PDA

View Full Version : How to moisturize a super dry itchy scalp?



Soullurre
April 25th, 2014, 12:50 AM
I've been battling with an itchy dry scalp and nothing has helped much but for Cetaphil Gentle Cleanser but my scalp will itch like crazy if I don't reapply this stuff often. I've been to a dermatologist recently and told him that I've tried anti-dandruff shampoos, natural sulfate free shampoos, all types of oils and no relief. So he gave me a prescription for $200 stuff and still the stuff made me itch worse. It was Keta something shampoo and Flu something ointment or liquid. I don't like the idea of using steroids so I was quite mad that this stuff made me itch more. I see him again in June. I now have bump sores on certain areas of my scalp and it hurts, it's probably from scratching with a comb. I don't like to scratch with my nails. But yeah, is there any relief? I'm losing it over here.

lapushka
April 25th, 2014, 01:14 AM
Have you tried applying oils to your scalp, or adding oil to a mild shampoo or conditioner wash? Castor oil (in your case) comes to mind as it is a very thick and moisturizing oil. If that doesn't help, maybe mineral oil will (might make your hair greasy).

adler
April 25th, 2014, 01:45 AM
It may not be the same but every winter I have the worst dry flaky scalp. What I did this past winter seemed to work wonderfully because I had almost no problems with it. First I exfoliated about once a week. At walgreens they have this flat palm comb but are called scalp massages. Another idea would be make an olive oil, honey and brown sugar scrub.

usually right after exfoliating I would put on heated olive:avocado:castor oil and let it sit for at least an hour (over night works better). These oils can penetrate hair and skin better and many others and the addition of the olive and avocado make castor more manageable. Another good combo I found was heated coconut an olive (extra virgin by the way!)

I think the main key is to get rid of dead skin gently and use warm/hot oil vs. room temperature ones.

Mya
April 25th, 2014, 03:44 AM
My mom has a similar problem. Her scalp is so dry it will often itch terribly on the front and crown, and will be flaky in the same areas. She washes her hair once every few months and yet her hair never is greasy. She found relief in putting baby oil on the itchy areas of her scalp.

My thought is maybe dry scalps don't need to be shampooed to be clean and that on those scalps the strength of shampoo causes irritation. Have you tried CO wash? I think we are going to next time my mom washes her hair. Conditioners have some cleansing properties, yet they are not as aggressive as shampoos.

I'm watching this thread anyway to learn about other people's solutions.

I advise against products recommended by dermatologists since I always find those products to be not gentle at all (other than unfairly pricy). You may want to see other dermatologists (or see a trichologist instead) since, in my experience, it's hard for them to understand problems that don't really fit into "the norm" and each one of them gives different solutions for the same problem. That's also why I find the medical route to be long and hard and that sometimes it's easier to solve this kind of problems by yourself. If you want to continue on that route, it's best to not stick with a doctor until you really feel you found the right one.

I think the best products are those explicitly labeled as gentle or organic or for babies AND (more importantly!) that have as little ingredients as possible.

ErinLeigh
April 25th, 2014, 06:02 AM
Did the Dr say what was causing the dry scalp? Any diagnosis?
Without knowing its hard to guess but maybe monistat or neem oil will relieve the itching?

Soullurre
April 25th, 2014, 06:23 AM
Nope. He didn't make no diagnosis. He seemed to be in a rush cus there were a ton of people there. He just looked at me. Didn't touch my scalp, didn't examine. Just listened to what I told him about what problems I was having and just prescribed me stuff $200 wasted. I'm gonna try the baby oil and then wash my scalp with baby shampoo and see how this goes.

Wosie
April 25th, 2014, 06:59 AM
Sitting here with a dry, itchy scalp of flakes that snow down if I fluff my hair a little bit, I completely understand your woes. I will be following this thread as I'd like to get some help (any help) as well.

I will be taking a new allergy test a.s.a.p. Do you know if you have any allergies?
I have taken a few allergy tests in the past, but as it seems possible for me to get sudden new allergies I better take a new one soon, as I don't know what to avoid anymore (I suddenly got allergic to walnuts a few years ago and I never had any issues at all with them previously).

ErinLeigh
April 25th, 2014, 08:17 AM
Nope. He didn't make no diagnosis. He seemed to be in a rush cus there were a ton of people there. He just looked at me. Didn't touch my scalp, didn't examine. Just listened to what I told him about what problems I was having and just prescribed me stuff $200 wasted. I'm gonna try the baby oil and then wash my scalp with baby shampoo and see how this goes.

How frustrating. You deserved to have an examination to see what is causing this. If fungus than something like monistat could help. But you can't know! Gah!
Have you tried a cortisone cream just for some temporary relief? There are no open wounds are there?

Let us know how you baby oil/baby shampoo work.

red-again
April 25th, 2014, 10:00 AM
Just watch out with baby shampoo, you'd think it was one of the gentlest out there but actually it is very harsh. It is ipextremely alkaline and the scalp is naturally slightly acidic so it will be stripped by baby shampoo. I would advise a sulphate free shampoo - Aubrey or weleda are fab brands.

lapushka
April 25th, 2014, 10:15 AM
Just watch out with baby shampoo, you'd think it was one of the gentlest out there but actually it is very harsh. It is ipextremely alkaline and the scalp is naturally slightly acidic so it will be stripped by baby shampoo. I would advise a sulphate free shampoo - Aubrey or weleda are fab brands.

Seconding this. The milder the better if your scalp is dry and that flaky (from dryness?) and so I'd skip the baby shampoo as well. It's just another sulfate shampoo! Like any other. You probably would want to look for sulfate-free formulas. IF your scalp is indeed dry and it's not another problem like seborrheic dermatitis or something along those lines.

meteor
April 25th, 2014, 10:51 AM
Sorry to hear that the doctor didn't take your problem seriously. :( Ideally, it would be nice to get recommendations for a good dermatologist, but I know it's not always easy.
I agree with the mineral oil recommendation. It will moisturize (prevent moisture from evaporating too fast) but won't feed fungus/bacterial growth unlike oils rich in oleic acid, if you have this problem.

Have you tried aloe vera and honey? They are at least somewhat calming to scalp.
Also, if mineral oil doesn't work for you, have you tried neem oil, tea tree EO, castor oil, or any infused Ayurvedic Indian oils? Many of them target unspecified scalp issues and promote healthy hair growth.
In the long run, you'll need to identify shampoos that work for you, maybe fragrance/phthalates-free and hypoallergenic. Often (but not always) milder shampoos without SLS/SLES are recommended.


ETA: You can also try henna (if your hair is black or very dark and henna won't show) or cassia. Many people report that their scalps get much healthier thanks to henna. If you do, always do a strand and skin test first.

Nini
April 25th, 2014, 11:16 AM
I'd stay away from the baby shampoo, and try something without Sodium Laureth Sulfate. Many people react to that, myself included.

I'd also skip the baby oil I think, and rather go for one of the previously mentioned ones. If you have Extra Vergin Olive Oil at home you could try that.

Another thing you can try is to rinse with some Apple Cider Vinegar diluted in water.

And most importantly! Don't try out too much at once. Your goal is to eliminate whatever is causing your reaction.

jeanniet
April 25th, 2014, 01:48 PM
I know you said previously that you have OCD, so I'm wondering if that is contributing to the problem. How often are washing/rubbing/scrubbing/manipulating your scalp? Are you trying all kinds of different things in rapid succession? How many times did you try the prescription wash and ointment? If the doctor doesn't want to see you again until June, that tells me that what he prescribed probably takes 6-8 weeks to have full effect, so if you only tried it once or twice it didn't have a chance to work. Same thing with any other remedy you've tried--if you use something once or twice, then go on to something else, not only are you not giving things a chance to work, but you're probably irritating your scalp even more into the bargain. So if you can be specific about exactly what you've used, how you used it, and for how long each time, we'd have a better idea of what's going on. At this point, my advice would be to either use the prescription items for 6-8 weeks, or to just wash with a very mild wash (Cetaphil is probably not a bad choice) or plain water and not do anything else for at least a month. I think you're driving your scalp crazy, trying to do too much, and it needs to calm down.

AmberJewel
April 26th, 2014, 11:55 AM
I also have trouble with my scalp being dry and itchy. It's not so bad as it was, I think that's partially due to CO washing and trying to stretch washes. Even so, by day 3 I'm usually pretty itchy and flaky again. Doing a coconut oil scalp massage once a week and leaving it for at least an hour or two before washing seems to help. I also mix a little honey with my conditioner. The trick for me is to find that wonderful place of sufficient moisture while not looking greasy for the rest of the week. Still working on it.

eva888
April 26th, 2014, 12:09 PM
I had a really dry itchy scalp from bleach and the winter, and recently I have been doing a scalp massage with an oil blend every third day. It helps so much. It is a blend of a bunch of different oils but it is mostly jojoba oil and some others included are peppermint oil, tea tree oil, eucalyptus oil, etc.
Someone mentioned OCD, which I think I might have a mild form of as well. Anyway, try to nourish your scalp and then leave it alone for at least 48 hours. The body is a magical thing and does a great job at healing itself.
Hope you find relief soon!

Emichiee
April 26th, 2014, 08:46 PM
Sounds like it could be a few things:
- fungus -> Use anti fungal cream for at least three months (shampoos don't work as well)
- eczema -> Could be caused by a certain food, try an elimination diet like SIBO Paleo, Gaps
- Harsh products -> Switch to gentle detergent
- Allergy -> Could also be an allergy to a certain ingredient

I hope you can get some relief...it sounds a lot like the first two. You can try the cream first to see if it helps. It should work within a few weeks.

Eleonore
April 27th, 2014, 09:44 AM
I have ezcema and my boyfriend has psoriasis, both on the scalp, and we live by Rene Furterer's Astera Fresh Serum. It's a cooling and healing serum that instantly makes your scalp calm down - it actually chills it 2 degrees celsius. From the picture, you look like you might naturally have a very dry scalp. Have you tried ultra-hydrating shampoos and oils made from shea butter?

MINAKO
April 27th, 2014, 10:21 AM
I started using molasses on my Hair and did kind of expiiment with a facemask too. As far as i can tell it has been super moisturizing on both.

Soullurre
April 30th, 2014, 02:14 AM
I tried the baby oil and baby shampoo. The baby oil was a no-no. Then the shampoo a no-no. My mother called the dermatologist back and he told me to keep using it and to not put anything else on my scalp but what he prescribed. So, I'm stuck using the ketoconazole shampoo and fluocinonide liquid. And he told me I'm shedding more hair and have patchiness because I'm still post-partum and that my hormones haven't leveled themselves. I'm just over here wishing I had straight hair texture and that it would get oily. My boyfriend has awesome hair. He can just wash it with a bar of soap or any soap for that matter and have smooth easy to manage hair. I hate my hair texture and lack of sebum.

Rosa Harris
April 30th, 2014, 06:10 AM
I tried the baby oil and baby shampoo. The baby oil was a no-no. Then the shampoo a no-no. My mother called the dermatologist back and he told me to keep using it and to not put anything else on my scalp but what he prescribed. So, I'm stuck using the ketoconazole shampoo and fluocinonide liquid. And he told me I'm shedding more hair and have patchiness because I'm still post-partum and that my hormones haven't leveled themselves. I'm just over here wishing I had straight hair texture and that it would get oily. My boyfriend has awesome hair. He can just wash it with a bar of soap or any soap for that matter and have smooth easy to manage hair. I hate my hair texture and lack of sebum.

Our skin sounds a lot alike. I would give anything for oily skin, too. I know its sounds gross but I used to steal the oil of my ex's forehead. If you don't make enough oil you practically dream about oily. And dry makes curlies lose hair more because our hair is thin, fragile and has kinks in it that make it easier to break.

Post-partum does cause shedding but not usually enough to cause bald patches.

I tried all the ointments, shampoos, foams, creams and so on from my dermatologist to no end. I'd just stay away from that stuff if you can.

About scratching - pat or slap your itch gently. A quick sharp motion works best for me. That will keep from damaging the skin and it works.

When I found TLHC I was having dry issues, too. I actually have some skin problems but I also just don't make enough oil to keep from being super itchy. Also, when you don't have a natural oil barrier to block irritants all kinds of things other people can do will irritate the skin easily. All those ingredients you cant pronounce plus 'fragrances' are terrible.

Also, creams for normal 'dry skin' are just not effective enough. they are not gooey enough and don't have staying power.

This is what has helped me. I did a lot of looking into scientific studies to come up with this combination. Each one is documented effective.

I make a mix but any of these alone will actually help some.

my mix is:
3 oz of Natural 100percent pure raw shea butter
3 oz of natural 100 percent Coconut butter (not the oil the butter)
2 oz of Tea Tree oil

Throw it in a microwavable bowl for 2 minutes on high and then stir it till its all nice and melted. Pour it into a jar - I use an old jelly jar and shake occasionally till cool. It might have some grit to it when it cools if not shaken often enough but that is ok. The grit melts on the skin. It will be a thich creamy oily stuff with amazing staying power to keep you moist.

Shower but don't use hot water. No shampoo or soap. Dry skin you should at best use warm water. Slather the stuff on and put on a curl cap if you want. I love it all over since I a dry all over. The stuff holds in the moisture from the shower. You want to do it while you are still damp.

All ingredients have very good properties for a number of dry skin problems including psoriasis and eczema. The Tea Tree oil is especially good at taming itchies and a lot of folks use it for the itchies and irritation from cornrows and weaves. It is also very healing.

I bet your Mo would love this, too. Mine does. Its got a great ethnic scent but not a heavy cocobutter scent. Natural cocobutter does not smell so strong as the goop you get at the beauty supply that has fake fragrance oils added.

lapushka
April 30th, 2014, 09:29 AM
I tried all the ointments, shampoos, foams, creams and so on from my dermatologist to no end. I'd just stay away from that stuff if you can.

Sounds to me as if she's tried everything, exhausted her options. I say giving someone advice that goes against doctor's advice - on a forum, can potentially be dangerous, and I'd not do it!

tigereye
April 30th, 2014, 09:54 AM
How long has it been since you went to a dermatologist?
Mine makes me wait at least 4 months after a new prescription for my skin because the majority of skin meds take at least 3 months to show any improvement, and up to 6 to show a real good improvement if something is working. I last went in at the end of November. I'm now only just due back and will be getting my meds changed again because this stuff hasn't worked. I know with my acne, symptoms can often get worse before getting any better on meds, so you need to wait it out.
If you go back after a few months (at least 3) of using and your skin is still itching, do not leave the doctors place until he has examined you. He should examine you and perhaps takes a sample of the skin or sores to check for fungal infections. Don't settle for less just because they're "busy".

What I will suggest is to get an allergy test. I'm allergic to SLS, which gave me the exact symptoms you describe. It built up into itchy sores eventually which went away when I stopped using sulphates, but come back within two days if I use it by accident now. Though you've tried SLS-free, it could be something else entirely you're allergic to that produces those symptoms. It's worth checking out.

Lastly, do you live in a wet area, and how do you dry your hair after washing? Some people get itchiness from fungal infections if they bun their hair wet because the extended contact with water on the scalp can attract fungus. I've never had an issue since the discovery of my SLS allergy, but some people can have issues with wet-bunning and over-oiling over fungus wouldn't really help matters, unless you mix something like a good quality lavender essential oil into the mix.

eva888
April 30th, 2014, 10:31 AM
How long has it been since you went to a dermatologist?
Mine makes me wait at least 4 months after a new prescription for my skin because the majority of skin meds take at least 3 months to show any improvement, and up to 6 to show a real good improvement if something is working. I last went in at the end of November. I'm now only just due back and will be getting my meds changed again because this stuff hasn't worked. I know with my acne, symptoms can often get worse before getting any better on meds, so you need to wait it out.
If you go back after a few months (at least 3) of using and your skin is still itching, do not leave the doctors place until he has examined you. He should examine you and perhaps takes a sample of the skin or sores to check for fungal infections. Don't settle for less just because they're "busy".

What I will suggest is to get an allergy test. I'm allergic to SLS, which gave me the exact symptoms you describe. It built up into itchy sores eventually which went away when I stopped using sulphates, but come back within two days if I use it by accident now. Though you've tried SLS-free, it could be something else entirely you're allergic to that produces those symptoms. It's worth checking out.

Lastly, do you live in a wet area, and how do you dry your hair after washing? Some people get itchiness from fungal infections if they bun their hair wet because the extended contact with water on the scalp can attract fungus. I've never had an issue since the discovery of my SLS allergy, but some people can have issues with wet-bunning and over-oiling over fungus wouldn't really help matters, unless you mix something like a good quality lavender essential oil into the mix.

I am also allergic to SLS and when I stopped using it 99.9% of my eczema went away. This is definitely something you should look into. Try to see an allergist if you can.

Soullurre
May 4th, 2014, 03:10 AM
FINALLY! My scalp has stopped itching and no dryness. It has been 2 days now. I stopped using what the dermatologist prescribed. My mother had bought me Head and Shoulder 2 in 1 Eucalyptus Shampoo and I washed my scalp with that. The smell was strong and went in my throat but it helped a lot (probably cus I wash my head in the sink). Then I applied vaseline to my scalp and boom! So, I just stick with this? Is it bad to leave vaseline on the scalp for days?

torrilin
May 4th, 2014, 07:04 AM
Just watch out with baby shampoo, you'd think it was one of the gentlest out there but actually it is very harsh. It is ipextremely alkaline and the scalp is naturally slightly acidic so it will be stripped by baby shampoo. I would advise a sulphate free shampoo - Aubrey or weleda are fab brands.

Depends very much on the baby shampoo. California Baby and Aveeno (among others) make fragrance free baby shampoo and body wash that are SLS free and can work very well for adults. That said, if the Cetaphil is working, I don't see a whole lot of point in switching. It's already fragrance free, and while it contains sodium laureth sulfate, it's quite dilute. If it's helping the itching, chances are Soullurre doesn't react to SLS.

The p.H issue (when there is one) is because the human eye is somewhat alkaline compared to the human scalp. So a "tear free" product that doesn't hurt in a baby's eyes may be alkaline enough to cause problems. It won't always and automatically be that way tho... acids and bases aren't a cut and dried thing where each chemical always and only reacts one way. I mean, duh, it can't be cut and dried if our p.H varies over different bits of our bodies, right? So the chemists who design shampoos can use similar science to what our bodies do.

Soullurre, I'm concerned that your doctor is acting a bit racist, whether he's intending to be or not. Steroids can be helpful for itching and inflammation, but they're not always a great idea to use on skin. They can cause skin thinning (among other things), and they need careful watching that it sounds like he's really unwilling to do. It's not at all unusual for one person to do react badly to several different steroid creams, and only be able to use one particular one. And I know it can be godawful hard for me to get doctors to listen to me as a white woman, and I know damn well that black women get worse treatment. Is there any chance you can see another doctor or get a referral to a dermatologist? (hell, it's hard for my male partner to get decent treatment for his psoriasis sometimes... it's a lot *easier* for the doctor to pretend that the patient doesn't know their own body than to deal with a difficult chronic problem... and even a well meaning doctor can try things that wind up working very badly for the patient.)

Steroids aren't automatically bad. I *love* my steroid asthma inhaler for helping me avoid asthma attacks. But like any drug, steroids need watching and they're not a magic cure. If your doctor is unwilling to monitor the drugs or listen to the problems you're having with them, he is not doing a good job. And since you mention you're postpartum that makes me worry that he's ignoring the warnings on the drugs he is prescribing. "Fluocinonide should be used with caution when treating children, pregnant women, nursing mothers, and anyone using the medication for longer than two weeks." is a warning I have seen in a couple places, including the drug's wikipedia page. And while wikipedia is not an always authoritative source, their drug pages tend to be copiously supplied with chemical diagrams and references.

Imalath
May 4th, 2014, 06:31 PM
Glad to hear you finally got some relief! I have had a lifetime battle with an itchy scalp and things always seem to work for a bit and then they just stop or are discontinued or the formula changes. I was going to suggest that maybe a filtered showerhead or sink-faucet if you wash you hair in the sink might help. They put an awful lot of chlorine in our water here on occasion, and it always does funky things to my skin...

Soullurre
May 6th, 2014, 06:35 AM
Can't afford to get a filter yet. I have to pay for other stuff. I'm pretty sure I can't keep using the Head and Shoulders cus it's strong. But I saw that Johnson's made an improved formula. And was wondering why did they put glycerin in the new formula. Why are people so scared of the old Johnson's. My mother told me that's all she used on my hair growing up. Johnson's Shampoo. I went out and got the new formula but hesitant. Doesn't glycerin suck the moisture from your body? I'm not the type of person to stay very hydrated and the humidity here is usually in the 50's and I never go outside unless it's to doctor appointments.

Soullurre
May 18th, 2014, 02:16 AM
Bump.

I had bought Equate's brand of Baby Shampoo instead of Johnson's. It's an improved formula. It says no parabens, phalphates, quart etc.

I don't wanna keep using Head and Shoulders. So should I stick to this baby shampoo?

Imalath
May 18th, 2014, 06:16 PM
Maybe you can cycle between the two shampoos...use your baby shampoo until your scalp starts to feel itchy, and then wash just once or twice with head and shoulders to clear it up before going back to the baby shampoo? I don't have much experience in individual product ingredients so I don't have any idea about the glycerin, sorry :(

YvetteVarie
May 19th, 2014, 08:58 AM
I am also going to follow this thread. I have the same problem, only mine is caused by the cold, dry weather over here. Any solutions for the winter itchies?

Sorry OP for hijacking your thread

meteor
May 19th, 2014, 09:49 AM
I am also going to follow this thread. I have the same problem, only mine is caused by the cold, dry weather over here. Any solutions for the winter itchies?

Sorry OP for hijacking your thread

When I know it's just simple dryness and no fungal issues, I use oils on scalp, just like I use oils on skin. Coconut oil and castor oil are a safe bet, but most carrier oils will work. Just go with something you have on hand, feels good on scalp and doesn't smell offensive to you. Mineral oil is good too (despite the bad publicity), because it's extremely moisturizing and it does not feed any nasties like Malassezia fungus.

Also, I'm a huge fan of natural humectants like aloe vera and honey for moisturizing - dilute them with water and apply to scalp before or during a wash.

YvetteVarie
May 21st, 2014, 02:03 AM
When I know it's just simple dryness and no fungal issues, I use oils on scalp, just like I use oils on skin. Coconut oil and castor oil are a safe bet, but most carrier oils will work. Just go with something you have on hand, feels good on scalp and doesn't smell offensive to you. Mineral oil is good too (despite the bad publicity), because it's extremely moisturizing and it does not feed any nasties like Malassezia fungus.

Also, I'm a huge fan of natural humectants like aloe vera and honey for moisturizing - dilute them with water and apply to scalp before or during a wash.

Thank you, I will try out the aloe vera this weekend. I already use oils, and I thought that the oil is what's causing it. Let me just use aloe vera and see what happens

Soullurre
June 3rd, 2014, 11:56 AM
Okay so I have the itching under control but what's going on with this?

http://oi59.tinypic.com/v9i8p.jpg

I have been itching on the sides of my head and the back at the nape but I have no clue why I'm having spotty hair loss. I wanna wear my own hair in public but look. It's like that on the other side as well. Been having problems uploading. I was thinking of trying some Indian Remedy by drowning my head in oil and brushing intensely everyday to see if that would help.

Wosie
June 3rd, 2014, 12:39 PM
My sides (...and front--fringe area) also go through thinning periods due to continuous scratching (atopic eczema). Luckily I've gotten it somewhat under control, so the hair has mostly grown back. I hope it'll be the same for you.

Anje
June 3rd, 2014, 01:28 PM
Hmm, did you have your hair in tight, small braids a lot in the past? My first thought is that perhaps you've got some leftover traction alopecia from that, especially since it looks like there's almost a diamond pattern going on.

Stimulating oils on your scalp will probably be good, but if I were you I'd massage gently with fingertips instead of brushing intensely. You've got a really tight curl pattern that's likely to have weak points where teeny curls will be prone to breaking off (http://www.thenaturalhavenbloom.com/2011/06/tiny-wisps-of-hair-is-kinky-hair-weak.html). Less mechanical stress will mean you can retain more of the length you grow -- keep your combing and brushing slow and careful!

lapushka
June 3rd, 2014, 02:19 PM
Traction alopecia was my first guess as well. Did you pull your hair back tightly in the past? A lot? If it is not that, and it has something to do with the itching, I strongly suggest you going back to the doctor, and heeding the advice he gives this time around.

Beborani
June 3rd, 2014, 02:32 PM
It looks like your doctor prescribed anitfungal medication and shampoo(from your first post)--you really should have stayed with it.

Soullurre
June 4th, 2014, 05:46 PM
Nope. Never let my hair got long enough to get braided. I shaved my head 12 times in 3 years. So it isn't that. I tried to stick with the stuff the dr gave me but I would just have even more itching and burning and it messed with my breathing. It could be from post partum or this implant in my arm. I have Nexplanon. I'm gonna go back to the people that put it in to get them to take it out cus I've also been nauseated every day and having a bunch of headaches.

Soullurre
June 21st, 2014, 12:21 AM
Just learned that I actually have an oily scalp. And my hair was patchy like that cus of oil build up. So, I stay away from oils, and shampoos with oils and conditioners. I have just been using Equate's baby shampoo because it's basic and it keeps my hair clean and my hair in those patchy areas are growing in. :disco: