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kysgrl
August 16th, 2014, 09:32 PM
What is a good brush I can use so I can see if it makes a difference? I have a natural bristle brush but it only works when my hair is completely tangle free.

Madora
August 16th, 2014, 10:00 PM
What is a good brush I can use so I can see if it makes a difference? I have a natural bristle brush but it only works when my hair is completely tangle free.

When you use any brush, be it nylon or plastic or a boar bristle brush, for the sake of your hair, always detangle it with a COMB first! Then brush it.

I do not recommend synthetic brushes (nylon or TTs because they are synthetic and the brushing with the synthetic brush creates heat and friction). A boar bristle brush is the closest thing to the hair's natural structure because it uses the "hair" of the wild boar. HOW you use the bbb will effect how well it works for you.

Boar bristle brushes are 100% pure boar bristles. No nylon or plastic mixed with the real boar bristles. They come in different configurations and can vary greatly, depending on the bristles themselves, the number of rows of bristles, and how closely packed the bristle clumps are (or are not).

You should never just drag a brush through your hair without first detangling it..gently..with a wide tooth comb. Once your have detangled all your hair, then it is ready to be brushed...slowly.

kysgrl
August 16th, 2014, 10:19 PM
When you use any brush, be it nylon or plastic or a boar bristle brush, for the sake of your hair, always detangle it with a COMB first! Then brush it.

I do not recommend synthetic brushes (nylon or TTs because they are synthetic and the brushing with the synthetic brush creates heat and friction). A boar bristle brush is the closest thing to the hair's natural structure because it uses the "hair" of the wild boar. HOW you use the bbb will effect how well it works for you.

Boar bristle brushes are 100% pure boar bristles. No nylon or plastic mixed with the real boar bristles. They come in different configurations and can vary greatly, depending on the bristles themselves, the number of rows of bristles, and how closely packed the bristle clumps are (or are not).

You should never just drag a brush through your hair without first detangling it..gently..with a wide tooth comb. Once your have detangled all your hair, then it is ready to be brushed...slowly.
My scalp ends up aching after detangling with a comb. Too much pulling no matter how gently I do it. I end up with a headache. Thats what I liked about the TT is that there was no pulling.

PrincessBob
August 16th, 2014, 10:28 PM
It can be harmful to some hair types. If you think it is hurting your hair, then switch to a wide tooth comb or finger-combing for a while and see if it seems to improve your condition? Bu you do not like to comb your hair for the same reasons daily combing doesn't work well for me. None of the people in my life who use it get much if any damage from using it. For me the Tangle Teezer is the least painful, least damaging method of detangling my tangle-prone hair. I do get splits, but not the stall causing breakage I get with every other thing. For me it is worth it.

kysgrl
August 16th, 2014, 10:37 PM
It can be harmful to some hair types. If you think it is hurting your hair, then switch to a wide tooth comb or finger-combing for a while and see if it seems to improve your condition? Bu you do not like to comb your hair for the same reasons daily combing doesn't work well for me. None of the people in my life who use it get much if any damage from using it. For me the Tangle Teezer is the least painful, least damaging method of detangling my tangle-prone hair. I do get splits, but not the stall causing breakage I get with every other thing. For me it is worth it.
Im not completely sure its the TT. I really hope it isn't because I love it. Combing out my hair gives me a headache. I guess I will have to tough it out for a week or so for the sake of finding out if the TT is the culprit.

Latte Lady
August 16th, 2014, 10:59 PM
Have you tried a Wet Brush? It looks just like any other brush but is waaay gentler. I don't think it is quite as gentle as a Tangle Teezer, but nearly so. I don't like the Wet Brush as much as the Tangle Teezer for sorting out wet hair though. How are you using your Tangle Teezer? You still have to use proper brushing technique (working up from the bottom) and be very gentle to not cause damage. Just because you can start from the top on pull it all the way through doesn't mean you should. Especially if you very long hair. My Mother has fine/thin hair that is a little past BSL and she swears by the wet brush. My hair is mid thigh and it doesn't damage my hair if I take my time and be gentle.

Madora
August 16th, 2014, 11:18 PM
My scalp ends up aching after detangling with a comb. Too much pulling no matter how gently I do it. I end up with a headache. Thats what I liked about the TT is that there was no pulling.

That is very strange, khysgrl. How do you detangle? What kind of comb do you use? Do you finger comb your hair first before starting to actually detangle?

Do you detangle from the ends up to the roots...in SMALL sections??? You need to be slow and gentle when you detangle with a comb. No pulling, ever! That's just asking for hair breakage like no tomorrow.

If you still can't have a painless detangling session, then might I offer a possible solution to your detangling problem: moisten your hair slightly with a mister or sprayer. Then run a few drops (1 or 2 at most) of mineral oil (baby oil) over the tines of your comb (both sides). Now, take a SMALL section of your hair and begin to detangle, working from the ends, little by little, until you reach the roots. Once you have detangled a portion of hair, clip it with a barrette to keep it from getting caught back in with the undetangled hair.

To avoid the tangles problem altogether, consider wearing your hair up (if you don't already). Updos are great way to protect your hair and avoid the mess and time that it takes getting rid of tangles.

One last thing occurred to me: have you clarified your hair recently? If not, your hair might be weighed down with product buildup, which helps to contribute to tangling issues.

kysgrl
August 16th, 2014, 11:32 PM
Have you tried a Wet Brush? It looks just like any other brush but is waaay gentler. I don't think it is quite as gentle as a Tangle Teezer, but nearly so. I don't like the Wet Brush as much as the Tangle Teezer for sorting out wet hair though. How are you using your Tangle Teezer? You still have to use proper brushing technique (working up from the bottom) and be very gentle to not cause damage. Just because you can start from the top on pull it all the way through doesn't mean you should. Especially if you very long hair. My Mother has fine/thin hair that is a little past BSL and she swears by the wet brush. My hair is mid thigh and it doesn't damage my hair if I take my time and be gentle.
Yeah I have tried a wet brush. I didnt like it as much as the TT. I am using my TT in sections starting at the tip and working my way up. Like I said, Im not sure its the TT thats causing it, I want to use another detangling method for a week to rule it out. Im having a problem with my tips breaking off here and there.

kysgrl
August 16th, 2014, 11:37 PM
That is very strange, khysgrl. How do you detangle? What kind of comb do you use? Do you finger comb your hair first before starting to actually detangle?

Do you detangle from the ends up to the roots...in SMALL sections??? You need to be slow and gentle when you detangle with a comb. No pulling, ever! That's just asking for hair breakage like no tomorrow.

If you still can't have a painless detangling session, then might I offer a possible solution to your detangling problem: moisten your hair slightly with a mister or sprayer. Then run a few drops (1 or 2 at most) of mineral oil (baby oil) over the tines of your comb (both sides). Now, take a SMALL section of your hair and begin to detangle, working from the ends, little by little, until you reach the roots. Once you have detangled a portion of hair, clip it with a barrette to keep it from getting caught back in with the undetangled hair.

To avoid the tangles problem altogether, consider wearing your hair up (if you don't already). Updos are great way to protect your hair and avoid the mess and time that it takes getting rid of tangles.

One last thing occurred to me: have you clarified your hair recently? If not, your hair might be weighed down with product buildup, which helps to contribute to tangling issues. I have been using the tangle teezer for a while now. No I don't finger comb first. I go from the tips to the roots and it doesn't pull when I use the TT but if I were to use a comb it would pull no matter how gentle I went. I have been looking into some protective hairstyles, I may start a thread about it soon. I need some idiot proof ideas. The most complicated thing I am able to do is a standard braid. I use a sulfate shampoo every other day and a hard water shampoo once a month.

lapushka
August 17th, 2014, 08:04 AM
I have a wooden bristle brush (from the body shop) that I like *very* much, next to my TT. They have changed them to ball-tipped ones now, but they weren't before. Don't go for ball-tipped ends no matter what you do.

Apart from that I have a Denman (wide spaced one, not the regular one). I love them all equally. But do as Madora says up thread, detangle with a wide tooth comb first, before brushing your hair! It's important. Not so much the brush, but the technique!

truepeacenik
August 17th, 2014, 10:06 AM
I found that I missed the feel of brushing, so when I got the TT, I overdid it completely.
Like PBob, I get splits, but not heavy breakage.

Not sure a week is a long enough comparison time.

Are your ends crunchy, by any chance? Crunchy and Velcro ends are trouble with almost any detangling.

Stray_mind
August 17th, 2014, 11:47 AM
Maybe you should brush your hair with a TT and check the hair that comes out, if it has that white bulb attached to it... If it doesn't-it'll be a broken hair.

Peggy E.
August 17th, 2014, 12:12 PM
I have a wooden bristle brush, too, and really like it. it doesn't have the bulbs on the ends of the prongs, but I've had it for a long time and the wooden prongs are beginning to come out of the cushioned comb bed.

when I use a comb, I always hold the section being combed in one hand, so it is not being pulled on as it is being combed. starting with the ends first, working up, I hold it until I get to the hairline. this seems to make a big difference in hair being pulled out or my scalp yanked.

meteor
August 17th, 2014, 06:24 PM
I have been using the tangle teezer for a while now. No I don't finger comb first. I go from the tips to the roots and it doesn't pull when I use the TT but if I were to use a comb it would pull no matter how gentle I went. I have been looking into some protective hairstyles, I may start a thread about it soon. I need some idiot proof ideas. The most complicated thing I am able to do is a standard braid. I use a sulfate shampoo every other day and a hard water shampoo once a month.

I really agree with Madora's advice. Brushing should happen only after very thorough detangling with fingers/wide-tooth combs or rakes.
For the idiot-proof styling ideas, just wrap/circle your English braid around its base and pin it down - that's a basic braided bun. I wore my hair in this exact style almost every day, and it got me from BSL to TBL+. Also, I used to have lots of split ends (bleach damage), but I don't get splits at all anymore, since I started putting my hair up every day and ditched my brush.
Putting hair up really helps avoid tangles and therefore results in less frequent combing/brushing >> less potential mechanical damage.
I also highly recommend oiling your ends (braid tassel) and sleeping on smooth surfaces (silk/satin pillowcases/sleep-caps/scarves) to protect your ends from mechanical damage.

Good luck! :flower:

tetisheri72
August 17th, 2014, 07:44 PM
I got a boar's bristle brush but I'm not happy with it. It only brushes the very tip top part of my hair. I think I need one that is more widely spaced or has longer bristles. I detangled and then brushed, and it only ended up tangled again.

Madora
August 17th, 2014, 08:32 PM
I got a boar's bristle brush but I'm not happy with it. It only brushes the very tip top part of my hair. I think I need one that is more widely spaced or has longer bristles. I detangled and then brushed, and it only ended up tangled again.

This might help, tetisheri72:

Brushing with a boar bristle brush

Bend at the waist and bring all hair in front of you like a curtain

Finger comb gently down through the hair (I use 2 fingers)

Take a small, thin section of hair, and working from the ends, comb it out gently with your wide tooth comb. Go up the strands, little by little, until you reach the roots. You might want to scrunchie the hair you have already detangled to keep it separate from the other hair.

Continue until all the hair has been detangled

BRUSHING – Canopy hair:

Start at the nape and slowly brush down your hair to the very ends. Go slowly!

Follow each swipe of the brush with the palm of your other hand. Your brush is the (+) and your hand is the minus (-). This method helps calm the static made by the brushing.

Underneath the canopy:

Place the brush bristles on your forehead and slowly move the brush into your front scalp hair. Raise the brush up slightly (about 3 inches), then extend your brush directly out in front of you then down to the floor. The brushing motion should be fluid. Moving from the hairline, up, out and down..all one motion..no jerking. Do it slowly!

Continue brushing again down the nape (canopy hair) and the under canopy hair.

When hair has been fully brushed, part it from nape to forehead so that it is in two sections.

Hold the ends of the hair so that the left section is in the left hand and the right section is in the right hand.

Stand erect.

Take the hair in the right hand and gently place it over the right shoulder and let it fall.

Do the same with the left hand side.

Check for tangles once again, then style as desired.





Number of strokes:

Is a matter of preference. Consistency is more important than quantity.

VERY IMPORTANT!

If you have never brushed your hair in the bent at the waist position (i.e. “upside down”, it is imperative that you start your brushing routine slowly...with a minimum of strokes.

Your hair follicles need time to adjust themselves to the way they are being brushed. If you brush too much, your scalp will HURT!

Thus, when starting out, start with 10 to 15 strokes to begin with. Then, over the next few weeks, add a stroke or two when you can do so comfortably. Keep adding strokes until you reach your goal.

About hair brushes:

Although I have no evidence to back this up, I think the shape of the brush has a lot to do with how well it interacts with your hair. My Goody brush is made of wood, measures 8.5 inches from top to bottom, is 1.4 inches wide, the handle measures 4 inches and it has 7 rows of moderately stiff, thin flexible black boar bristles. It is narrow and not oval. My hands are small and this type of brush is much more ergonomically friendly than a large, oval paddle brush.

About natural boar bristles:

They are the shed “hair” of the wild boar and as such, mesh well with going through human hair strands.

They can be of various lengths, thicknesses, colors. Stiffer, longer bristles are supposed to be able to handle thicker hair. Personally, a stiffer, thicker bristle didn't work for my very thick hair. I prefer a bristle that is still with a little flexibility to it.

The stiffness in your bbb will lessen with time...depending on how much you use it.

Miscellaneous:

For best results, keep your brush (and comb) squeaky clean. Wash both weekly (preferably more) and dry the brush, bristles side down, on a lint free cloth, out of the way of direct sunlight. Store it in an airtight box to keep lint/dust from getting on it.


Benefits of regular, daily boar bristle brushing:
Distributes the hair's natural sebum down the strands
Exercises your hair follicles, which is necessary for good hair growth
Removes dead hair cells/lint/dust from your hair
Over time will leave your hair glossy and incredibly soft

How often to brush:

Every day...in the morning..when you get up. Per Dr. George Michael, this is the optimum time to brush.

Try and be consistent – do the same number of strokes per day.

Brush gently and always detangle with a wide tooth comb BEFORE brushing.

Try to wear something other than nylon or rayon when brushing as both fabrics can cause more static.

Never, EVER, toss/fling/throw your hair over your head when you are finished brushing. You want to keep the hair as free of tangles as possible.

NEVER, EVER, BRUSH YOUR HAIR WHEN IT IS WET OR DAMP!

Keep your brush free of shed hairs. Clean it out after each brushing session!

Brushing is good for your hair, provided you use a natural boar bristle brush and the proper technique. (However, it is not recommend for curlies since the structure of their hair does not lend itself to brushing).

Nearly everything I've learned about hair care came from Dr. George Michael, the Czar of Long Hair. I've never been disappointed with his advice!

Brushing does work – it all boils down to your brush and how you use it.

meteor
August 17th, 2014, 08:40 PM
That's very interesting, Madora! :)
I'm curious: with such frequent and thorough brushing, do you need to replace BBB every couple years?

Also, something I forgot to mention to the OP: if your Tangle Teaser is old, it can damage your hair, because plastic bristles develop tiny splits/snags that may be invisible without a microscope but can still be quite damaging. TTs need to be replaced relatively frequently (because they are made of plastic), unlike a high-quality BBB or a wooden brush presumably.

tetisheri72
August 17th, 2014, 11:13 PM
Thanks Madora, I'll try that out for a couple of weeks to see if that works for me. The basic Goody brush is what I have too.

truepeacenik
August 17th, 2014, 11:29 PM
Meteor, I'd never thought of how quickly the TT and relatives would split themselves. And I drop them often. Or, rather, invisible monkeys yank it from my hand and throw the TT across the room.

CJCHair-stylist
August 17th, 2014, 11:34 PM
Hi - I know you are asking about brushes and you have already had some very good suggestions already - the denman is a good one. Although you may not have to get a new brush at all. I really suffer with tangles - like every time .... until recently. Lapushka mentioned the WCC wash - where you shampoo your scalp, condition below ears - leave on for two minutes and rinse - condition below ears - leave on for two minutes and final rinse. This has reduced my tangles by 90 percent! I always thought conditioning once and leaving it on longer would be enough, but then I tried the WCC and it has made my hair silky, manageable and easy to comb hair. I thought 15 years of hairdressing I would have known about this method, but as with everything you learn something new every day. So try this, I hope it works for you as well as it has for me.

tetisheri72
August 18th, 2014, 08:43 AM
I tried this out this morning. It felt really good doing it, so I think I did one or 2 too many strokes. It was really soothing, but parts of my scalp are a little sore. OTOH, my hair feels really nice.

Entangled
August 18th, 2014, 09:14 AM
How often would one have to replace a tangle teezer?

Madora
August 18th, 2014, 10:13 AM
That's very interesting, Madora! :)
I'm curious: with such frequent and thorough brushing, do you need to replace BBB every couple years?

Also, something I forgot to mention to the OP: if your Tangle Teaser is old, it can damage your hair, because plastic bristles develop tiny splits/snags that may be invisible without a microscope but can still be quite damaging. TTs need to be replaced relatively frequently (because they are made of plastic), unlike a high-quality BBB or a wooden brush presumably.

Meteor, on average, my Goody brushes (3) of them, lasted from 10 to 12 years each. The last one, which I'm using now, is only about 6 years old but showing signs of early ageing, much to my dismay (they don't make this version any longer).

I tried out my new Classic Wood CONAIR Natural Shine Booster pure bbb (purchased at Target for under $10) yesterday. Was a little heartsick because I washed the brush before I used it (to be on the safe side) and good grief, it lost at least 30 bristles during the process. I've never had this happen...in all the years I've been brushing.

The brush felt good and went through my hair very nicely. I just hope the bristle loss doesn't increase.

I think the longevity of a bbb depends greatly on how well its made. The better companies don't stint on anchoring their bristles well in their individual settings...plus the glue that's used to anchor the bristles in place. Maybe some companies make better glue than others?? Of course how you care for your brush really helps extend its life. No hot water, no leaving the brush in the direct sun, and always laying the brush with the bristles facing downward. The less water your brush retains while drying, the better. Always a good thing to shake it out well, and fan the bristles to expel even more water.

kysgrl
August 19th, 2014, 08:44 PM
I found that I missed the feel of brushing, so when I got the TT, I overdid it completely.
Like PBob, I get splits, but not heavy breakage.

Not sure a week is a long enough comparison time.

Are your ends crunchy, by any chance? Crunchy and Velcro ends are trouble with almost any detangling.
Crunchy and velcro definitely describe my ends.

kysgrl
August 19th, 2014, 08:45 PM
This might help, tetisheri72:

Brushing with a boar bristle brush

Bend at the waist and bring all hair in front of you like a curtain

Finger comb gently down through the hair (I use 2 fingers)

Take a small, thin section of hair, and working from the ends, comb it out gently with your wide tooth comb. Go up the strands, little by little, until you reach the roots. You might want to scrunchie the hair you have already detangled to keep it separate from the other hair.

Continue until all the hair has been detangled

BRUSHING – Canopy hair:

Start at the nape and slowly brush down your hair to the very ends. Go slowly!

Follow each swipe of the brush with the palm of your other hand. Your brush is the (+) and your hand is the minus (-). This method helps calm the static made by the brushing.

Underneath the canopy:

Place the brush bristles on your forehead and slowly move the brush into your front scalp hair. Raise the brush up slightly (about 3 inches), then extend your brush directly out in front of you then down to the floor. The brushing motion should be fluid. Moving from the hairline, up, out and down..all one motion..no jerking. Do it slowly!

Continue brushing again down the nape (canopy hair) and the under canopy hair.

When hair has been fully brushed, part it from nape to forehead so that it is in two sections.

Hold the ends of the hair so that the left section is in the left hand and the right section is in the right hand.

Stand erect.

Take the hair in the right hand and gently place it over the right shoulder and let it fall.

Do the same with the left hand side.

Check for tangles once again, then style as desired.





Number of strokes:

Is a matter of preference. Consistency is more important than quantity.

VERY IMPORTANT!

If you have never brushed your hair in the bent at the waist position (i.e. “upside down”, it is imperative that you start your brushing routine slowly...with a minimum of strokes.

Your hair follicles need time to adjust themselves to the way they are being brushed. If you brush too much, your scalp will HURT!

Thus, when starting out, start with 10 to 15 strokes to begin with. Then, over the next few weeks, add a stroke or two when you can do so comfortably. Keep adding strokes until you reach your goal.

About hair brushes:

Although I have no evidence to back this up, I think the shape of the brush has a lot to do with how well it interacts with your hair. My Goody brush is made of wood, measures 8.5 inches from top to bottom, is 1.4 inches wide, the handle measures 4 inches and it has 7 rows of moderately stiff, thin flexible black boar bristles. It is narrow and not oval. My hands are small and this type of brush is much more ergonomically friendly than a large, oval paddle brush.

About natural boar bristles:

They are the shed “hair” of the wild boar and as such, mesh well with going through human hair strands.

They can be of various lengths, thicknesses, colors. Stiffer, longer bristles are supposed to be able to handle thicker hair. Personally, a stiffer, thicker bristle didn't work for my very thick hair. I prefer a bristle that is still with a little flexibility to it.

The stiffness in your bbb will lessen with time...depending on how much you use it.

Miscellaneous:

For best results, keep your brush (and comb) squeaky clean. Wash both weekly (preferably more) and dry the brush, bristles side down, on a lint free cloth, out of the way of direct sunlight. Store it in an airtight box to keep lint/dust from getting on it.


Benefits of regular, daily boar bristle brushing:
Distributes the hair's natural sebum down the strands
Exercises your hair follicles, which is necessary for good hair growth
Removes dead hair cells/lint/dust from your hair
Over time will leave your hair glossy and incredibly soft

How often to brush:

Every day...in the morning..when you get up. Per Dr. George Michael, this is the optimum time to brush.

Try and be consistent – do the same number of strokes per day.

Brush gently and always detangle with a wide tooth comb BEFORE brushing.

Try to wear something other than nylon or rayon when brushing as both fabrics can cause more static.

Never, EVER, toss/fling/throw your hair over your head when you are finished brushing. You want to keep the hair as free of tangles as possible.

NEVER, EVER, BRUSH YOUR HAIR WHEN IT IS WET OR DAMP!

Keep your brush free of shed hairs. Clean it out after each brushing session!

Brushing is good for your hair, provided you use a natural boar bristle brush and the proper technique. (However, it is not recommend for curlies since the structure of their hair does not lend itself to brushing).

Nearly everything I've learned about hair care came from Dr. George Michael, the Czar of Long Hair. I've never been disappointed with his advice!

Brushing does work – it all boils down to your brush and how you use it.




Thanks for all the great advice!

kysgrl
August 19th, 2014, 08:46 PM
Meteor, I'd never thought of how quickly the TT and relatives would split themselves. And I drop them often. Or, rather, invisible monkeys yank it from my hand and throw the TT across the room.
Lol! Isnt that the truth!

truepeacenik
September 29th, 2014, 10:13 AM
Kysgirl, sorry to let this languish for a month and some.

If your ends are crunchy, try clarifying. I use some cheap strong shampoo I'd never, ever consider using on a weekly basis. But it's green, goopy, and reminds me of the REAL Clairol Herbal Essence I grew up with in the 1970s. And I could probably clean a car engine with it. (Vanart)
So I do dilute it in my palm using my patented small glop in cupped hand which then collects water method.
It's extremely precise, as you can imagine. ;)
Yeah, I should save some small plastic bottle and dilute before use.
I should also get better about doing burpees.
Yeah.

Anyway, even though I don't use typical products, I do oil, and I do have a coney conditioner, used as needed as a second step in my straight hair version of WCC.
My ends are a mess for the last six inches, and if I trim, it seems to extend up to stay consistently at six inches.

I'm sure it's related to braid tassel, tangle damage, and maybe Mars in retrograde or something. Or the squirrels are casting spells on me for removing a bird feeder. ;)
In other words, beats me why.

So I attempt to mix benign neglect and care at 70/30.
Holding steady.