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View Full Version : tension/tightness of coil for cinnabun



sarahthegemini
July 19th, 2014, 03:58 PM
How tightly do you coil your hair for a cinnabun? I feel like I have to coil not super tight but fairly snug in order for it to be secure. When I coil loosely, it only stays in place for about an hour and then it starts to come away from my scalp, it actually wobbles if I move my head side to side. I've tried inserting the spin pins in different positions and the only way I can get a bun to hold at all is by inserting 2 pins horizontally - one at the top of the bun and one at the bottom. Any tips on how to coil looser whilst still having stability? My worry is that not coiling loosely will cause damage. Is that only an issue if coiling very tightly?

ooglipoo
July 19th, 2014, 04:04 PM
I coil tighter at the beginning, for the first loop, and then less so for the subsequent rounds... :D

kaydana
July 19th, 2014, 04:12 PM
Depends what I'm securing it with. The more stabby objects in my hair, the looser I can twist it. A hairstick requires a really tight bun to have any chance of staying up at all, a pair of sticks needs a relatively snug bun, but not tight. A two prong fork can be slightly looser than for a pair of sticks, a three prong fork can be really loose, and a four prong fork will hold anything that's vaguely bun shaped.

Zebra Fish
July 19th, 2014, 04:33 PM
Depends what I'm securing it with. The more stabby objects in my hair, the looser I can twist it. A hairstick requires a really tight bun to have any chance of staying up at all, a pair of sticks needs a relatively snug bun, but not tight. A two prong fork can be slightly looser than for a pair of sticks, a three prong fork can be really loose, and a four prong fork will hold anything that's vaguely bun shaped.

Now you got me intrigued! I still can't make it to do cinnamon bun. And I never managed to make a fork work... Guess I need one to try now :p

(sorry for thread hijack)

shinyspoon3
July 19th, 2014, 04:42 PM
I think tightly coiled buns are only a problem if you have already damaged hair, or you put it up damp. That being said, the best way I have found to put up loose coils is to position the bun very high so my head supports the weight instead of my slippery hair, and secure as I go with bobby pins. Nothing else holds my loose coils for very long. My hair texture is different than yours though, so maybe you'll have better luck.

Firefox7275
July 19th, 2014, 05:34 PM
I start tight for a quarter or half circle and then loose for the remainder. I use three Spin Pins in a Y configuration, angling them towards the scalp initially then perpendicular catching scalp hair. At the end I tighten all three pins which makes the whole bun very secure yet the hairline is not strained.

lapushka
July 19th, 2014, 05:56 PM
Maybe try a lazy wrap bun, to switch it up and see if that holds better. In my case a cinnamon bun doesn't hold very well yet (I need more length), so a lazy wrap bun is the perfect solution and it does hold better!

torrilin
July 19th, 2014, 06:46 PM
While the cinnabun seems to be a common first try bun, it's not the easiest thing to get to hold. Hypnotica (4ypn0tica on Youtube) is a member here with slippery and straight hair, and if slipping is a problem, her youtube tutorials seem to be helpful for a lot of people. The older the video, the shorter her hair, so you'd want ones that are pretty old like the Hypno bun and the Artemis. Both of those should be doable with fairly short hair and a range of tools. I've done them with spin pins and a 2 prong fork in addition to hairsticks.

Since you're mentioning that your hairstyle tends to wobble... there is a bit of a trick to catching enough scalp hair to secure your hairstyle. Insert the pin or hair stick or fork pointing AWAY from the bun, and then go down towards your scalp, use the toy to scoop up some scalp hair and flip it so it's now pointed towards the bun.

Depending on how your hands/hair/brain work, thinking of "sewing" the hair toy into your hair may work better for you.

chen bao jun
July 19th, 2014, 08:55 PM
Depends what I'm securing it with. The more stabby objects in my hair, the looser I can twist it. A hairstick requires a really tight bun to have any chance of staying up at all, a pair of sticks needs a relatively snug bun, but not tight. A two prong fork can be slightly looser than for a pair of sticks, a three prong fork can be really loose, and a four prong fork will hold anything that's vaguely bun shaped.
Exactly, that's why I love my four prong jeter.
My 'cinnamon bun' has just one twirl to it at this point (maybe it's actually a bee butt) and my lazy wrap is tiny. The disc bun is my friend--that holds well with twirly sticks like mamacats and ketylos, though I don't have slippery hair at all, twirls help with the fact that there's just not that much hair as of yet and sort of 'pin it down'

HaMalka
July 19th, 2014, 09:16 PM
I have the same problem with getting cinnamon buns to stay up. I have never been able to keep them up with just hair pins but I used to be able to do it with a tight coil and a pair of hair sticks. Now I'm finding that I simply have too much hair for for my way to hold. I've found that the tighter the bun is wound ad the more hair sticks holding it up (my record is 6) the better it stays.

woodswanderer
July 19th, 2014, 09:56 PM
Well, I just got my first 4 prong fork for my early birthday and it is something of a revelation to me. My bun used to wobble after a short amount of time but it is secure now. I had wobble issues with sticks and spin pins.

PerkyCurlz
July 20th, 2014, 04:49 AM
I think length and hair type play a big role in how tightly you have to coil. When my hair was your length I had to coil fairly tightly and use at least 4 spin pins, or a couple of hairsticks and a couple of spin pins, to keep my cinnabun in place. And I couldn't figure out how to get a fork to hold my cinnabun at that length. Ever since I got to just above waist, I can coil it more loosely and still keep it secure with just a couple of sticks (sometimes just one) or a fork. Maybe because my bun is bigger and I have more room to "sew" bun hair to my scalp?

Anje
July 20th, 2014, 07:19 AM
I can hold a loose, blob-like cinnamon bun with a ficcare. Just about anything else would require lots of progressive pinning. At TB+ with hair on the thinner side of ii, there are just too many spirals to hold without making sure I get all the loops. (Else, the cinnamon turns into a disorganized bee-buttish mess.) Center-held buns, Celtic knots, etc. hold a lot easier these days, even fairly loose.

lapushka
July 20th, 2014, 07:40 AM
Also, a cinnabun for me, is the hardest bun to do so it stays in place. Maybe because I don't have enough length yet. You always have to figure in your length and thickness level!

tetisheri72
July 20th, 2014, 06:29 PM
I still can't get one to hold. I always end up coiling it too tightly and it hurts.

Gertrude
July 22nd, 2014, 05:25 AM
I am having a weird thing happening with my cinnabuns lately. It used to be my favourite bun. I have BSL hair, very fine, and tightly coiled I can put it in a cinnabun with a three prong fork. On day 3 hair. If I use a four prong normally it can be coiled a little looser.

The last few weeks I coil, the fork goes in, the bun holds for hours and then one side just uncoils itself. With some torque. Unwinds. Causing half a bun still holding in the fork and a sheaf of hair. I do have very blunt ends as the GM stylist trims it the same length all around, so slight U shape, hard for buns, but I had that before.

Has anyone else had this cinnabun problem? Any suggestions?

schnibbles
July 22nd, 2014, 08:06 AM
No cinnabuns for me. I think my problem is the weight is not balanced/distributed evenly enough.

lapushka
July 22nd, 2014, 08:17 AM
I strongly encourage you, if you have problems with a cinnabun, try a lazy wrap bun. To me, it is so much more secure and it won't come undone as much as a cinnabun will.

StellaKatherine
July 22nd, 2014, 08:19 AM
I can hold a loose, blob-like cinnamon bun with a ficcare. Just about anything else would require lots of progressive pinning. At TB+ with hair on the thinner side of ii, there are just too many spirals to hold without making sure I get all the loops. (Else, the cinnamon turns into a disorganized bee-buttish mess.) Center-held buns, Celtic knots, etc. hold a lot easier these days, even fairly loose.

Same here. Usually I need millions of boby pins to make my cinnamon bun stay in place. I was delighted to find out that Ficcare actually can keep my cinnamoon buns in place without adding any extra pins!!! :inlove:

sarahthegemini
July 22nd, 2014, 01:55 PM
Thank you for all the responses guys, all very insightful :-) I think perhaps I'm being overly cautious, I will continue to coil snugly, and just make sure it's not too tightly done. I do wish I could do other buns but I don't think I have enough length yet :(

Majorane
July 22nd, 2014, 01:58 PM
.....I think that what I thought was a cinnabun isn't a cinnabun, as I have no probs with almostbsl and a stick and my it'snotacinnabun. Whaddaya know, member since 2011 and still don't know the basics. Okay, that was offtopic, but needed to be said.
O.o