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greywolf
October 18th, 2014, 06:49 PM
I've trying to grow my hair down to hip length, but I feel like it's been at waist length forever! I just end up getting so many split ends and then I have it trimmed. I know that I should keep it in a bun to protect my hair, but it feels so heavy that I start getting headaches. Does this happen to anyone else?

I probably also wash it more often than I should. I'm a nurse, so the thought of not washing my hair when I got home from work just makes me shudder. Who knows what nasty things are in it...

burny
October 18th, 2014, 06:55 PM
I bet some people will have good ideas.. Do you always wear it down then? How do you sleep on it? Do you S&D? blow dry, straighten, etc.?

Sarahlabyrinth
October 18th, 2014, 07:02 PM
My hair is getting heavy too - at least my buns. I couldn't find a comfortable style at all this morning so right now have my hair bunned right on top of my head! I may have to try sectioned buns......

I never would have expected that fine hair would ever feel heavy....

greywolf
October 18th, 2014, 07:11 PM
I bet some people will have good ideas.. Do you always wear it down then? How do you sleep on it? Do you S&D? blow dry, straighten, etc.?


I bet some people will have good ideas.. Do you always wear it down then? How do you sleep on it? Do you S&D? blow dry, straighten, etc.?

I put it into a ponytail when I start work, but every time I sit down to chart, I take it down because I start getting a headache, then if I need to see a patient, I put it back up into a ponytail again.I need to find a hairstyle that doesn't give me such a headache so that I don't have to keep putting it up and taking it down while I'm at work.

I do blow dry now. Only because I don't have enough time to let it air air dry before I go to bed.

I probably don't S&D as often as I should, honestly.

meteor
October 18th, 2014, 07:19 PM
First of all, hair follicles need a long time to get used to being pulled in a new direction, so when you learn to put hair up it often hurts at first.
What's recommended for people new to bunning is building the tolerance: first keep hair up for half-an-hour or however long you can, then increase it by 20 minutes every day, for example. It's individual and it takes time. Just make sure not to bun too tightly.

Second, you can do braids and half-ups to lighten the weight.
You can also section hair: e.g. do a half-up bun and braid the rest of your hair to distribute the weight.
You can also do heidi braids, milkmaid braid styles that are very light or this Regency style that is a combination of a bun and 2 braids pinned like a coronet: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bQXu9enBrK0

Good luck! :flower:

Amapola
October 18th, 2014, 07:28 PM
Meteor has wonderful advice. Section and bun. And just by the way: if your hair is up, it will not get dirty. Then you won't have to wash it all the time. Leaving it down WILL get it dirty, and it will also get lint and so on and so forth in it. When it's up, that does not happen nearly as much.

I can assure you this is true. :) I live on a farm, and everyday I get up and go outside and do things that most people would not: clean stalls, throw hay, give shots to the animals, trim their feet etc. By keeping my hair up, I keep all of that various junk out of my hair. When I take it down at night, it feels like I just washed it, it smells good, and it looks good. Keeping your hair up really does make a difference.

greywolf
October 18th, 2014, 07:47 PM
I'm terrible at braiding! How do you get good at it? I'm afraid the answer is going to be "a lot of practice". lol.

greywolf
October 18th, 2014, 08:09 PM
Meteor has wonderful advice. Section and bun. And just by the way: if your hair is up, it will not get dirty. Then you won't have to wash it all the time. Leaving it down WILL get it dirty, and it will also get lint and so on and so forth in it. When it's up, that does not happen nearly as much.

I can assure you this is true. :) I live on a farm, and everyday I get up and go outside and do things that most people would not: clean stalls, throw hay, give shots to the animals, trim their feet etc. By keeping my hair up, I keep all of that various junk out of my hair. When I take it down at night, it feels like I just washed it, it smells good, and it looks good. Keeping your hair up really does make a difference.

I know there's probably not much in my hair, but I do work with a lot of nasty people. Patients who don't cover their mouth when they sneeze or cough right in my face, antibiotic resistent infections, poop, etc. =/ So the first thing I do when I get home is shower.

LauraLongLocks
October 18th, 2014, 08:58 PM
You might still have to wash it, but you don't necessarily have to wash with shampoo to get it clean. Try co-washing if you haven't already. I have found that co-washing during the week and then shampooing once a week works well for me. Too bad nursing uniforms don't include some sort of head covering to keep your hair clean. Imagine how much easier it would be to just change your head covering when you get something on it! Well, there are ponyscrubs. You might consider one of them to cover your bun. Then at least the majority of your hair would stay clean at work. Maybe then you could do a scalp-only type of wash instead of a full-length wash.

My hair is fine, and like Sarahlabyrinth, I never thought it could feel heavy. At hip length and with average thickness, sometimes it is heavy. As mentioned above, sectioning helps. Even though french/dutch braiding is harder than English braiding at this length, it is loads more comfortable than a single English braid because it distributes the weight better. Twin buns are fun, if your employer would not criticize it for being juvenile. A sectioned bun works best of all if you want the look of a single bun. Also, learning to wrap/twist hair in such a way that you don't distress your follicles by pulling/wrapping too tight helps a lot.

lunalocks
October 18th, 2014, 09:04 PM
greywolf - I know how you feel I, too, am a nurse and no longer work in the hospital setting but when I did always had to wash my hair when I came home (and clothes and take a shower etc. But that was before my hair was long enough to put into buns. Look at some bun tutorials. Get some forks and sticks. Getting my first fork and learning how to use it was a revelation. In fact I purchased and used spin pins before I had a fork and they helped immensely. Having it up keeps it cleaner. I don't feel like it is so dirty anymore except when I have to go into a home where people have been smoking. Or being around putrid wounds. Or in homes where it is really, really dirty and my clothes and hair absorb the smell.

I was at hip for a long time. Hair kept breaking off, splits etc. Decided that if I wanted longer hair I needed to just keep it up and protected. Last year I gained 7 inches. 7. Just by s and d and keeping it up and not trimming, using baby oil on the ends and catnip tea instead of conditioner and as a leave in.

mouse2cat
October 18th, 2014, 09:20 PM
Is the weight hurting your scalp or your neck? Because I find that buns that lay flatter against the head feel more balanced. And don't pull on my neck as much.

As for braiding, pull the hair over your shoulder and braid from the front so you can see what you are doing in order to practice.

Madora
October 18th, 2014, 11:31 PM
The secret to wearing buns and updos comfortably is to section them!
Sectioning (for the double braided bun):
1) Detangle your hair gently with a wide tooth comb
2) Part your hair from the top of your right ear, around the back of your head, to the top of your other ear
3) Take all the hair ABOVE the part, comb it out gently.
4) Divide hair in 3 parts and braid it loosely. Tie off w/hair friendly elastic
5) Coil the braid you just made by holding it FLAT against your scalp. While you are coiling, pin the braid to the scalp using crimped hairpins. Pin at the four directions (North/South/East/West..use more pins if needed)
6) Tuck the tassel under the braid coil
7) Take the remaining hair, comb out gently so there are no tangles
8) Divide in 3 sections. Braid Loosely! Fasten w/hair friendly elastic band.
9) Take the braid and wind it around the braided bun already made.
10) As you wind the braid around the bun, pin with crimped hairpins. Tuck in tassel.
Voila: you have created a comfy, long lasting double braided bun! Holds like a rock.

Sectioning can also be used to create: cameo bun, triple braided bun, double twisted bun, and a whole bunch of other variations
Sectioning can be done in more than 2 sections but I've only used two for most of my braids and stuff.
Special tip for step # 8 In order to get the remaining braid as close to the bun as possible, bend your head down steeply and then begin the braid as close to the bun as you can. It is a lot easier for gravity to work for you, than against you, when you are braiding the final braid!
Inversion tip:
In order to lessen tangle problems when hair is wet, try and center part your hair (while in the bent at the waist position). Then, take one side of the wet hair and hold it in the right hand. Take the other side of hair and hold it in the left hand.
Then stand erect. Place the right hand hair over the shoulder and release. Ditto with the left side.
This method is particularly helpful when brushing your dry hair. Once the brushing is finished, just make the center part, hold the hair in each hand, stand erect, then place left hand hair over left shoulder and drop. Repeat with right hand hair. The more you can control the motion of your hair, the more you cut down the horrible tangling problems that can occur (if you fling, toss or throw back your hair).


Learning to braid is simply a matter of practice. Start with a simple 3 strand braid. Try doing it on hanks of wool first so you get a "feel" for the motions. Then try it on your own hair.

It really helps if you know how to handle your hair correctly and gently. Wearing it up keeps tangles at bay, and thus, damage from detangling. The sectioning method described above helps distribute the weight of your hair over your scalp, so it isn't dependent on a ponytail (not a good thing!) to keep it up.


ETA: Simple two strand rope lace crown braid by Lilith Moon: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sPHEzUr5bWQ

Also check out the various tutorials by Torrin Paige on You Tube!

spidermom
October 18th, 2014, 11:45 PM
Two or more buns can be comfortable. Most of all, I like 2-strand rope, french and dutch braiding going across the back of my head, then I turn the free-hanging part back onto itself and pin it into place just above the original braid. It makes a lovely,complex-looking style that is actually pretty quick and easy to do WITH PRACTICE (but not necessarily a lot of practice). Here's sort of an example, except I coiled the free-hanging part.
http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c79/spidermom/snailbraid.jpg (http://s25.photobucket.com/user/spidermom/media/snailbraid.jpg.html)

I'm surprised they allow nurses to wear ponytails. They swing all over the place and get into everything for me.

greywolf
October 19th, 2014, 06:21 PM
Is the weight hurting your scalp or your neck? Because I find that buns that lay flatter against the head feel more balanced. And don't pull on my neck as much.

As for braiding, pull the hair over your shoulder and braid from the front so you can see what you are doing in order to practice.

It's my scalp that starts hurting.

greywolf
October 19th, 2014, 06:22 PM
Two or more buns can be comfortable. Most of all, I like 2-strand rope, french and dutch braiding going across the back of my head, then I turn the free-hanging part back onto itself and pin it into place just above the original braid. It makes a lovely,complex-looking style that is actually pretty quick and easy to do WITH PRACTICE (but not necessarily a lot of practice). Here's sort of an example, except I coiled the free-hanging part.
http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c79/spidermom/snailbraid.jpg (http://s25.photobucket.com/user/spidermom/media/snailbraid.jpg.html)

I'm surprised they allow nurses to wear ponytails. They swing all over the place and get into everything for me.

That's really cute! I really need to start practicing with braids.

If I don't want to get my hair in something, then I just don't pull the ponytail all the way through, but I know it's so bad for my ends.

Bill D.
October 19th, 2014, 06:35 PM
Greywolf, I haven't braided my hair in decades as it's been too thin to make that practical, but long ago my hair was reasonably thick well down my back. Braiding two braids in front wasn't hard to learn, but I despaired of learning to braid a single braid in the middle in back. However, with encouragement from others I persisted, through many false starts and fumbled braid attempts, until I learned. mouse2cat's advice is good- practice in front until braiding comes naturally. Then you'll be able to learn to do it behind your neck, out of sight, by feel. That's the hardest part- once the braid is long enough to pull around front then the rest is easy.

Bill D.

KittyBird
October 21st, 2014, 01:51 AM
Why not get a stick/fork/flexi-8 and do buns with that? I think that would be much better for your hair. I've never been able to do comfortable buns with elastics, and ponytails have always gotten uncomfortable after a while, but buns with sticks and forks are great. :)

Sharysa
October 21st, 2014, 02:15 PM
My hair is hip-length with a 3-4 inch ponytail, and coarse. I was never able to bun my hair because it was either always falling out due to thickness, or it was too heavy. Seconding the need to learn French or Dutch braiding, and I find that braids are FAR more comfortable than buns because the main weight of the braid is resting on my back or shoulder. XD