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divinedobbie
December 8th, 2014, 03:01 PM
A while back I was complaining about shedding. Heres the original post: http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=126452
I went to the doctor and got my bloodwork done as I suspected thyroid. Lab tests came back with normal CBC, normal thyroid levels, normal iron and electrolyte levels. My doctor brushed me off saying shedding is normal.

Well the shedding has decreased since then but I think that's because I now wash every day which distributes the three days worth of shed I used to get. Anyway my ponytail ended up dropping half an inch (which is a lot when I only had 2.75 to start with) and I'm still shedding so I made an appointment with a different doctor tomorrow.

I've done a lot of research but there doesn't seem to be many diagnoses for female hair loss. I'm going to push getting my hormones tested in case of PCOS (even thought the other doctor refused to order those tests). You can't test for female pattern hair loss (without a derm examining your scalp but I doubt that's my issue). Any ideas for other tests I could inquire for?

ETA:
Here is a list of things I've ruled out:
pregnancy
psoriasis
seborrheic dermatitis
stress, trauma, injury, surgery
weight loss
lack of protein
too much vitamin A
tight hairstyles
birth control
autoimmune disorders
thyroid

stachelbeere
December 8th, 2014, 03:21 PM
oh so sad that you lost half an inch of your circumference :(( here is a big consolation hug!
I know how it feels, I had the same issue this year, I also shed like crazy for weeks, then it stopped. it might have been due to THREE courses of antibiotics paired with stress and a seasonal shed (most probably)
But I also had some blood work done and everything was okay (incl. thyroid).

My 2 cents:
- seasonal shed?
- iron or magnesium deficiency?

I am now also taking a hair and nails supplement (Novophane) and this contributes to many baby hairs and a faster growth (unless I imagine things with the faster growth)

I wish for your shed to stop and many, many fast growing baby hairs!

Arete
December 8th, 2014, 03:25 PM
Have you gone to an endocrinologist? For years, I was constantly exhausted and they had no idea why so they labeled me with "chronic fatigue syndrome." Ends up being that I was subclinically hypothyroid. The endocrinologist decides to put me on the thyroid medication to see if it would make a difference and voila, it did. I was presenting several symptoms of hypothyroidism (fortunately for me hair loss was not one of them) but multiple doctors refused to look into it because my bloodwork was "normal." I'd definitely recommend seeing a specialist.

mira-chan
December 9th, 2014, 05:21 PM
Vitamin D deficiency contributed to my shedding and complete stop of hair growth for a year.

divinedobbie
December 9th, 2014, 06:18 PM
Just wanted to come back and say that my doctor very strongly thinks it's vitamin D deficiency (kudos to mira-chan for being on top of the ball!) but she also ordered a vitamin B12 test as well as c reactive protein to see if there's any inflammation in my body indicating a bigger problem. She also thinks it might be PCOS but can't test because I'm on birth control right now and I'd have to be off of it for a month before testing my hormones. We figured we'd wait until the vitamin D test comes back before messing with the birth control. I hope it's just vitamin D deficiency.

mira-chan
December 9th, 2014, 07:05 PM
I hope your shed stops soon with this. I had recurring bouts of the shedding restarting with stress and illnesses for a couple of years after but things seems to have settled now.

Knifegill
December 9th, 2014, 11:31 PM
8 eggs a day will keep the shedding away IF it's nutritional. Pastured eggs have a lot of vitamin D, plus all the biotin you could imagine, and vit A among others.

Jenn_Ivan
December 10th, 2014, 12:26 AM
I had 2 major sheds where I was losing up to 400 or so strands a day. It lasted about 4-6 weeks each time. It wasn't until the 2nd time I was shedding that I realized it was a steroid called Prednisone that had caused both my sheds. The first time I was put on it for Bronchitis in February, 2011 and about 3 months later I had a really bad shed that lasted for 6 weeks or so. I didn't think anything of it and then in March, 2012 I was put on Prednisone again for Shingles and again, about 3 months later, I started shedding. I really think that particular medication caused my shedding. Is there any medication you were taking several months back that could have caused the shedding? It could be a medication you are still taking now as well.

Panth
December 10th, 2014, 10:58 AM
Thoughts:
- iron deficiency
- B12 deficiency
- vitamin D deficiency
- thyroid hormones
- sex hormones
- side effect of a medication?

mira-chan
December 10th, 2014, 11:19 AM
Even then 8 eggs may not do it if you have malformation or digestive system issues. It may exacerbate it. I get nauseous if I eat more than 2 eggs, pastured or no.

Agnieszka
December 10th, 2014, 12:43 PM
you said they checked your iron, but have they checked ferritin levels? Anything below 50 is considered too low for healthy hair growth.

divinedobbie
December 10th, 2014, 05:13 PM
Thank you everyone for all the wonderful insights!

Agnieszka, my ferritin levels were high actually, my doctor was surprised at how good my diet must be (versus the stereotypical university student).

I just got my lab results back and everything came back perfect...except vitamin D! I am definitely deficient and my doctor told me to start taking 5000 iu every day for a month and then 1000 iu every day afterwards. She did say that very low vitamin D levels affect thyroid function and that could be causing hair loss as a side effect as well, even though it didn't show up on my blood test. I'm so happy that I had a simple diagnosis and there's nothing seriously wrong with me.

Knifegill I don't think I could find a way to eat 8 eggs a day without becoming both nauseous and bored of them :)

Agnieszka
December 11th, 2014, 02:10 AM
Oh, vitamin D deficiency that could be it! So happy for you to find out possible cause.
Good luck! Loosing hair is heartbreaking I'm dealing with serious hair loss right now. I'm booked for blood tests next friday and so cannot wait.

divinedobbie
December 11th, 2014, 07:19 AM
Oh, vitamin D deficiency that could be it! So happy for you to find out possible cause.
Good luck! Loosing hair is heartbreaking I'm dealing with serious hair loss right now. I'm booked for blood tests next friday and so cannot wait.

Good luck, I hope you have a simple easy-to-fix diagnosis as well. :flower:

Agnieszka
December 11th, 2014, 08:22 AM
thank you! :flower:

wilderwein
December 11th, 2014, 08:47 AM
Can i ask something kinda random? Since (and correct me if i'm wrong) vitamin D its also produced by the sun exposure, is it possible if someone its not exposed enough to the sun to experience hair loss?

Panth
December 11th, 2014, 10:22 AM
Can i ask something kinda random? Since (and correct me if i'm wrong) vitamin D its also produced by the sun exposure, is it possible if someone its not exposed enough to the sun to experience hair loss?

You also get vitamin D from your diet. The amount of vitamin D in your body is affected by a combination of factors, including how much vitamin D-containing foods you eat (e.g. milk, oily fish), how effectively you absorb them, how much sunlight you are exposed to and how effectively your body can make vitamin D. But yes, low sunlight exposure is thought to be one of the reasons that people can become deficient.

mira-chan
December 11th, 2014, 10:26 AM
Can i ask something kinda random? Since (and correct me if i'm wrong) vitamin D its also produced by the sun exposure, is it possible if someone its not exposed enough to the sun to experience hair loss?
Vitamin D can come your skin producing it from sun exposure or from food (fish oil is a common source). For the first method there need to be materials to make it from too and those come from nutrition as well. Yes, you can have hair loss from not enough sun exposure if you do not get enough vitamin D from other sources. You could also have malformation issue that prevent you from getting enough vitamin D or precursor nutrients from diet. I have a third problem in that my skin does not produce vitamin D efficiently on sun exposure. I also tan extremely slowly but don't generally burn either.

In general if you are otherwise healthy and don't want extra sun exposure, I suggest adding more fish oil to your diet or take it as a supplement. This was very commonly done in areas with a long winter.

wilderwein
December 11th, 2014, 10:30 AM
Thanks guys for the answears! Since i'm not really a sun fun i will try to add more fish oil in my diet ^^

ravenheather
December 11th, 2014, 06:47 PM
Is there a genetic component to this malformation issue?

Panth
December 12th, 2014, 10:43 AM
Is there a genetic component to this malformation issue?

Yes, there can be a genetic component - the principle one is skin colour (darker skin more effectively blocks UV light, so is less effective at making vitamin D, especially in low light levels). However, your genetics can also affect how good you are at absorbing vitamin D from your food and how good you are at making vitamin D. However, these are all traits that involve many tens, if not many hundreds of genes, so the inheritance can be somewhat complex.

There are also non-genetic factors. Not only diet and the amount / intensity of sunlight exposure you get, but things like what exact mix of gut bacteria you have or whether you have any other dietary imbalances or insufficiencies.

mira-chan
December 12th, 2014, 11:06 AM
Yes, there can be a genetic component - the principle one is skin colour (darker skin more effectively blocks UV light, so is less effective at making vitamin D, especially in low light levels). However, your genetics can also affect how good you are at absorbing vitamin D from your food and how good you are at making vitamin D. However, these are all traits that involve many tens, if not many hundreds of genes, so the inheritance can be somewhat complex.

There are also non-genetic factors. Not only diet and the amount / intensity of sunlight exposure you get, but things like what exact mix of gut bacteria you have or whether you have any other dietary imbalances or insufficiencies.

I second this. For diet a lot of the time vitamin D production is reduces when a person doesn't get enough lipids (fats/oils) in the diet as it is an oily/ oil soluble vitamin.

I have a genetic issue that complicates my Vit. D production but it has an effect on other processes/ structures as well.