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View Full Version : What to do if you have a super sensitive scalp? :/



Sicorre
December 20th, 2014, 06:15 PM
Any time I put my hair in a ponytail, braid, bun, basically ANYTHING other than hanging loose, I end up taking it out in a few minutes cause the pulling on my scalp drives me crazy. I dunno what happened... I used to wear my hair in a ponytail or braids all the time when I was younger. I even slept with braids sometimes. But then I cut it all off (to get rid of a perm) and let it grow, and I guess my head just got used to having it loose.
My hair is longer now and keeps getting in the way at work, so I try to keep it out of the way with a ponytail or braid, but I always get frustrated with how annoying it feels and take it out. :mad:
I've always had a sensitive head, never let anyone comb my hair cuz it hurt, lol. But this is ridiculous... is there any way to make it stop being so sensitive? If I just deal with it and wear my hair up will it get used to it and stop feeling like someone's pulling all my hair out? Anyone else have this problem? Maybe I'm just a wimp. :P

Madora
December 20th, 2014, 06:31 PM
You need to train the follicles to accept being in a ponytail (hanging). It also might be that your sensitive scalp hates the feeling of heavy hair hanging (ponytails are not hair friendly anyway).

To retrain your follicles, you have to wear the style for a little bit at a time. Try 5 minutes and if your scalp rebels, take down the style and detangle your hair and put it in a braid to keep it from getting tangles.

Next day, try the same style and try to increase the time up by another 2 minutes. Keep trying to increase the time you wear the style up, but don't force it! Sometimes it can take 2 weeks or more for the follicles to readjust.

As far as wearing your hair comfortably, you need to learn how to section it when you wear it up. This helps distribute the weight of your hair across your scalp, instead of putting all the weight in one spot (as in a ponytail).

Sectioning how to: Sectioning (for the double braided bun):
1) Detangle your hair gently with a wide tooth comb
2) Part your hair from the top of your right ear, around the back of your head, to the top of your other ear
3) Take all the hair ABOVE the part, comb it out gently.
4) Divide hair in 3 parts and braid it loosely. Tie off w/hair friendly elastic
5) Coil the braid you just made by holding it FLAT against your scalp. While you are coiling, pin the braid to the scalp using crimped hairpins. Pin at the four directions (North/South/East/West..use more pins if needed)
6) Tuck the tassel under the braid coil
7) Take the remaining hair, comb out gently so there are no tangles
8) Divide in 3 sections. Braid Loosely! Fasten w/hair friendly elastic band.
9) Take the braid and wind it around the braided bun already made.
10) As you wind the braid around the bun, pin with crimped hairpins. Tuck in tassel.
Voila: you have created a comfy, long lasting double braided bun! Holds like a rock.

Sectioning can also be used to create: cameo bun, triple braided bun, double twisted bun, and a whole bunch of other variations
Sectioning can be done in more than 2 sections but I've only used two for most of my braids and stuff.
Special tip for step # 8 In order to get the remaining braid as close to the bun as possible, bend your head down steeply and then begin the braid as close to the bun as you can. It is a lot easier for gravity to work for you, than against you, when you are braiding the final braid!


Hope this helps!

Arete
December 20th, 2014, 06:35 PM
How are you putting up your buns? Also, are making your braids tight near the top? You can always try making the first third of crossovers very loosely, and then tightening the stitches once you're away from your scalp. For ponytails, I find braiding up the front helps to relieve the pull at the front of my head and distribute it better.

Sicorre
December 20th, 2014, 06:54 PM
You need to train the follicles to accept being in a ponytail (hanging). It also might be that your sensitive scalp hates the feeling of heavy hair hanging (ponytails are not hair friendly anyway).

To retrain your follicles, you have to wear the style for a little bit at a time. Try 5 minutes and if your scalp rebels, take down the style and detangle your hair and put it in a braid to keep it from getting tangles.

Next day, try the same style and try to increase the time up by another 2 minutes. Keep trying to increase the time you wear the style up, but don't force it! Sometimes it can take 2 weeks or more for the follicles to readjust.

As far as wearing your hair comfortably, you need to learn how to section it when you wear it up. This helps distribute the weight of your hair across your scalp, instead of putting all the weight in one spot (as in a ponytail).

Sectioning how to: Sectioning (for the double braided bun):
1) Detangle your hair gently with a wide tooth comb
2) Part your hair from the top of your right ear, around the back of your head, to the top of your other ear
3) Take all the hair ABOVE the part, comb it out gently.
4) Divide hair in 3 parts and braid it loosely. Tie off w/hair friendly elastic
5) Coil the braid you just made by holding it FLAT against your scalp. While you are coiling, pin the braid to the scalp using crimped hairpins. Pin at the four directions (North/South/East/West..use more pins if needed)
6) Tuck the tassel under the braid coil
7) Take the remaining hair, comb out gently so there are no tangles
8) Divide in 3 sections. Braid Loosely! Fasten w/hair friendly elastic band.
9) Take the braid and wind it around the braided bun already made.
10) As you wind the braid around the bun, pin with crimped hairpins. Tuck in tassel.
Voila: you have created a comfy, long lasting double braided bun! Holds like a rock.

Sectioning can also be used to create: cameo bun, triple braided bun, double twisted bun, and a whole bunch of other variations
Sectioning can be done in more than 2 sections but I've only used two for most of my braids and stuff.
Special tip for step # 8 In order to get the remaining braid as close to the bun as possible, bend your head down steeply and then begin the braid as close to the bun as you can. It is a lot easier for gravity to work for you, than against you, when you are braiding the final braid!


Hope this helps!

Thanks a lot! I think that will be very helpful. :D I hadn't thought of sectioning.

Sicorre
December 20th, 2014, 07:01 PM
How are you putting up your buns? Also, are making your braids tight near the top? You can always try making the first third of crossovers very loosely, and then tightening the stitches once you're away from your scalp. For ponytails, I find braiding up the front helps to relieve the pull at the front of my head and distribute it better.

I use a pencil or a stick for buns, can't figure out how to do it with a ponytail holder. Yeah...I have to make them tight or else there will be a single strand that's way tighter than the others. Dunno why, it just happens.
Do you mean french braiding?

AmberJewel
December 20th, 2014, 07:46 PM
Changing the placement of ponytails, buns, etc., might also help. For example, I can't stand wearing a high ponytail = Instant headache. But low ponytails, braids, low buns, braided buns, etc., are just fine. French braids are also good. Hope this helps.

Arete
December 20th, 2014, 07:49 PM
I use a pencil or a stick for buns, can't figure out how to do it with a ponytail holder. Yeah...I have to make them tight or else there will be a single strand that's way tighter than the others. Dunno why, it just happens.
Do you mean french braiding?
When I say braid up the front, yes. Some form of "french" braid be it dutch, lace, or french or a french rope braid or just basic twisting for slightly lower ponys