and proteins. The thing i really learned to load up on tho is oils. Oil is good in any situation (nevermind looking like a washed up mermaid when i take my bun down, lol)

Radiant
March 24th, 2015, 06:33 PM
My hair also barely stretches before it rips, wet or dry. But it takes alot of force to rip it, it doesnt just just snap. Also it doesnt feel like theres a profound lack of moisture, so i guess im fine using both, moisture and proteins. The thing i really learned to load up on tho is oils. Oil is good in any situation (nevermind looking like a washed up mermaid when i take my bun down, lol)

Yes, my hair didn't necessarily break super easily, but it sure didn't have much stretch to it either. I'll have to give the oils a try. I have a couple nice ones, which I usually apply a bit to damp hair after washing, but that's about the extent to which I've used oils.

meteor
March 24th, 2015, 06:43 PM
I definitely agree on oils! :agree: You could try them in different ways: pre-poo heavy oiling, light leave-in on dry or damp hair, oil rinses, oil added to conditioner/mask... It's great for increasing elasticity of brittle, dry hair and also helps reduce porosity, coats it and helps protect the hair's integrity. Really great stuff! :thumbsup:

MINAKO
March 24th, 2015, 06:49 PM
I apply a bit of oil daily throughout my entire hair after spritzing on destilled water and a bit of leave in. The the day before wash day i smother it im oil and add more stuff to it, like molasses or coconutcream. Residue? Yes sometimes, but im not too worried about getting literally everything out my hair. I CO wash and then deep condition. If my hair looks a bit too drenched i just skip any product for the next two days and it will adjust, my hair just absorbs the rest over time.

Radiant
March 24th, 2015, 07:39 PM
I apply a bit of oil daily throughout my entire hair after spritzing on destilled water and a bit of leave in. The the day before wash day i smother it im oil and add more stuff to it, like molasses or coconutcream. Residue? Yes sometimes, but im not too worried about getting literally everything out my hair. I CO wash and then deep condition. If my hair looks a bit too drenched i just skip any product for the next two days and it will adjust, my hair just absorbs the rest over time.

I've read so many good things especially about the coconut oil. Sadly I'm very allergic to coconut. I have some macadamia oil though and kendi oil and will try using them more often rather than just after a wash. Thanks for the tips.

Radiant
March 24th, 2015, 07:43 PM
I definitely agree on oils! :agree: You could try them in different ways: pre-poo heavy oiling, light leave-in on dry or damp hair, oil rinses, oil added to conditioner/mask... It's great for increasing elasticity of brittle, dry hair and also helps reduce porosity, coats it and helps protect the hair's integrity. Really great stuff! :thumbsup:

Yes, definitely going to try this next time I have a few hours to really let some oil soak in before washing, but I think increasing the use of oils (rather than only using on damp hair after a wash) is a great idea and I'll for sure start doing that. Knew I'd get good advise here.

MINAKO
March 24th, 2015, 08:32 PM
I've read so many good things especially about the coconut oil. Sadly I'm very allergic to coconut. I have some macadamia oil though and kendi oil and will try using them more often rather than just after a wash. Thanks for the tips.

Macadamia is one of my favorites, i personally like coconut pil but i could do withput it. Other favorites of mine would be sesame, argan, avocado and hemp seed oil.

gwenalyn
March 26th, 2015, 03:55 PM
There isn't much science behind the whole moisture/protein balance thing, unfortunately. The stretch test is maybe a good way to start for people just starting to pay attention to hair care, but if it contradicts your experience I wouldn't lend much credence to it.