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View Full Version : How is it possible to trim/cut over processed bleached hair?



Ayano
July 20th, 2014, 03:09 PM
This may sound like a very idiotic question and I apologize if it does but to make my hair healthier I have to cut my hair since its over processed. I've decided to get layers but I just wanted to know if it was even possible to get my hair cut since hairstylists have to wet your hair and when my hair is wet it gets very gummy and it sticks together. It falls off and breaks just by touching or running my fingers through it. Wouldn't it just make their job harder or even impossible?:confused: I'm just really scared of the fact that all my hair is going to fall out. Cutting off all the damage is definitely out of the question since it's almost time to get back to school and I get bullied enough. Is it possible to ask them not to wet it? Or do they have some kind of trick for over processed hair? Please help me! :pray:

woodswanderer
July 20th, 2014, 03:17 PM
You can get a dry cut...I always do now. Just ahead call and find someone who doesn't mind doing a dry cut.

MINAKO
July 20th, 2014, 03:19 PM
Of course you can have your hair cut dry.
But if it's literally damaged to the point where it melts off you hair as soon as it gets wet, how on earth do you even wash and detangle it.
I had badly overprocessed hair once and gradually lost alot through breakage, but as a result i decided to cut ALL the damage indeed at some point.
If the case is that severe i doubt you could avoid the big chop and still have presentable hair, dunno...

EIther way, it takes patience and TLC, theres not quick fix or wonder hairdresser to instantly solve the problem.
Good luck!

FallingDarkness
July 20th, 2014, 03:30 PM
I had to go in for a trim a week ago (ugh) and got 1/4 of an inch off dry.
Just ask. Most stylists don't have a problem with it.
Could you post pics of your hair so we can offer better advice?

FallingDarkness
July 20th, 2014, 03:30 PM
I had to go in for a trim a week ago (ugh) and got 1/4 of an inch off dry.
Just ask. Most stylists don't have a problem with it.
Could you post pics of your hair so we can offer better advice?

FallingDarkness
July 20th, 2014, 03:32 PM
Double post!!! Sorry :(

spidermom
July 20th, 2014, 04:04 PM
Stylists can cut hair dry. However, in order to get nice even results, they like to straighten your hair if it's dry, and it doesn't sound like your hair could take the heat right now. Talk with your stylist. He or she will have a better idea of how to give you best results.

MINAKO
July 20th, 2014, 04:13 PM
Actually instead of wetting it, i oil mine heavily when giving myself a trim. But then again you need to wash the oil out afterwards anyways.
I agree that flat ironing at this stage wouldnt be a good idea tho.

I would still suggest to just get rid of the damage, most of it will break by itself anyways, cause tangles and friction and affect the not yet so damaged hair further up.
No matter what it looks like after the cut, see it as lesson learned and not only the negative side. Short hair can look amazing, imho much better than fried and medium length.

SkyChild
July 20th, 2014, 04:20 PM
Get a dry cut. I'd cut as short as you dare go, to get rid of the lot. Coconut oil really helped me when my hair was at that gummy bleached stage. It doesn't repair the damage but it can help with moisture temporarily as you wait for it to grow.
*hug* try ignore bullies. No one at school knows ANYTHING, trust me.

spidermom
July 20th, 2014, 06:00 PM
P.S: I once made the huge mistake of adding baking soda to my shampoo, and it dried my hair out so bad that it matted together like felt. I couldn't get a comb through it unless it was wet and full of conditioner. That is the only way I could comb it. I was just thinking that if the stylist does feel he or she needs to wet your hair to give a good cut, he or she will probably use a very coney conditioner to aid in manipulating your hair. What would break off is going to break off anyway.

Short hair is still within the acceptable realm of hair fashion, isn't it? I wouldn't think you'd be bullied for having short hair. And even so - with bullies, anything goes. If they're not picking on you for one thing, they'll pick on you for something else. Learn to stand up for yourself; you'll get more respect.

joesgirl2011
July 20th, 2014, 06:08 PM
Ayano - I have spent a lot of time figuring out how to fix my fried bleached hair over the years. Before you go get it cut off go to Sallybeauty.com or Sally's Beauty Supply and purchase Aphogee 2 Step Protein Treatment Packet. It's about $3.00. Do what it says on the package and then see how your hair is after. You are missing almost all the protein from your hair from the sounds of it. Aphogee is for exactly your problem you are having. Professionals will use this one over processed gummy hair to save it. You need to fill the protein back into your hair. You would do this every 6 weeks. Also keep deep conditioning after this to build your hair back with moisture. Coconut oil is a great one to use and most people here use it. A hairdresser will chop it off when she/he sees the damage ...be careful. Try Aphogee FIRST. I speak from experience.

Firefox7275
July 20th, 2014, 06:40 PM
Welcome to LHC!

Agree with the advice to immediately use a hydrolysed protein treatment, be that a commercial product or DIY gelatin (see Sciencey Hairblog). Then get a dry cut if necessary, but you definitely won't be the first or the last badly overprocessed head an experienced stylist has worked with.

And in future run strand tests on shed plughole hair before bleaching/ relaxing, please don't use your crowning glory as a laboratory.

Good luck!

MINAKO
July 20th, 2014, 06:49 PM
Haha! Indeed FIrefox. Bad thing that i had one of those expirienced stylists ruining my hair in the first place tho and on top of it paid more than 350,-euros for a japanese straightening. A true expert is hard to find these days, better to learn about our hair ourselves and become one. ;)

apynip
July 20th, 2014, 06:56 PM
Ayano - I have spent a lot of time figuring out how to fix my fried bleached hair over the years. Before you go get it cut off go to Sallybeauty.com or Sally's Beauty Supply and purchase Aphogee 2 Step Protein Treatment Packet. It's about $3.00. Do what it says on the package and then see how your hair is after. You are missing almost all the protein from your hair from the sounds of it. Aphogee is for exactly your problem you are having. Professionals will use this one over processed gummy hair to save it. You need to fill the protein back into your hair. You would do this every 6 weeks. Also keep deep conditioning after this to build your hair back with moisture. Coconut oil is a great one to use and most people here use it. A hairdresser will chop it off when she/he sees the damage ...be careful. Try Aphogee FIRST. I speak from experience.

^^^^^^^^!!!!This stuff saved about 80% of my hair in 2011 when I over bleached my hair. Do this treatment first then get your hair cut. You will need to do heavy protein and hydrating treatments after and cones are your friend till you can grow the damaged hair out. Beyond the Zone's 'last call' treatment is a good hair masque that I like when my hair is fried. They have a new one that I've heard great things about as well but never had to use cause I quit using bleach.

Shibe
July 20th, 2014, 07:08 PM
I had the same issue back in High School, and ended up chopping my hair to my ears.

Hair grows back, and in a few months it'll look drastically different.

kganihanova
July 20th, 2014, 09:33 PM
If I were you I'd just cut the damage in one go.......

queenovnight
July 21st, 2014, 03:00 PM
Well, you should go to a salon and ask them yourself. Keep in mind, this is the field they studied in. While it seems like a hard job, this is what they signed up for. So don't feel like a burden. Anywho! How short is your hair? You could try cutting it to about shoulder length and maintain there until the worst of the damage is gone. When I was growing out chemically damaged hair, I maintained at a certain length and trimmed monthly. Sometimes several times a month.