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View Full Version : Are you suffering hair loss? Consider trying oil pulling!



MJ1972
March 1st, 2015, 03:41 PM
Those of you who take an interest in natural medicine, or hang out with people who do, will be aware thereís a new trend out there: oil pulling, which involves swishing oil around in your mouth for about 15 minutes before spitting it out. Itís supposed to be very good for your dental health, and has been linked to many other health improvements, such as curing acne, eczema and insomnia. And yes, adherents have reported increased hair growth, too.

Iíll admit I was a bit of a sceptic at first, not least because I hate the taste and texture of oil in my mouth. However, I was convinced to start oil pulling by my mother and a friend, both of whom reported spectacular improvements in their dental health after pulling oil for just a few months. Both had dentists raving about the cleanness of their teeth and the reduction of infections in their mouths. Since I suffer from the early stages of periodontitis, I felt it was worth a try. And guess what? After trying for just four days, Iím a believer. My teeth feel cleaner and look whiter, my gums look healthier, Iíve slept like a log for the last three nights, and best of all, my shedding seems to have stopped overnight. Over the last few weeks, Iíve been suffering from severe, most likely stress-induced hair loss. My hair was coming out in clumps. However, when I brushed and washed my hair this morning, I lost a grand total of six hairs. Six, as opposed to over one hundred. So Iím converted. Oil pulling for the win!

I'm going to keep doing this for a while, and I'll keep tabs on my hair. Anyone wish to join me?

ETA: I'm looking forward to my next dentistís appointment, too. Something tells me itís not going to be as depressing as my previous appointment.

And to prove that I'm not the only one who has experienced positive effects on her hair after oil pulling:

http://www.positivelyradianthealth.lauradebenedetto.com/2011/12/gone-today-hair-tomorrow.html

Pamala513
March 1st, 2015, 03:52 PM
I have researched this a lot as well, huge benefits to it, but for someone suffering from Hashimotos, I have been told this is detrimental to their health if you have Mercury fillings...?? Guess I better research it myself some more

Salty Sloth
March 1st, 2015, 03:56 PM
On the other hand I would advise anyone interested in trying oil pulling to read all of the research first, because there is a small risk of aspirating the oil causing pneumonia with the added fact that although there are small recorded benefits for oral health (since swishing with anything is better than nothing for the most part) there are no peer reviewed studies that I could find with evidence for any other benefits. If you feel better, then great! But just keep the science behind it in mind at the same time lest you fall down a rabbit hole of things that someone swears works with no evidence behind it!

(Personal experience isn't evidence, scientifically speaking)

Edit: Here's a link to an article with additional links: http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/oil-pulling-your-leg/

MJ1972
March 1st, 2015, 04:00 PM
I have researched this a lot as well, huge benefits to it, but for someone suffering from Hashimotos, I have been told this is detrimental to their health if you have Mercury fillings...?? Guess I better research it myself some more

I, too, have heard that oil pulling may be detrimental for people with mercury fillings, but I've heard plenty of people say they did not encounter any problems. Those people may not have had Hashimoto's, though. I've decided to give it a shot, despite the fact that I have a few mercury fillings. If I encounter any problems, or if my dentist tells me to stop, I will. I'm not expecting any problems, though.

You'll have to determine whether you want to risk it, with your Hashimoto's. Best of luck either way!

meteor
March 1st, 2015, 04:04 PM
On the other hand I would advise anyone interested in trying oil pulling to read all of the research first, because there is a small risk of aspirating the oil causing pneumonia with the added fact that although there are small recorded benefits for oral health (since swishing with anything is better than nothing for the most part) there are no peer reviewed studies that I could find with evidence for any other benefits. If you feel better, then great! But just keep the science behind it in mind at the same time lest you fall down a rabbit hole of things that someone swears works with no evidence behind it!

(Personal experience isn't evidence, scientifically speaking)

Edit: Here's a link to an article with additional links: http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/oil-pulling-your-leg/

I agree wholeheartedly. :agree:

I think I'd need to see some hard evidence to consider the connection between swishing oil around in the mouth and increased hair growth. Self-reported hair growth rate is notoriously imprecise. :flower:

MJ1972
March 1st, 2015, 04:08 PM
On the other hand I would advise anyone interested in trying oil pulling to read all of the research first, because there is a small risk of aspirating the oil causing pneumonia

As far as I know, there has been one recorded case of this. One. But yes, it pays to be careful when swishing. Definitely.


... with the added fact that although there are small recorded benefits for oral health (since swishing with anything is better than nothing for the most part)...

Both sesame oil and coconut oil have been found to decrease gingivitis and other dental problems in many people. They have an anti-inflammatory effect.


... there are no peer reviewed studies that I could find with evidence for any other benefits.

True, there has not been an awful lot of scientific research into oil pulling, and what little there has been (outside India, where oil pulling originated) has not proven much, but the amount of anecdotal support oil pulling is getting is quite astounding. Call it a placebo effect if you wish, but I've heard enough rave reviews to take the practice somewhat seriously.

I hope I'm not sounding too defensive here. :-)


I agree wholeheartedly. :agree:

I think I'd need to see some hard evidence to consider the connection between swishing oil around in the mouth and increased hair growth. Self-reported hair growth rate is notoriously imprecise. :flower:

I don't think there is any hard evidence at this stage. Basically, the idea is that swishing the oil around and then spitting it out cleans bacteria from your mouth, which is a veritable hotbed of bacteria. These bacteria then cannot penetrate your mucous membranes, which is supposed to improve your overall health. There is also some ayurvedic belief that using the tongue and cheek muscles intensively for fifteen minutes on end helps activate body parts which need more action (you know, the whole meridian thing), and releases enzymes in your saliva which have a beneficial effect. I don't know the exact mechanism (no one does, I think), but it seems to be helping a lot of people. Worth a try, I think.

jaquelines
March 1st, 2015, 04:37 PM
I am regularly doing oil pulling (twice/day, morning and evening). Noticed following improvement:
- my stomach is bit better in the morning
- that eye "white" is clear, white and no more broken blood tissue (the small thin ones)

Bindi
March 1st, 2015, 07:49 PM
I have read/heard a lot about oil pulling in the past few months. I may have to stalk this thread for the sake of curiosity :)

lauren_alia
March 1st, 2015, 09:07 PM
That's great you found something that is working for you. :) I tried oil pulling for a few months about a year ago, and didn't notice any kind of benefits or difference in my health. :shrug: Then again I didn't have any health problems I was looking to "cure," I was just curious and thought I would give it a try. I stopped because sloshing oil around in my mouth really grossed me out and made me kind of gag. Also, it seemed so time consuming! That 15- 20 minutes always went by soooo slow.
ETA: also, it seemed like a huge waste of coconut oil. I mean I could put it to better use in my hair. ;)

gwenalyn
March 2nd, 2015, 10:33 AM
On the other hand I would advise anyone interested in trying oil pulling to read all of the research first, because there is a small risk of aspirating the oil causing pneumonia with the added fact that although there are small recorded benefits for oral health (since swishing with anything is better than nothing for the most part) there are no peer reviewed studies that I could find with evidence for any other benefits. If you feel better, then great! But just keep the science behind it in mind at the same time lest you fall down a rabbit hole of things that someone swears works with no evidence behind it!

(Personal experience isn't evidence, scientifically speaking)

Edit: Here's a link to an article with additional links: http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/oil-pulling-your-leg/

Seconded! I love that site as a general resource for all kinds of health fads and news, too.

sjlaurence
March 2nd, 2015, 11:32 AM
I tried doing it every day but it just takes so much time and isn't very enjoyable. I now just brush my teeth with coconut oil as if it was toothpaste, rinse, and repeat with toothpaste. My teeth are definitely whiter, and my gums are healthier.

Nightshade
March 2nd, 2015, 11:56 AM
I don't think there is any hard evidence at this stage. Basically, the idea is that swishing the oil around and then spitting it out cleans bacteria from your mouth, which is a veritable hotbed of bacteria. These bacteria then cannot penetrate your mucous membranes, which is supposed to improve your overall health. There is also some ayurvedic belief that using the tongue and cheek muscles intensively for fifteen minutes on end helps activate body parts which need more action (you know, the whole meridian thing), and releases enzymes in your saliva which have a beneficial effect. I don't know the exact mechanism (no one does, I think), but it seems to be helping a lot of people. Worth a try, I think.

Actually many of the bacteria in your mouth are important for healthy oral ecology (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oral_ecology#Ecology_and_types). Treating all bacteria as 'bad' is about the same as saying that oil pulling removes 'toxins'. Like what? In what quantities.

I could see oil pulling being good for facial exercises and building up strength in the tongue and cheek muscles. It can also be good for lightening stains from things like coffee or tea (which leave oil-soluble resins behind), but won't lighten the teeth beyond that because there is simply no mechanism for it to do so with.

I'm not trying to dampen your excitement overmuch, trust me, I enjoy my share of natural care. But it is important to be able to pare away the things that are holistic health backed by science from the downright hippie-woo. :grouphug:

furnival
March 2nd, 2015, 12:35 PM
Actually many of the bacteria in your mouth are important for healthy oral ecology (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oral_ecology#Ecology_and_types). Treating all bacteria as 'bad' is about the same as saying that oil pulling removes 'toxins'. Like what? In what quantities.

I could see oil pulling being good for facial exercises and building up strength in the tongue and cheek muscles. It can also be good for lightening stains from things like coffee or tea (which leave oil-soluble resins behind), but won't lighten the teeth beyond that because there is simply no mechanism for it to do so with.

I'm not trying to dampen your excitement overmuch, trust me, I enjoy my share of natural care. But it is important to be able to pare away the things that are holistic health backed by science from the downright hippie-woo. :grouphug:
Agree with this 100%.

If something actually works, it can be proved easily and indisputably by controlled tests. A good rule of thumb when investigating practices, treatments or products is to check whether there have been any peer-reviewed studies documenting their effects. If it works, it can be proved. Don't fall into the trap of assuming that personal testimonies have any worth as evidence, no matter how many there are and how emphatically positive they may seem. A lot of hocus-pocus is sold to people this way, and a lot of misinformation is spread.

Scarlet_Celt
March 2nd, 2015, 12:38 PM
I don't know about hair growth, but I do know from previous experience with oil-pulling that it definitely whitened my teeth.

Anje
March 2nd, 2015, 12:48 PM
I tried doing it every day but it just takes so much time and isn't very enjoyable. I now just brush my teeth with coconut oil as if it was toothpaste, rinse, and repeat with toothpaste. My teeth are definitely whiter, and my gums are healthier.
Cool idea. I might try this -- I could definitely use some teeth-whitening. :)

hennalonghair
March 2nd, 2015, 04:26 PM
It says that there were triple blind study tests done that documented the findings not just here say.
I would also be concerned about Mercury fillings.

MJ1972
March 2nd, 2015, 04:33 PM
Actually many of the bacteria in your mouth are important for healthy oral ecology. Treating all bacteria as 'bad' is about the same as saying that oil pulling removes 'toxins'. Like what? In what quantities.

You'll notice I did not actually mention the word 'toxins'. I agree it's a vague word, and yes, it does seem to be overused by oil-pulling proponents. I cringe every single time I see a blog post claiming you can practically see the toxins squirming in the oil after you spit out the oil. That's just nonsense.


I could see oil pulling being good for facial exercises and building up strength in the tongue and cheek muscles.

It is, which is presumably why many migraine sufferers say oil pulling helps them prevents migraine. Clearly, the facial exercising helps them relax or activate muscles which are somehow involved in the development of migraine. I don't suffer from migraine myself, so I wouldn't know.


It can also be good for lightening stains from things like coffee or tea (which leave oil-soluble resins behind), but won't lighten the teeth beyond that because there is simply no mechanism for it to do so with.

I think most of us will be quite happy to have those tea and coffee stains lightened. I know my tea-stained teeth could do with some whitening. :-)


I'm not trying to dampen your excitement overmuch, trust me, I enjoy my share of natural care. But it is important to be able to pare away the things that are holistic health backed by science from the downright hippie-woo.

Oh, I agree with that, Nightshade. Trust me, I'm not normally into hippie-woo. As I said in my original post, I was pretty sceptical at first, but the rave reviews kept coming, particularly in relation to people's teeth. When my mother first saw her oral hygienist after a few months' oil pulling, the woman nearly fell off her chair. She asked what my mother had been doing to her teeth and begged her to keep on doing it, as they had never been so clean. Ditto for my friend, whose dentist was very curious indeed about her teeth-cleaning routine, as she had no plaque or tartar on her last visit and an infection in one of her root canals had significantly subsided. Since my teeth are ridiculously infection-prone (I've had more root canal treatments than you have fingers), I thought I'd give oil pulling a try, as there are clearly some bad bacteria in my mouth that I'd love to get rid of. So far, it seems to have nothing but positive effects. My teeth feel cleaner and look whiter, my gums are healthier and my breath is better, all of which is great. I think I'm noticing some positive effects on my skin, hair and insomnia, as well, but those may be imaginary or due to other causes. We'll see. At any rate, I've decided that oil pulling comes under the heading of 'don't knock it until you've tried it for yourself' for me.

Salty Sloth
March 2nd, 2015, 05:03 PM
Are you sure that your gums are healthier? This article (http://www.rdhmag.com/articles/print/volume-31/issue-4/columns/just-what-is-oil-pulling-therapy.html) states that while her patients' mouths DID look better, they weren't actually healthy.

I admit both patients had nice looking and even shiny gingiva – with increased probing depths, bleeding upon touching, and sensitivity to ultrasonic or hand instrumentation.

And using the resources available to her as a dental professional she was not able to find any peer reviewed studies on the subject aside from 2 which focused on the presence of Streptococcus mutans.

There is also more information available on Snopes, the go-to site if you're ever unsure of something. :) http://www.snopes.com/medical/homecure/oilpulling.asp

MJ1972
March 2nd, 2015, 05:15 PM
Are you sure that your gums are healthier? This article (http://www.rdhmag.com/articles/print/volume-31/issue-4/columns/just-what-is-oil-pulling-therapy.html) states that while her patients' mouths DID look better, they weren't actually healthy.

She's talking about patients who stopped brushing their teeth, relying on oil pulling only. From what I've read, that is not the way to go. Most people who credit oil pulling with improving their dental health do oil pulling in addition to regular dental care, not instead of it. That's certainly what I'm doing.

furnival
March 3rd, 2015, 01:54 AM
It says that there were triple blind study tests done that documented the findings not just here say.
Are you referring to the studies by Asokan et al? They don't support the claims that oil pulling is some sort of miracle cure.

"That also seems to be the extent of the peer-reviewed scientific literature on oiling pulling Ė a few preliminary studies by a single researcher with an apparent cultural bias. Even if researcher bias is put aside, the evidence is hardly overwhelming. If taken at face value it indicates that swishing with oil is helpful to oral health, probably just because of the mechanical cleaning (perhaps enhanced by oil emulsification), but is not as effective as standard modern therapy with mouth wash."
(From the link Salty Sloth provided.)

I think that swishing with oil (or swishing with water or mouthwash for that matter) for the protracted times suggested is bound to have a mechanical cleaning action upon the teeth. As Nigtshade pointed out, some common stains are oil-soluble, so it may have a real effect with regards to the whitening of teeth. As for bacteria, the studies showed that it had significantly less effect upon oral bacteria than standard chlorhexidine mouthwash.

As for claims that it can reduce hair loss, and all the other claims, I'm immensely sceptical... :p

luvlonghair75
March 3rd, 2015, 08:29 AM
I have been totally onboard with oil pulling in the past several months.... BUT... my teeth having had their share of fillings are beginning to lose their fillings! My family and I are all due for an appointment at the dentist soon so I'm almost sure I will have to go back to refill the fillings. I love holistic health, but I think sometimes a line has to be drawn somewhere for certain remedies. As far as I know, we can't regrow our teeth, can we? As for oil pulling for hair loss? I hadn't really noticed anything different than what I normally do.

Arctic
March 3rd, 2015, 08:52 AM
I tried oil pulling last summer, but it gave me acne, so I stopped. It wasn't a suprise, my skin can't deal with oils in general, and I was expecting that reaction. I didn't do it long enough to notice any other effects.

jocelyn anne
January 21st, 2016, 03:49 AM
Hi, guys. What is oil pulling? Thanks!

lapushka
January 21st, 2016, 06:10 AM
Hi, guys. What is oil pulling? Thanks!

You might want to read the first post, it is explained quite well there. :)