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Juliet's Silk
May 22nd, 2014, 03:56 AM
So I need the LHC wisdom of the flat ironing crowd here :lol:
After being unhappy with my hair for years now and after cutting ~10" recently and still not being happy with it, I decided I would try a flat iron for the first time in my life. I have never used heat styling on my hair before (even pre LHC, out of laziness) so I really, REALLY have no clue. I don't even own a blow dryer...
I bought a flat iron (medium price range) yesterday and now I should learn how to use it, right? I already own these heat protectant leave-ins (got them for free somewhere?), so that is set.

I really don't like how my hair looks when worn down - for the longest time I have battled with frizz and "clumping" of hair strands and the realization that my problems stem from the fact that my hair is not straight but 1c/"can I call this 2a" did not really help.
I just want the frizz toned down, but I don't want to get stick straight hair - I like the body waves I get from bunning. How would I go about that with a flat iron? Would it be enough to just iron the top layer of the hair? And could I achieve body waves through "turning" the flat iron while using it somehow? How about the temperature? I think I would use it at really low, would that suffice? What happens if there is oil on the hair when you flat iron it? Is this good or a nono? I usually use some oil (camellia or coconut) on the lengths after washing, so that would still be there when flat ironing.

I have watched a lot of youtube videos about it but what these girls do to their hair is hard to watch for someone accustomed to LHC handling :lol: and most of them don't seem to really know what they're doing, so I thought it better to ask you.

I'm not too concerned about damage - my hair looks trashed as it is anyway even though it is completely virgin "LHC approved" hair, so if I could get healthy looking but actually damaged hair, I'd gladly take it. ;) As it is, I only ever wear a bun and this is boring me to death. :taz:

Any other tips you can share with me?

Lyv
May 22nd, 2014, 04:07 AM
If I use my flat iron I use it in big sections to just sort of smooth it down instead of straightening it and I use it on the lowest heat. I would wait until after you do it to use oils, the only time I didn't it smoked a little and it totally freaked me out lol. As for waves/curls if I use the flat iron I clamp it like usual and then flip it over and pull it down the section of hair. The smaller the section the tighter the wave.

Weewah
May 22nd, 2014, 04:27 AM
Don't do oils until after you iron. Think about what oil does when you cook food, it totally fries the food. I have no more advice to give on safe flat ironing since I quit ironing 6 months ago. :\

midbackorbust
May 22nd, 2014, 06:26 AM
I'll tell you what I can but it's been a couple of years since I straightened so you might want to take all this with a grain of salt:

-you don't want to use oils before as others mentioned, also be sure to not hold the iron still on a section for too long. Think multiple long swipes over big pieces.
-depending on just how naturally curly your hair is just straightening the top layer/s might look a bit odd
-yes, you can absolutely get waves from a flat iron, you can even get curls! I would try wrapping the hair loosely around the iron, depending on how big the waves are and spraying on some hairspray to hold the wave.

Good luck!

MINAKO
May 22nd, 2014, 06:36 AM
*pops her knuckles* ;)
I highly disagree with buying a random iron in the medium price range to begin with, sure they are not all as bad as it get's but still perform so differently that i wouldn't wat to risk it. The only acceptable one i came across was in fact one by Philips that i recieved as a gift, but still it's nothing i would use regularly. After all it's a tool that in the past had the potential to majorly wreck peoples hair in the past. So far i hated all but less than a handful. I would suggest a Cloud9 or GlamPalm to ensure maximum results with a minimum of damage, the Steampod by Rowenta also works great in retaining moisture.
Apart from that, for the typical bun body wave, a wideplate iron would be more suitable, as the slimmer ones create something more of a ribbon curls when turned, however its possible to put less tension on the stroke and learn to handle it for the pattern not to be as tight.
Give the iron half a turn downwards when you reach the ears and go slowly all the way to the ends guiding the strand with your other hand, more than half a turn would be likely to result in more of a ringlet too.

At all costs, avoid an remins of oils that arent suitable for the temperature, grapeseed oil is said be be somewhat of a natural heatprotectant, but i don't trust any natural oils at all since we are not just blowdrying here but working with direct heat, so a weewah said, apply them afterwards.
A great heat protectant is John Friedas 3Day Straight, or the Elnett Heat Styling Spray, but many of other brands come in a likewise combination of stuff that contains a heat resistant protein to strenghten the hair while you're at it and lock in the style for longer. Avedas Smooth Infusion Line is also great if monster shine but still somewhat of a natural volume is what you are after. I use a combination of both.

I let my hair airdry in braids and only use the blowdryer with a nozzle attachment to dry damp spots that might have been left, i simply don't see a reason to apply heat twice. If the iron is good, it will perform nonetheless. Personally i use 210C, but i have very resistant hair, it might fry somebody elses, so start at around 150C and see if you like the result, going lower you might as well don't do anything as the hair is most probably going to revert quickly.

Another option to consider would be a hotbrush with oar bristles, it's not bad and that's what i would use for a touchup. Unfortunately they are hard to find, i used a Rusk but it broke like three times and was also catching my hair in the vent where the air goes in, not good, lol. There's one from a brand called L'Azzio i found on ebay, but i can't give an opinion on that as i did not yet try it myself.

Anyhow, don't overdo it and keep the moisture in check in between straightening. This might all come acros as a harsh warning, but doing this stuff is certainly fun if you master it. Have fun and good luck! :o

Dreams_in_Pink
May 22nd, 2014, 07:03 AM
I'm not an avid heat user myself, but i like watching hair straightening videos (for some odd reason LOL )
you can comb and iron the section at the same time, so that you flatten the hair before running the iron over it. Something like this could be useful: http://www.amazon.com/Amika-Professional-Hair-Straightening-Comb/dp/B004NHVT92/ref=sr_1_29?ie=UTF8&qid=1400760173&sr=8-29&keywords=blow+dry+comb

ETA: Women with tight curls or kinky hairtype tend to give the best flatiron advice on straightening. You might want to browse youtube tutorials they made :)

ErinLeigh
May 22nd, 2014, 11:29 AM
They have crimping irons now that have big S shaped bumps that create interesting wave effects.
Not like the old school V shaped crimps. This option could give you the smooth heat effect but volume and wave but with ease.

Steam rollers could be a great option. They really can give hair a gorgeous, full, bouncy, wavy, smooth look.

You could also damp bun and once dry just take the select pieces that aren't laying right and curl them a bit with an iron to match the bun waves. Spray the heat protect on the dry stands before ironing and make the passes quick. Great tutorials on YouTube for creating wave with irons. As far as temperature, For fine hair 200 or lower. Start low and work you way up to what works. I usually did mine right around 200.

Other than that, can never top minako's response. She covered it all. Very good post.

I wish you the best in finding a style you can do with ease and enjoy.
If you are going to heat style I would look Into some products targeted for damaged or heat styled hair. Also I would add deep treatments to routine if you don't already to help keep hair moisturized to combat the dryness of ironing.
As far as the oils, I would use them for finishing or prepoos if you plan on ironing. For heat styling, cones become your friend.

meteor
May 22nd, 2014, 11:32 AM
The short answer is: always use the highest quality heat protectant on completely dry hair and apply the heat protectant very thoroughly (it's hard to ensure that no hair surface is left exposed to heat), use the highest quality flat-iron and only in very quick passes (never pass twice), and preferably only on face-framing canopy hair.


But my full and honest answer is this: the best way to use a flat iron is... not to use a flat iron.
If you are unhappy with your virgin hair, heat damaged hair will mostly look worse. It's addictive as in: looks good right after you've done it but needs more and more heat just to look decent later. Heat is not the way to get better hair, it's the way to get picture-perfect hair for a specific event only - the long-term price for using heat frequently is that hair looks worse and needs even more heat. You say you want the frizz to calm down... well, heat will give you a lot more frizz in the long run, as frizz is either damage or unrecognized and not properly handled wave/curl pattern. If your hair is virgin but still frizzy, you might be wavier than you thought or your routine/tools/products might not be right for your hair type.

I've noticed, your hair goal states "thick" - so I really recommend checking out this thread where LHC-ers report that they got new bangs growing in and increased ponytail circumference after ditching heat for good: http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=118382 If you want to grow your hair to its genetic potential, high heat is not your friend.


I'm not too concerned about damage - my hair looks trashed as it is anyway even though it is completely virgin "LHC approved" hair, so if I could get healthy looking but actually damaged hair, I'd gladly take it. ;) As it is, I only ever wear a bun and this is boring me to death. :taz:
Try all forms of wet-setting overnight. They are great, effective, free and absolutely safe and non-damaging. I never get any frizz with them, as long as I release the style after it has dried completely. I highly recommend no-heat styling tutorials by Beautyklove - http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCp2Fm1fzjSAMmlnZ8F-C1nA. And you can find a ton of good ideas on how to straighten hair without heat on Youtube: head-wrapping, caterpillar braids, wrapping a scarf/ribbon/nylon... And getting no-heat smooth waves and curls is even easier and there are endless wet-setting methods out there and they can give you different sizes of curls, depending on what you like, unlike a one-size curler or flat-iron.

Juliet's Silk
May 23rd, 2014, 04:22 AM
Thanks for your advice everyone! My flat iron will be delivered today, hopefully, let's see what I can do with it. If my hair decides to cooperate later on, that is...

Minako, now that you mention it I vaguely remember that I owned one of those hot brushes ages ago (as a teen), but I also remember that I hated it with a passion. I distinctly remember that it ripped more hair out than it did good, so I'll definitely be staying away from that. ;) The flat iron will hopefully not rip hairs out at least (even though I came across a lot of reviews who said that flat irons do in fact do that, but I hope I'll get a quality one that won't, or I'll return it).
Btw, I didn't buy a "random" flat iron ;) I did my research beforehand of course. It just didn't make sense to me to buy an expensive premium flat iron when I don't even know if I'd like it. That's why I went with a medium priced one. If I like it I can still go all out and buy a GHD one (or whatever the premium thingie is called).

Dreams_in_Pink + ErinLeigh do you know of any good flat iron video on youtube? I enjoy watching these beauty videos as well but when it comes to hair, most of them are just bad IMHO. I'm sure that there are knowledgeable youtubers out there, though, I just haven't found them yet?

meteor, I know you mean well, but I've been at this hair growing thing close to 10 years now. Of course the frizz I have stems from the fact that my hair is quite-but-not-really wavy. I'm sure there is the one miracle product or miracle routine out there that I haven't tried yet and that would completely change my hair for the better. But I still haven't found it and frankly, I'm tired of searching. I'm tired of not being able to wear my hair down when I want to because it looks so bad. I'm tired of putting all that work into it, only to wear a bun day in day out - if I wear a bun anyway, who cares if my hair is damaged or not?
I've always dreamt of having shiny bouncy TBL hair but the reality is that my hair simply isn't made for that and all the LHC won't change it. Years of maintaining at TBL showed me that. Guess I should change the goal in my profile, then, it's a bit outdated... If I can't have that, I can at least have fun with my hair at shorter lengths. At this point, I don't care if this damages my hair, because as I said, it's in a bun day in and out anyway, so who cares? If this is so damaging that I have to go much shorter because of breakage I might reconsider but if I never try, I'll never know. Hair will grow again.
I guess my perspective is a bit different from most people here because I've been maintaining my length for 6-7 years now I think and I know that it will grow back if I do something to it that I don't like. :)
And maybe a bit of damage will stop my hair from being so slippery, that'd be a nice side effect too. :p

MINAKO
May 23rd, 2014, 04:32 AM
The brush was tricky to handle, but it didn't rip out any hairs on me ( apart from those being sucked into the vent, lol), anyways, i just thought i would mention it as i'm still looking for one myself to do touch ups. But those with treal boar bristles are really hard to find :/

Ah, i'm sure there are a few good irons out there, i happened to become really anal about it tho, i even hated GHD. SO i wouldn't suggest that to anybody.

ErinLeigh
May 23rd, 2014, 04:49 AM
quick beach waves
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1hRRp2FzAwA

curls
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iaQq4Rec8MU

curls (skip to 3:19)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L3RcMgNFsMc

These will give you a good idea of how to work the iron.

Juliet's Silk
May 23rd, 2014, 05:26 AM
ErinLeigh these are awesome, thanks!

redredrobin
May 23rd, 2014, 06:09 AM
Thanks for your advice everyone! My flat iron will be delivered today, hopefully, let's see what I can do with it. If my hair decides to cooperate later on, that is...

Minako, now that you mention it I vaguely remember that I owned one of those hot brushes ages ago (as a teen), but I also remember that I hated it with a passion. I distinctly remember that it ripped more hair out than it did good, so I'll definitely be staying away from that. ;) The flat iron will hopefully not rip hairs out at least (even though I came across a lot of reviews who said that flat irons do in fact do that, but I hope I'll get a quality one that won't, or I'll return it).
Btw, I didn't buy a "random" flat iron ;) I did my research beforehand of course. It just didn't make sense to me to buy an expensive premium flat iron when I don't even know if I'd like it. That's why I went with a medium priced one. If I like it I can still go all out and buy a GHD one (or whatever the premium thingie is called).

Dreams_in_Pink + ErinLeigh do you know of any good flat iron video on youtube? I enjoy watching these beauty videos as well but when it comes to hair, most of them are just bad IMHO. I'm sure that there are knowledgeable youtubers out there, though, I just haven't found them yet?

meteor, I know you mean well, but I've been at this hair growing thing close to 10 years now. Of course the frizz I have stems from the fact that my hair is quite-but-not-really wavy. I'm sure there is the one miracle product or miracle routine out there that I haven't tried yet and that would completely change my hair for the better. But I still haven't found it and frankly, I'm tired of searching. I'm tired of not being able to wear my hair down when I want to because it looks so bad. I'm tired of putting all that work into it, only to wear a bun day in day out - if I wear a bun anyway, who cares if my hair is damaged or not?
I've always dreamt of having shiny bouncy TBL hair but the reality is that my hair simply isn't made for that and all the LHC won't change it. Years of maintaining at TBL showed me that. Guess I should change the goal in my profile, then, it's a bit outdated... If I can't have that, I can at least have fun with my hair at shorter lengths. At this point, I don't care if this damages my hair, because as I said, it's in a bun day in and out anyway, so who cares? If this is so damaging that I have to go much shorter because of breakage I might reconsider but if I never try, I'll never know. Hair will grow again.
I guess my perspective is a bit different from most people here because I've been maintaining my length for 6-7 years now I think and I know that it will grow back if I do something to it that I don't like. :)
And maybe a bit of damage will stop my hair from being so slippery, that'd be a nice side effect too. :p

Hello Juliet's Silk. It's interesting to read about your hair journey. I'm growing out damage and not particularly happy with the way my hair looks (I don't use heat any more). If it doesn't improve when my virgin hair grows out, I would also be looking for alternatives.

The other day someone commented on my very dry ends and that I needed a trim. My ends tend to look dry just before washing especially if I haven't oiled. I thought to myself, if I had washed, blowdried/straightened, my hair would not look dry and I would not have received that comment. And yet it would be exactly the same hair (actually a bit more damaged in the long run).

Juliet's Silk
May 23rd, 2014, 06:50 AM
Hello Juliet's Silk. It's interesting to read about your hair journey. I'm growing out damage and not particularly happy with the way my hair looks (I don't use heat any more). If it doesn't improve when my virgin hair grows out, I would also be looking for alternatives.

Well, who knows? I think it is fascinating to see how hair changes once one starts to take proper care of it the LHC way - in almost all cases (including mine) it gets a lot wavier after a while. But I think one also has to keep in mind that not all of us have it in our genes to grow thick glorious locks that conforms to "normal" beauty standards all by itself. I certainly don't. That's okay - the beauty industry has a lot of options for hair like mine ;) And while it's certainly detrimental to the goal of extremely long hair, if you don't want to have that, or can't reach it anyway, why not use them?
I don't have any more advice to offer obviously because I'm out of the LHC game for a while now. But in your case, give yourself at least enough time to see what your hair is like when it's all virgin without any damage. You'll be surprised, I promise. I certainly was and I wasn't even growing out damage to begin with...


The other day someone commented on my very dry ends and that I needed a trim. My ends tend to look dry just before washing especially if I haven't oiled. I thought to myself, if I had washed, blowdried/straightened, my hair would not look dry and I would not have received that comment. And yet it would be exactly the same hair (actually a bit more damaged in the long run).

Yes, that's a problem I have as well. Most non-LHC people see frizzy hair/dry looking ends as damage, even if it really isn't. It looks the same, but if you touch it, you know the difference immediately. I know that my hair is healthy as can be because I know how silky it is compared to other people. But they'll never know (and I don't want random people touching my hair anyway, heh).


The flat iron was delivered just now btw. It looks a bit intimidating. My hair has dried though so maybe I'll go experimenting a bit.

Beborani
May 23rd, 2014, 09:01 AM
Juliet silk enjoy your flat iron and if you like it buy a better quality one--that is what i did a few years ago and I wouldnt trade that experience at all for virgin hair. Now I don't because I am growing my hair (different stage of hair journey) bur I would happily return to it if I was keeping it shorter. i had no visible damage and I am sure bottom third of my hair has seen plenty of flat ironing and it isnt any worse for the wear. And if it gets bad in the future there are always scissors. That said I also had a good curly hair routine so I switched between the two.

MINAKO
May 23rd, 2014, 09:36 AM
...there are always scissors.

http://smiley.nowdararpour.ir/happy/108.gif
Dead ends do happen sooner or later anyways, but people often call them heat damage if a tool was involved so they can put the blame on something else: Let#s be honest, most of the cases where it goes really wrong are about previous bleaching, multiple coloring, and hot tools like once a day.

I wanted to add, Alyway check your iron on a piece of paper ladies, no matter what price range. ;)

Juliet's Silk
May 23rd, 2014, 10:16 AM
http://smiley.nowdararpour.ir/happy/108.gif
I wanted to add, Alyway check your iron on a piece of paper ladies, no matter what price range. ;)

What do you mean by that, what would I be checking for?

I did use the iron btw, and yeah well I need more practice. Much more practice... And a better heat protectant, the one I have now I really don't like.

MINAKO
May 23rd, 2014, 10:26 AM
I mean that there could be a fault in the temeperature control of the iron due to faulty manufacturing, short curcuit or simply usage.
So i clamp a piece of paper between the plates for like 15sec. after it says it's ready, just to make sure it doesn't get hotter than it actually displays. Paper burns/turns brown at 451F, so does hair! Means, it its bad for the paper its certainly too hot.

ETA: If this happens i would be worried about the tool i mean, of course there a many temperatures below that would be too hot as well for this or that hairtype. But at least you want to know that you work with what you expect to.

Juliet's Silk
May 23rd, 2014, 10:33 AM
Ah thanks for explaining! I'm going to do that right now.
I don't really like the flat iron I got, it doesn't display the temperature at all (you choose temperature by indicating your hair type and the device chooses the "right temperature" for you). I thought I wouldn't care about that but it somehow bothers me that I can't "control" the temperature. I guess. Not that it would be much different if it gave me a temperature value I still wouldn't know if it were true but still.
I think I might go with the pricer model after all, hmmm.

MINAKO
May 23rd, 2014, 10:50 AM
Temperature control would be the most important thing next to the plates itself of course. I mean, it costs a company more to include one, but if its there, it should work.
Think about cooking and how temperature can mean hit or miss. Thats the point, we don't actually wanna fry it. My hair can stand alot of heat, but still i do this test everytime. It takes a few second but if the wrst case happens it's not your hair thats burning first.

Juliet's Silk
May 23rd, 2014, 11:08 AM
Well I don't really think that the temperature notification would be more accurate anyway - it's just a choice to display "bars" rather than "temperature" and if you don't know which temperature would be okay for your hair anyway, it doesn't really matter what the thing displays. I don't even think it would cost more because the device needs to have a temperature control anyway. In that, I think the design is actually quite okay from a dumb customer point of view because if someone with fine hair but without a clue goes about using it, she wouldn't simply choose a "medium" temperature (say 180C if the device can go up to 230C) that might be too hot for her hair. Instead she would go with the "fine hair" option that might heat up the device to only 150C that would be okay (I'm pulling numbers out of thin air here, mind you). I don't know. :shrug: It's just control and it bothers me because I like to know exactly what's going on, but it's not like this cheapens the product. I'll switch it to the other model of the same product line which does show temperature (but apparently, does not have "color control" (for colored hair) however that is supposed to be achieved anyway, lol).
Btw, even on the hottest setting, the paper did not discolor. Thanks for writing about this trick!

MINAKO
May 23rd, 2014, 11:55 AM
I think not everybody who straightens their hair actually makes a science out of it, so those hairtype sorted settings will be kinda ok.
I think a digital temperature control is more expensive in production tho, but also a normal one that just goes with fixed numbers needs to translate watt output to degrees celcius or fahrenheit somehow. My hair for example does straighten at 210 C, which would just be setting 3 on another iron, but 3 could also mean 195C or 230C which would be too hot. So i feel safer with a unit that doesn't change from one brand to another.

But it's also the plates, if they are good you can actually turn the iron a but down and it should still give better results than an iron with not so good plates that get hotter.
Some of them really help protecting the cuticle during the process and moisture imbalance is something i can fix, or most of it.

And don't give up on the technique, it took me ages to get the flatironing right in general and quiet a few attempts to get something like uniform waves.

chen bao jun
May 23rd, 2014, 01:23 PM
Interesting discussion ladies.
there's another forum which I will not name in case I am trangressing rules (it has a very similar name to ours) which is 99% black ladies with type 3c or type 4 hair and a huge proportion of them flatiron. they have it down to a science and you see a lot of waist or hip length hair over there that looks very healthy so I know its possible to flat iron without damage that means you need to cut your hair off, and to have your hair looking the way you want, if you either don't like your curls or else want to vary your hairstyle.
I am done with flat ironing personally (gave mine away) but if I weren't I would also never have a flat iron without the temperature readings and MINAKO is right, you need to test with the piece of paper. In the old hot iron days, when people heated the thing on the stove, directly in the fire, they always tested on paper or on toilet tissue for those burn marks and then let cool down if brown marks appeared on the paper.

What I had was a Chi knockoff by Sally. It can't be too bad because my friend loves it now. I used mostly to have a very skilled beautician do it though and she had one of the expensive flat irons. Still took her more than an hour to flat iron me each time, she and an assistant BOTH using flat irons at the same time. and 210 degrees does nothing for my hair. 350 degrees to get this straight (after its half straight from being blow dried). But I have resistant and non-porous hair and very coarse strands.
I also don't damage easily thank goodness--I had that routine for years and plus poor washing skills and still had bra strap length hair consistently. Well, that's not quite true. My hair felt terrible, but it looked great. Nobody could tell it was damaged and I didn't know any better. It's all about what you want.

Never liked myself with straight hair and did it because of social pressure, but everyone's tastes are different in this regard, there is no 'right' or 'wrong.' A lot of people look great with pressed hair (like you, Minako).

MINAKO
May 24th, 2014, 07:32 AM
Thank you for joining in chen bao jun. Yes i have seen quiet a few ladies over there with fairly healthy hip length afro textured hair. It's totally possible if the rest of the routine fits around it. Some do only straighten once a month and can go forever in between washes, but most wear it natural in between i guess.

The 210 i was mentioning was celcius, haha, if it was fahrenheit, it also did nothing for me. So 410F for comparison. Actually i could turn the heat down to 350 and get it straight but the style locks in better with a bit more and it takes less passes which is also a good thing, never more than two.
I think heat styling is fun, and it shows in coarser, curlier textures how well we have truly been taking care of our hair. Makes me kind of proud to see the results every time i do it, and hey, i thought i had the dryest and most difficult hair in the world but made it this far without any visible damage.
However brand we choose, the iron should never cause friction that you could still feel on the scalp, i had this with my first handful of irons, that hair would start "humming" towards the ends like violin strings or even get snagged by the plates at the very end, bad bad thing. Ceramic or tourmaline infused titanium plates which float onto each other are sure something that needs to be on the list

Yes, it's always a question of taste, especially when it comes to bone straight, but it enhances the asian features on me, which are sort of getting lost in nowhere when i have it wavy.

Juliet's Silk
May 26th, 2014, 08:10 AM
Sigh, the forum really doesn't like me today, it won't let me quote properly...


My hair for example does straighten at 210 C, which would just be setting 3 on another iron, but 3 could also mean 195C or 230C which would be too hot. So i feel safer with a unit that doesn't change from one brand to another.
Yeah, I hadn't thought about that, that is certainly something to consider.

Maybe I'll stay with the "bar display" iron after all, I'm too lazy to exchange it and I kind of like it except for the display. I also really liked how my hair looked - it didn't get frizz free but I put it in a bun afterwards and when taking that out, my hair was laying so nicely with cute ringlets at the bottom. I bet I won't be able to repeat that but I really liked it and how my hair looked and felt in general.
I'll practice a bit more tomorrow :nods:

Do you have any recommendation regarding the heat protectant? After discovering that mine basically consists of water and alcohol (it's a hair stylist brand supposedly expensive but I got it for free from somewhere) I went to the drugstore to get something else but they were all like that, except for one that had a silicone at the first place on the list but was really expensive. I don't really get it - if you mustn't flat iron wet/damp hair, why use a heat protectant that mainly consists of water? Isn't that really counterproductive?

MINAKO
May 26th, 2014, 08:48 AM
If in doubt about the bar display on the temperature, put the setting you would choose, take some shed hair and literally try to fry the crap out of it, if it crinkles, changes color or simply smells burnt, too hot. I usually just do the paper thing as dont always keep a ball of shed hair at hand, lol, but it gives you more safety in the process i guess and once you found the setting, should be fine.

Heat Porectant... i know everyone on YT is recommending Tresemme, i never tried it. But from my expirience i would say John Frieda 3Day Straight is the best (for my hair) It gives very glossy and lasting result, plus a little goes along way. Then there's Elnett Satin Heat protect, kind of similar but a bit more hold not stiff tho. Aveda Smooth Infusion Glossing Straightener (serum, damn shiny, but not as lasting) Chi silk infusion (also a serum). You could also try Pantene and Dove, i think they deliver in the styling segment. I spritz lightly and then add a peasize of a serum to the ends.
They spray sure has water as a first ingredient, but leave it on for like 5-10 Min before you get to work so it kinda evaporates, its the cones in the end that do the job. Dimethicone and cyclometicone or something similar are mandatory i would say, should have a bit of hydrolized whatsoever protein in it as well, maybe some panthenol too. Just a few things to look out for when you stumble across a brand you would like to try.