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View Full Version : Scratched scalp a little too hard :|



Wosie
August 12th, 2014, 10:17 AM
I have atopic eczema and a constantly itching scalp (it can be calm for a while, but mostly the itch is bad). For a while now an area right next to my widow's peak has been lacking some hair due to me scratching rather often and mindlessly touching there at other times. I have avoided the mindless touching, but today I went a little too far with my scratching.

I scratched (not very hard, in my opinion, but people with itching skin diseases ought to know that one scratches way harder than one thinks) and now I have a rather big, weeping wound there and I lost some hair again when I combed the hair out right afterwards.

Should I leave the wound as is, or do you think I should put some ointment/oil/cream on it? Maybe rinsing it with some water? I'm guessing that a topical cream (with cortisone) is not a good idea...?

Hibernis
August 12th, 2014, 11:09 AM
This seems like something to check in with a doctor about. Otherwise, basic "keep it clean" wound care is never a bad idea.

meteor
August 12th, 2014, 11:40 AM
If it's a bad case, go to your family doctor.
If not, just keep that area clean and protected from the sun (wear a hat when outside). Wounds really need to be protected from the environment, especially UV rays.

Avoid alkaline products on it. It's important to help the skin restore its acid mantle fast. Honey has light anti-bacterial properties and it's a humectant, so you can probably wash that area with honey + distilled water.

When it's beginning to heal, you might want to apply something like aloe vera and/or vitamin E to it to help it heal faster.

All this, assuming you have no allergies to honey, aloe or vitamin E, of course.

Good luck! :)

Anje
August 12th, 2014, 12:19 PM
Personally, I'd just rinse it and otherwise leave it alone. Bodies are good at doing what they need to to heal themselves.

Johannah
August 12th, 2014, 12:45 PM
Personally, I'd just rinse it and otherwise leave it alone. Bodies are good at doing what they need to to heal themselves.

Totally agree with this.

Wosie
August 12th, 2014, 01:45 PM
Hibernis, I have been visiting the hospital's dermatologists on and off since I was 11 (I've been hospitalised a few times too) and they cannot help me except for with topical steroids. Topical steroids and moisturizers, though I try to avoid cortisone as it makes the skin thinner and more sensitive.

meteor, Thank you. :flower: The wound is still a little open, but I will try not to touch it or aggravate it. It's just sad how I tried my hardest to regain the hairs there, and now I'm back to square one again... I hope I'm just exaggerating. What kind of things have vitamin E in them?
I'm not sure about aloe vera and honey, I think I might be a little allergic to both of them (extremely sensitive person), but I can still try them out.

Anje & Johannah, I hope you're right. :o I mean, I'm used to wounds (!), but I have to admit that I was pretty shocked when I saw myself in the mirror. I couldn't believe I had scratched that hard.

Thanks for your replies. :') It feels nice to just talk about my dermal issues with others, it's something I normally suffer with in silence, and it isn't easy.

meteor
August 12th, 2014, 02:02 PM
If you are even a little bit allergic to honey or aloe, avoid at all costs on a wound! :)

Vitamin E oil promotes faster healing of scarring skin wounds, just don't apply it on an OPEN wound (that might actually increase chances of skin irritation, or dermatitis). Open wounds should be just kept clean and protected from the environment. I'd basically apply vitamin E or any good natural oil that your scalp likes only AFTER the healing is way on its way, as a way of avoiding dehydration (dehydrated skin is very common around wounded area) and to speed recovery along.

lapushka
August 12th, 2014, 02:26 PM
If it's a wound, don't put cortisone ointment on it. You can't let that get into a wound. Do you have some sort of wound-care ointment? I'd use that (for the time being) and immediately go see your doctor. This is nothing to mess around on your own with.

mz_butterfly
August 12th, 2014, 02:36 PM
I may be going against the grain here. I would clean it with a dab of alcohol and then put a teeny bit of antibiotic ointment on it. Make sure the hairs are not sticking to the wound or it won't want to heal properly. Then leave it alone. Don't touch it and it will heal in a couple of days.

Wosie
August 12th, 2014, 02:55 PM
meteor, Do you know if vitamin E oils are available in grocery stores? Or does one find them in drug stores?

lapushka, What is the major concern of putting cortisone onto open wounds? ... I've been doing that regularly ever since my eczema broke out (15+ years). :S (I did that today, actually, but not on my scalp.) I don't have any ointments like that, sadly, nor any alcohol, as mz_butterfly suggested. :/ I just dabbed the wound with warm/hot water until it looked cleaner, and then I put on some fat cream (which I normally use on my face, so I reckoned it'd work OK on my scalp as well). It hurt a little for a minute or so, but now it feels fine.
I will try my hardest not to scratch this area anymore for a while now, it started to itch a few hours ago, but I didn't do it. I guess it'll get itchier as the wound start to close, but I have to stay strong. :agree:

meteor
August 12th, 2014, 03:23 PM
meteor, Do you know if vitamin E oils are available in grocery stores? Or does one find them in drug stores?

I got it at a drug store, but I think it's available at grocery stores and health stores, too.

It's not really necessary, but can be helpful.

And do protect your wound on scalp from UV rays with a hat/scarf.

Ideally, you should work with your doctor to get eczema under control and check with your doctor that your hair care and skin care products won't make your eczema flare up.

Best of luck! :)

lapushka
August 12th, 2014, 03:52 PM
lapushka, What is the major concern of putting cortisone onto open wounds? ... I've been doing that regularly ever since my eczema broke out (15+ years). :S (I did that today, actually, but not on my scalp.) I don't have any ointments like that, sadly, nor any alcohol, as mz_butterfly suggested. :/ I just dabbed the wound with warm/hot water until it looked cleaner, and then I put on some fat cream (which I normally use on my face, so I reckoned it'd work OK on my scalp as well). It hurt a little for a minute or so, but now it feels fine.
I will try my hardest not to scratch this area anymore for a while now, it started to itch a few hours ago, but I didn't do it. I guess it'll get itchier as the wound start to close, but I have to stay strong. :agree:

It's always good to read the documentation that comes along with your medicine. I *always* do and I use that type of cream as well!

Take a look at this. In this page, it says:

http://www.medicines.org.uk/guides/hydrocortisone/inflammatory%20skin%20conditions


Whether this medicine is suitable for you

Hydrocortisone is not suitable for everyone and some people should never use it. Other people should only use it with special care. It is important that the person prescribing this medicine knows your full medical history.

Your prescriber may only prescribe this medicine with special care or may not prescribe it at all if you:

--> are allergic or sensitive to or have had a reaction to any of the ingredients in the medicine
--> have an infection in the area where Hydrocortisone needs to be applied
--> have broken skin, ulcers, or nappy rash or an open wound in the area where you are planning to apply Hydrocortisone

Firefox7275
August 12th, 2014, 03:55 PM
Put a really neutral moisturising cream on, ideally one formulated for open wounds or sore skin (I use diaper rash cream). Research indicates wounds kept wet but clean heal faster than ones allowed to dry out, think burns/ acid peels or what happens UNDER a scab.

Wosie
August 12th, 2014, 05:04 PM
I really appreciate your replies. :o

meteor, I promise my scalp won't get sunburnt. :) I barely leave the apartment as is. I'll try to remember to always wear a cap/hat outdoors until it's autumn. I have to admit that I avoid to go to my dermatologist for as long as possible, as she doesn't seem to take what I say seriously. I feel awkward around her (I've written about this before I just remembered). (Mayhaps I should finally dare to request a new doctor.)

lapushka, I always read the fine print too, but when I was hospitalised they always put cortisone in my open wounds, so I reckoned that "if the nurses and doctors think it's fine, then it ought to be fine". I never noticed any negative effects while doing so either, that's why I am curious about why one shouldn't. :hmm: I've noticed that putting cortisone on top of my wounds make them heal much faster than with a standard moisturizer, though.

Firefox, I just went and read on the ingredients list and it has 42% fat (whatever that means o_O), peanut oil and glycerin in it. It's for "very dry and sensitive skin". Do you think I should rinse the wound again and apply some more or am I good to go to sleep without doing anything else? I guess it's best not to irritate the area further by rinsing it/applying more cream...?

lapushka
August 12th, 2014, 05:23 PM
lapushka, I always read the fine print too, but when I was hospitalised they always put cortisone in my open wounds, so I reckoned that "if the nurses and doctors think it's fine, then it ought to be fine". I never noticed any negative effects while doing so either, that's why I am curious about why one shouldn't. :hmm: I've noticed that putting cortisone on top of my wounds make them heal much faster than with a standard moisturizer, though.

That is such an odd thing, because on my cream, my prescription distinctly states not to put it on open wounds or mucous membranes.