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Baby_doll
March 6th, 2015, 06:00 PM
Okay so I'm the type of person who gets really into "healthy" things. And I recently found out about a bad ingredient in my shampoo (this being the only shampoo that I could find that previously passed my okay ingredient test. I have a few body washes that don't have any bad ingredients and I'm always hearing about how selling all these different kinds of soaps is just a marketing sceme, could I use it on my hair? Keep in mind I only shampoo my scalp In general, none of that whole length stuff. The ingredients are; sodium tallowate water sodium cocoate glycerin fragrance lavender oil sodium chloride titanium dioxide, tetrasodium edta and iron oxides.

RancheroTheBee
March 6th, 2015, 11:59 PM
Well, just based on the tallowate, the soap seems to be... actually soap based. You're going to end up with some very gummy hair, as the ph in soap tends not to react well to hair. You can try, but I would use an ACV rinse afterwards.

Alien Girl
March 7th, 2015, 12:05 AM
I would assume body wash is more soap-based??? Because it does bubble up very well and if they don't have moisturizing ingredients, can leave you feeling squeaky clean in general...

Arctic
March 7th, 2015, 12:12 AM
I've used Body Shop's Rainforest bodywashes to wash my hair. Not anymore, but for a while couple of years ago. Made my hair feel amazing. My ex also use bodyshop's normal shower gel to wash his hair, but he has short hair. Anyway, worked for him. Neither of these are soap-based though.

Nadine <3
March 7th, 2015, 12:13 AM
Probably won't hurt to try, it won't ruin your hair. It might not turn out great, but it should be fine. I've used body washes before on trips when I didn't want to pack a million bottles lol

ClassicAim
March 7th, 2015, 04:30 AM
I use sanex hypoallergenic shower gel on my scalp only and it works out fine :). if you find it a little drying you could always pre-poo with an oil before hand? I pre-poo (with coconut oil and conditioner) anyway and it really helps in making my hair not stripped at all while my scalp is squeaky clean.

Halliday
March 7th, 2015, 04:38 AM
If they're soap based and have a strong pH then you might get stringy gummy hair.

Nique1202
March 7th, 2015, 05:30 AM
In addition to the above about ending up with either gummy hair or a very unhappy scalp, I'm curious: if your shampoo was working for you, what ingredient it was that turned you off of it? Products sold in stores are safe and have to be. Most of the testing that finds that this or that chemical may cause cancer or whatever involves feeding or injecting more of it than your skin would touch in years to a mouse that's been bred to the point that it's likely to develop cancer from anything the tiniest bit damaging to DNA, or even by chance. These products have to be safe to use or a heck of a lot more people would be getting sick and suing the manufacturers.

(Sorry if I sound especially grumpy about this, but it's a pet peeve because everything is made of chemicals and anything in high enough quantities will make a tiny mouse sick... and my caffeine is still brewing.)

lapushka
March 7th, 2015, 08:52 AM
In addition to the above about ending up with either gummy hair or a very unhappy scalp, I'm curious: if your shampoo was working for you, what ingredient it was that turned you off of it? Products sold in stores are safe and have to be. Most of the testing that finds that this or that chemical may cause cancer or whatever involves feeding or injecting more of it than your skin would touch in years to a mouse that's been bred to the point that it's likely to develop cancer from anything the tiniest bit damaging to DNA, or even by chance. These products have to be safe to use or a heck of a lot more people would be getting sick and suing the manufacturers.

(Sorry if I sound especially grumpy about this, but it's a pet peeve because everything is made of chemicals and anything in high enough quantities will make a tiny mouse sick... and my caffeine is still brewing.)

I tend to agree with you, and like you "grumpy". :agree: :lol:

almorin
March 7th, 2015, 11:06 AM
In addition to the above about ending up with either gummy hair or a very unhappy scalp, I'm curious: if your shampoo was working for you, what ingredient it was that turned you off of it? Products sold in stores are safe and have to be. Most of the testing that finds that this or that chemical may cause cancer or whatever involves feeding or injecting more of it than your skin would touch in years to a mouse that's been bred to the point that it's likely to develop cancer from anything the tiniest bit damaging to DNA, or even by chance. These products have to be safe to use or a heck of a lot more people would be getting sick and suing the manufacturers.

(Sorry if I sound especially grumpy about this, but it's a pet peeve because everything is made of chemicals and anything in high enough quantities will make a tiny mouse sick... and my caffeine is still brewing.)


*nod of agreement* It's generally difficult to say definitively what the effect of long-term, low-level exposure over a lifetime to specific chemical compounds will be. The paranoia about specific chemicals in consumer products being 'bad' is usually unfounded (one exception being where a subset of the population is allergic to that ingredient and one learns by trial-and-error that they are sensitive to it--which does not sound like it applies here). As a family friend used to say "people are made of chemicals too!"

Unless the unnamed ingredient is causing a specific problem for you when using it, I wouldn't worry about it.

swearnsue
March 7th, 2015, 11:34 AM
I would just use shampoo for hair and body wash for your body. A ton of research goes into making these products and I've found that commercial products work best. For me.

meteor
March 7th, 2015, 01:39 PM
Baby_doll, what's that "bad" ingredient you mention? Unless you are allergic to a specific ingredient, there is very rarely any reason to drop a well-formulated product that gives you great results. Let your scalp and hair guide such decisions. (Companies are not allowed to sell products that are actually found to be harmful in normal amounts. Depending on the country, the regulations tend to be pretty steep. If you worry about some obscure product sold only in some tiny market, then I understand, but big international brands can't afford to incorporate "bad" ingredients - and it would cost them a lot more in legal charges and reputation.)

Nothing too problematic with that body wash, but it's not formulated for hair... also, it's soap-based, so I'd test its pH with pH testing strips (hair likes pretty acidic products around 4.5-5.5 or even lower for damaged hair). Also, where are the conditioning ingredients? Glycerin and lavender oil in possibly tiny amounts (since they are listed next to fragrance) will not give your hair enough slip and manageability, even for a shampoo. If your hair is long and/or tangle-prone or damaged, this product may be too stripping.

gwenalyn
March 7th, 2015, 02:55 PM
Body washes and shampoos tend to be formulated very similarly, so you could try the body wash in your hair once or twice to see how it goes.

But, like plenty of other commenters have said, chances are your shampoo is perfectly fine. If it's working for you, I would keep using it.

endlessly
March 7th, 2015, 04:04 PM
I wouldn't recommend it. Most body washes are going to be much more harsh than shampoos and like a few others have posted, more soap-based than anything else. A few of the body washes I use from Lush can double as a shampoo because of how mild the ingredients are and while I've tried it just to see the results (didn't notice a difference between them and the shampoo bar I use), I wouldn't make it a habit.