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Syren_Curls
April 12th, 2014, 02:40 PM
Hi Longhairs!

Thanks to some threads here and all of the helpful feedback, I'm back to caring for my hair with lots of TLC :-) AT TBL headed to classic, one of the things I've committed to as part of even better care for my hair is making sure it's up a great majority of the time. I am still learning some of the go-to's for people, such as a few of the buns and hair forks are a purchase I haven't made just yet, but while I get more advanced with my hair sticks and keep my hair up, I thought I would see about getting creative with some styles I *can* do. I just want to make sure it's all protective :-)

Hence my question: What are the components of a protective hairstyle? I know some, I just want to make sure there isn't anything I miss. For instance, no heat or on the cool setting if possible, and no teasing. I also know no hair elastics unless they are cloth covered and don't have metal pieces. Gentle handling as well, no snapping and ripping through hair. I also know not to style in the same spot every day, but it would be great if someone can flesh that out a little bit more, please.

What else makes up a protective style?

Thanks :-)

darklyndsea
April 12th, 2014, 02:51 PM
Keeps your hair from rubbing on anything or blowing around in the wind.

No damaging products like hairspray.

panffle
April 12th, 2014, 02:56 PM
Keeps ends protected (away from rubbing, like darklyndsea said), and comfortable to wear :) If it's too tight it can cause traction alopecia and breakage, so it's no good. For me, the least items I have to use to keep my hair up the better - some people like using hair sticks but I don't find these comfortable, I use a flexi-8 and it's perfect for this purpose.

Anje
April 12th, 2014, 03:07 PM
Preventing tangles / storing hair so that it stays untangled is a major point for me.

Syren_Curls
April 12th, 2014, 03:25 PM
Those are really good protection guidelines to keep in mind! Thanks :-)

darklyndsea and panffle... when you mention keeping hair/ends from rubbing against anything, would that also include a sock bun? I haven't been able to figure out if that is protective or not for this reason. On the one hand, everything is tucked away and not too tightly. On the other hand, I worry about the chafing and rubbing.

Sharysa
April 12th, 2014, 03:35 PM
For my hair, braids are perfectly fine as protective styles on their own. My main issue isn't breakage, but tangling and having it get everywhere. Braids cut way down on tangles already, so I'm going to start experimenting with crown-braid type styles for bun-level protection without the headaches from actual buns.

darklyndsea
April 12th, 2014, 03:39 PM
Those are really good protection guidelines to keep in mind! Thanks :-)

darklyndsea and panffle... when you mention keeping hair/ends from rubbing against anything, would that also include a sock bun? I haven't been able to figure out if that is protective or not for this reason. On the one hand, everything is tucked away and not too tightly. On the other hand, I worry about the chafing and rubbing.

If it's not moving around and not rubbing on anything, it should be fine once it's up. I don't know the specifics of sock buns, so I don't know if putting it up and taking it down will cause enough damage to worry about if it's a regular hairstyle of yours.

Madora
April 12th, 2014, 04:39 PM
A style that distributes the weight of the hair in sections. Sectioned hair, particularly in buns, is much more comfortable to wear.

Syren_Curls
April 12th, 2014, 04:43 PM
Hmmmmmmm, darklyndsea... You got me thinking. I like the sock bun because I feel like other buns on me look too small, not because I use the sock. To do that, the ends are wrapped around the middle of the sock and rolled up the length. Not as neat and pretty as it sounds so I would rather *NOT* risk the mechanical damage if I can instead eliminate it. With that said, I realized I can still do a sock bun without the sock by just rolling my hair under and pinning it. It was the look I liked, not the technique. So, thank you! Here's a video tutorial:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mcNBA-o1mtc

Sharysa, I've mostly stuck to braids too :-) I really like the crown braids for the aesthetic and also find them a comfortable protective style. I'll look forward to your pics if you post any :-)

What other things should I keep in mind for protective styles? These are definitely thought-provoking and help me streamline good styles that will be kind to my hair.

Syren_Curls
April 12th, 2014, 04:44 PM
Thanks, Madora! I think I was posting while you were ;-)

Would you mind giving me an example of sectioned hair? I can only think of crown braids or twists... :-/

Madora
April 12th, 2014, 05:33 PM
A sectioned hairstyle can vary according to the imagination of its creator. Here's one I used a lot (in years past):

1) Gently detangle all hair
2) Make a horizontal part from the top of your right ear, across the back of your head, to the top of your left ear
3) Take all the hair above the part, comb out, then loosely braid to the end. Secure w/elastic
4) Take the braid and holding it flat against your scalp, coil it in a clockwise position, pinning while you go.
5) Take remaining hair, detangle, loosely braid it, secure w/elastic
6) Take the braid and wind it around the bun already made in an anti-clockwise position, pinning as you go.*

Voila...one double braided sectioned bun. Can also be done with twists, or rope braids, Cameo bun, etc.

* = It helps if you bend your head down while braiding because that way you get closer to the bunned braid than you would if you braided while standing erect.

Sectioned buns hold like a rock and are comfortable all day.

If you have long enough hair, you can really section it out via the triple braided bun.

A Vortex bun is also a great way to section long hair.

Syren_Curls
April 13th, 2014, 07:59 PM
Wow, I really like that Madora. Thanks for typing that out-I'm looking forward to trying that out on Monday or Tuesday and will do my best to post a pretty picture :-)

Your response also gives me some great ideas about creatively sectioning my hairdo's for even more protective and comfortable styles :-)

cole
April 19th, 2014, 03:03 PM
I'm at shoulder-length with my hair, any suggestions for protective styles for me? Or would it not be much of a concern with such short length?

Madora
April 19th, 2014, 04:06 PM
Cole, I don't think you need to worry at that length. However, you might want to investigate silk or satin pillowslip covers to help protect the ends at night, plus combing your hair daily to remove any possible tangles.

cole
April 20th, 2014, 01:06 AM
Cole, I don't think you need to worry at that length. However, you might want to investigate silk or satin pillowslip covers to help protect the ends at night, plus combing your hair daily to remove any possible tangles.

Thank you! I have thought about this in the past, and moreso recently. Soon as I can afford one I definitely will. (or, soon as I am confident enough to sew my own silk pillowcase, I will. ha!)

georgia_peach
April 20th, 2014, 08:20 AM
Madora, your detailed instructions are most helpful. I'd love to find an article or book devoted entirely to protective hairstyles with those kinds of step by step details. Maybe you should author something!

Madora
April 20th, 2014, 08:37 AM
@Cole, you might want to check out thrift stores and see if you could find a silk or satin blouse that you could cut down. If you have a fabric retail outlet in your town, they might have satin/silk remnants that might be cheaper. Worse comes to worse, you could always safety pin the fabric around your pillow.

@Georgia_peach, thanks for your kind words.

Syren_Curls
April 21st, 2014, 10:54 PM
Madora, your detailed instructions are most helpful. I'd love to find an article or book devoted entirely to protective hairstyles with those kinds of step by step details. Maybe you should author something!

I agree with that! I've also found some of your other posts quite as nicely written and very *clear* throughout the forum.

My week turned into a bit more of a chaotic one than I was anticipating and I fell off my wear hair up in protective styles wagon... sigh. So, no pic yet of this style but this week should allow for it :-) I'm still looking forward to it :-)

Ellethwyn
April 24th, 2014, 02:47 PM
Would wearing a regular braid that's down and not put up be protective?

meteor
April 24th, 2014, 03:07 PM
I'm at shoulder-length with my hair, any suggestions for protective styles for me?
Have to tried a French twist? It's a gorgeous style that often doesn't work on hair longer than BSL, but may already work at shoulder.
Also, French/Dutch braids and a crown braid can be created on shorter hair.

meteor
April 24th, 2014, 03:10 PM
Would wearing a regular braid that's down and not put up be protective?

Not if it gets caught on clothing, chairs, doors... But if you are always mindful of it, keep it over your shoulder, etc it's a great protective style. Just make sure you use hair-friendly ties (silk paranda, for example) and oil your braid tassel if it's dry.

Ellethwyn
April 24th, 2014, 03:14 PM
Not if it gets caught on clothing, chairs, doors... But if you are always mindful of it, keep it over your shoulder, etc it's a great protective style. Just make sure you use hair-friendly ties (silk paranda, for example) and oil your braid tassel if it's dry.

Thanks! I am new to this. I didn't know about silk paranda. I notice my hair is getting snagged on so many things lately and it breaks my heart when a hair gets pulled out or broke off. I prefer to wear a side braid so I'm glad it can be a great protective style.

MadAddie
April 24th, 2014, 03:39 PM
Woah.... im really gonna have to start being more careful. I think I am too rough on my hair, Cant seem to stop myself brushing it wet out of the shower. I also stopped braiding it because it looked weird after i took it out of the braid (straight long bangs and wavy frizzy length), but im going to definitely start braiding again and sectioning from now on. Thanku guys and thanku Madora ♥xx

Panth
April 25th, 2014, 06:33 PM
For me, things that make hairstyles protective are:
- up off the nape of the neck (to prevent rubbing on the collar, between your back and your chair, against bag straps or car seatbelts, when you sit on it, etc.)
- no damaging styling (i.e. no heat, no backcombing, no snaggy hairtoys, nothing that will cause knots or tangles)
- contained, to prevent tangles developing and to prevent damage from hairs rubbing on each other
- tight enough that the style will not move too much (movement = rubbing) but not so tight that it risks traction alopecia

So, for me this basically means solid but not overly tight buns that do not touch the collar. In practice, this is 99% of the time a braided cinnabun with spinpins, positioned at my nape. Most any LHC sort of bun done with spin pins, Amish pins, sticks or hairforks would come under my definition of 'protective', as would crown braids, coronet braids, maiden braids, Freida Kahlo braids, hair taping, etc.

I don't bother with sectioning (my hair is not thick enough to require it) or rotating hairstyles (I am hairstyle inept, plus I don't see that this makes that much difference unless you are doing styles that induce traction alopecia ... in which case you should just avoid those styles).

~~~


Would wearing a regular braid that's down and not put up be protective?

Braids worn down are more protective than loose hair as they contain the hair and prevent tangles. However, in my books they are not protective as they do not prevent the hair from rubbing on everything and anything, plus they use hairties which can be damaging (even the 'no damage' ones, particularly when used in the same spot repeatedly and/or on damaged/old hair). In particular, the tassel (the oldest and most vulnerable part of your hair) is free and in no way protected.

Some people can grow hair to very long lengths while wearing it loose nearly all the time. Some people can do so with just loose hair, half ups and braids. Most people who want very long hair (TBL and longer) require daily/near-daily protective updos that follow the descriptions above. Of course, if you are going for shorter lengths, have very resilient hair and/or are happy with putting up with damage then you can get away without protective updos.

ARG
April 25th, 2014, 07:35 PM
Would wearing a regular braid that's down and not put up be protective?

It sure is; it keeps your hair from tangling. I do a simple English braid or a dutch braid at night for a protective sleep braid, and secure it with a soft cloth scrunchie.

Syren_Curls
April 26th, 2014, 12:06 PM
For me, things that make hairstyles protective are:
- up off the nape of the neck (to prevent rubbing on the collar, between your back and your chair, against bag straps or car seatbelts, when you sit on it, etc.)
- no damaging styling (i.e. no heat, no backcombing, no snaggy hairtoys, nothing that will cause knots or tangles)
- contained, to prevent tangles developing and to prevent damage from hairs rubbing on each other
- tight enough that the style will not move too much (movement = rubbing) but not so tight that it risks traction alopecia

So, for me this basically means solid but not overly tight buns that do not touch the collar. In practice, this is 99% of the time a braided cinnabun with spinpins, positioned at my nape. Most any LHC sort of bun done with spin pins, Amish pins, sticks or hairforks would come under my definition of 'protective', as would crown braids, coronet braids, maiden braids, Freida Kahlo braids, hair taping, etc.

I don't bother with sectioning (my hair is not thick enough to require it) or rotating hairstyles (I am hairstyle inept, plus I don't see that this makes that much difference unless you are doing styles that induce traction alopecia ... in which case you should just avoid those styles).



Thanks, Panth! Very informative as well and answered some questions I have had! Would you mind elaborating a bit more on what styles tend to induce traction alopecia, please? I'm a bit anxious about that since most of my bun go-to's until now have been tightly done on top of my head. I'm still newer to learning about the LHC buns and I only know the crown braids among the remainder of the list you mentioned. This way, I can revise my arsenal of protective hair styles in a more informed manner.

picklepie
April 26th, 2014, 03:17 PM
All great ideas! But it's worth saying that the standard advice for protective updos doesn't always take into account the needs of curly hair-- which for me, includes LOW MANIPULATION and avoiding unnecessary detangling of dry hair. I don't tend to braid a lot these days, or section my hair for buns, as I get a lot of breakage if I detangle outside the shower. It might be something to keep in mind if you find that detangling-in-order-to-style leads to damage for your curly hair as it gets longer. :)

Panth
April 27th, 2014, 12:04 PM
Thanks, Panth! Very informative as well and answered some questions I have had! Would you mind elaborating a bit more on what styles tend to induce traction alopecia, please? I'm a bit anxious about that since most of my bun go-to's until now have been tightly done on top of my head. I'm still newer to learning about the LHC buns and I only know the crown braids among the remainder of the list you mentioned. This way, I can revise my arsenal of protective hair styles in a more informed manner.

Generally, traction alopecia is caused by styles that are literally so tight they pull hairs out or very almost pull them out. E.g. very, very tight ponytails or (I think the most common hairstyle cause) overly tight cornrows in curly/kinky hair.

As for the hairstyles I listed:
- crown braid, as you know = dutch braid around the perimeter of the head
- coronet braid is also called a faux crown braid and can only really be done at classic+. You simply do a low English braid and pin it around the perimeter of your head to look like a crown braid.
- maiden braids (http://www.abeautifulmess.com/2011/03/how-to-style-maiden-braids-.html) are similar, but start with two English braids
- Freda Kahlo braids (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dxltmgagKeg) are similar to maiden braids, but involve a scarf

The key point is that all of those styles involve pinning the braids up off the collar, which gets the tassel out of the way of damage and stops everything from being rubbed on clothing, chair backs, etc.

(I also totally agree with Picklepie about manipulation, even as a 1b. It doesn't matter how protective a style is -- if it required lots and lots of manipulation (and thus lots of breakage and wear) to get the hair into the style, then it's not protective).

Syren_Curls
April 27th, 2014, 05:16 PM
Generally, traction alopecia is caused by styles that are literally so tight they pull hairs out or very almost pull them out. E.g. very, very tight ponytails or (I think the most common hairstyle cause) overly tight cornrows in curly/kinky hair.

As for the hairstyles I listed:
- crown braid, as you know = dutch braid around the perimeter of the head
- coronet braid is also called a faux crown braid and can only really be done at classic+. You simply do a low English braid and pin it around the perimeter of your head to look like a crown braid.
- maiden braids (http://www.abeautifulmess.com/2011/03/how-to-style-maiden-braids-.html) are similar, but start with two English braids
- Freda Kahlo braids (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dxltmgagKeg) are similar to maiden braids, but involve a scarf

The key point is that all of those styles involve pinning the braids up off the collar, which gets the tassel out of the way of damage and stops everything from being rubbed on clothing, chair backs, etc.

(I also totally agree with Picklepie about manipulation, even as a 1b. It doesn't matter how protective a style is -- if it required lots and lots of manipulation (and thus lots of breakage and wear) to get the hair into the style, then it's not protective).

I really appreciate that breakdown and explanation. Thank you so much for taking the time to elaborate and provide all of that info. I knew "too tight" could be risky but this helps explain specifically what "too tight" styles means and, more importantly, how to make sure that is avoided. Also, the links and descriptions gives me a good sense of, like you said, ways of keeping my hair nicely tucked away and protected in general while also away from rubbing against things by making sure it's off my collar, chair, person, etc. As a nice bonus, those braids are quite pretty and I am looking forward to adding them to my repertoire!

Picklepie, you make a good point about little manipulation. Other than the brushing to detangle, I am being very mindful of handling already detangled in the shower hair for a braid to optimize protectiveness of the styling ;-)

I was initially feeling a bit silly asking this question, but I am so glad I did. I have learned so much more to consider and am happy that others have as well. Thank you guys for all of the feedback!

Panth
April 28th, 2014, 03:29 PM
I really appreciate that breakdown and explanation. Thank you so much for taking the time to elaborate and provide all of that info. I knew "too tight" could be risky but this helps explain specifically what "too tight" styles means and, more importantly, how to make sure that is avoided. Also, the links and descriptions gives me a good sense of, like you said, ways of keeping my hair nicely tucked away and protected in general while also away from rubbing against things by making sure it's off my collar, chair, person, etc. As a nice bonus, those braids are quite pretty and I am looking forward to adding them to my repertoire!

Picklepie, you make a good point about little manipulation. Other than the brushing to detangle, I am being very mindful of handling already detangled in the shower hair for a braid to optimize protectiveness of the styling ;-)

I was initially feeling a bit silly asking this question, but I am so glad I did. I have learned so much more to consider and am happy that others have as well. Thank you guys for all of the feedback!

No worries. I'm afraid I'm a terrible waffler, so I'm glad that all the waffling went to someone who found it useful. ^_^

I'm fairly keen on protective styling, since my hair is very delicate. I swapped from wearing loose (usually) or a low ponytail or low English braid every day when my hair stalled at TBL for several years. I went to daily protective updos (nearly always a low braided cinnabun with spin pins) and have not only ended my false terminal but reached knee and am still going (or, rather, am maintaining at the moment -- but I am not at terminal by any stretch). I am a big advocate of protective updos!

Don't be concerned about asking questions! It's the best way to learn. Good luck with your hair journey.

meteor
April 28th, 2014, 03:45 PM
I went to daily protective updos (nearly always a low braided cinnabun with spin pins) and have not only ended my false terminal but reached knee and am still going (or, rather, am maintaining at the moment -- but I am not at terminal by any stretch). I am a big advocate of protective updos!
That's my go-to style, too. :) I think it's the most protective style ever invented, but do you think it's a safe style to wear every day? I really hope so. :)

Syren_Curls
April 28th, 2014, 04:47 PM
No worries. I'm afraid I'm a terrible waffler, so I'm glad that all the waffling went to someone who found it useful. ^_^

I'm fairly keen on protective styling, since my hair is very delicate. I swapped from wearing loose (usually) or a low ponytail or low English braid every day when my hair stalled at TBL for several years. I went to daily protective updos (nearly always a low braided cinnabun with spin pins) and have not only ended my false terminal but reached knee and am still going (or, rather, am maintaining at the moment -- but I am not at terminal by any stretch). I am a big advocate of protective updos!

Don't be concerned about asking questions! It's the best way to learn. Good luck with your hair journey.

:-) I think you were very specific and clear! It was very informative for me and I didn't find it at all waffley... but I too am a terrible waffler and it may have just been my language, so to speak.

It sounds like you've had a wonderful hair journey and done a lot of trouble shooting yourself... Knee length and still going is incredible! That is a testament to your care and knowledge! I'm at TBL now and, for the first time, wanting to go a bit longer. The power of the protective updo has finally really hit me and your info has already been valuable in keeping me very mindful of how safely protected I am keeping my hair. I am having other issues with it at the moment so this carries even more weight today. Also, I really appreciate your openness and welcoming questions :-)

I finally managed to pull off the double braided bun Madora was nice enough to describe... please don't mind the weird lighting-I was in my office-and the greasy look-I am having co-washing issues :-(

http://i242.photobucket.com/albums/ff100/sallyn_album/Mobile%20Uploads/20140428_124351.jpg

HintOfMint
April 28th, 2014, 10:59 PM
The biggest cause of damage for me is tangling, so any style that prevents tangling I consider to be a protective style. Of course, this could mean styles that still expose hair to friction, and thus, other people wouldn't consider them protective styles for their own hair, if that makes sense?

For instance, my hair never tangles in braids and ponytails, so I would consider them, along with buns, to be protective styles. Others, whose biggest source of damage would be friction (without the tangling), would not consider these styles protective.

Syren_Curls
April 28th, 2014, 11:21 PM
That makes sense, HintOfMint. Tangles can definitely be damaging! You're also pointing out that there are individual factors to always consider when picking a protective style... that also includes lifestyle, hair itself, skills, etc.... And that's a really good point also. Thank you.

Rosa Harris
April 29th, 2014, 01:42 AM
All great ideas! But it's worth saying that the standard advice for protective updos doesn't always take into account the needs of curly hair-- which for me, includes LOW MANIPULATION and avoiding unnecessary detangling of dry hair. I don't tend to braid a lot these days, or section my hair for buns, as I get a lot of breakage if I detangle outside the shower. It might be something to keep in mind if you find that detangling-in-order-to-style leads to damage for your curly hair as it gets longer. :)

curly curly my mom does - mine not quite curly enough to require this - she smooths her hair upward with her hands all around her head like making a pineapple then uses a kneehigh and wraps it around and half knots and pulls it together till she makes a pineapple on top but not tight enough to cause breakage. You can adjust the tension using the kneehigh that way then half bowtie it for easy removal. Finger separate into 4 clumps - front sides and back then roll back clump under toward the outside and pin into place. If hair is shorter and want a bigger bun just roll up small sections of thicker weave dread and roll the sections over that to make a sweet bun.

Rosa Harris
April 29th, 2014, 03:18 AM
"I finally managed to pull off the double braided bun Madora was nice enough to describe... please don't mind the weird lighting-I was in my office-and the greasy look-I am having co-washing issues :-( "

http://i242.photobucket.com/albums/ff100/sallyn_album/Mobile%20Uploads/20140428_124351.jpg

anyone have tutorial for this with pics I am terrible at figuring things from texts but this one look sreally neat to me.

KittyBird
April 29th, 2014, 04:36 AM
anyone have tutorial for this with pics I am terrible at figuring things from texts but this one look sreally neat to me.

I made a (cr*ppy) video a while ago (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJ3cgg5s7pU), and though it's not a braided sectioned bun, it's the same concept. If you want to do a braided version, simply braid the sectioned top part and pin it up or secure with a toy of your choice (in my case, a size L flexi-8 ). I prefer to divide the lower section in two, but that's just me. It's perfectly fine to make only one braid and pin it around :)

CremeTron
April 29th, 2014, 06:34 AM
I am torn at the moment. I am no longer wearing protective styles as I want to look pretty! I am not allowed to wear nail varnish at work, my hair is quite fuzzy around my face and I have a chubby face and a stocky body. Have gained weight in past year.

But I have noticed tangles. I wonder what are some pretty protective styles that don't require one to flatten their curls? I like my ringlets!

Rosa Harris
April 29th, 2014, 11:41 AM
I am torn at the moment. I am no longer wearing protective styles as I want to look pretty! I am not allowed to wear nail varnish at work, my hair is quite fuzzy around my face and I have a chubby face and a stocky body. Have gained weight in past year.

But I have noticed tangles. I wonder what are some pretty protective styles that don't require one to flatten their curls? I like my ringlets!

actually you could leave ringlets falling out of the up-do I posted above - anything up on the very top of the head makes the face look thinner because it elongates the lines and visually tames roundness. I've always had a moon-face think of chubby so I have always liked high up center hair. Fuzzies can be tamed with some shea butter and working them back against the head in an upward motion.

Beborani
April 29th, 2014, 12:27 PM
If I want to do an updo with curls intact I just gather it wherever it is convenient and roll it up like french roll but not neatly and fix it with a fork or spin pins. The curls spill out but since each curl is intact it doesnt look untidy. I dont like neat smooth buns most of the time so this works for me.

Panth
April 29th, 2014, 12:35 PM
That's my go-to style, too. :) I think it's the most protective style ever invented, but do you think it's a safe style to wear every day? I really hope so. :)

So far, I've not had problems with my braided cinnabun and I've worn it near-daily for nearly 4 years. I do have nape breakage, but I think that's from my cycle helmet not the bun.


:-) I think you were very specific and clear! It was very informative for me and I didn't find it at all waffley... but I too am a terrible waffler and it may have just been my language, so to speak.

It sounds like you've had a wonderful hair journey and done a lot of trouble shooting yourself... Knee length and still going is incredible! That is a testament to your care and knowledge! I'm at TBL now and, for the first time, wanting to go a bit longer. The power of the protective updo has finally really hit me and your info has already been valuable in keeping me very mindful of how safely protected I am keeping my hair. I am having other issues with it at the moment so this carries even more weight today. Also, I really appreciate your openness and welcoming questions :-)

I finally managed to pull off the double braided bun Madora was nice enough to describe... please don't mind the weird lighting-I was in my office-and the greasy look-I am having co-washing issues :-(

That is a lovely bun!

Yes, IMO, post-TBL is when protective updos really become essential (or, at least for my hair type). The amount of additional wear from sitting on your ends/braid tassel (and other people sitting on it, and it going down the back of the sofa, etc., etc., etc.) is considerable.

chen bao jun
April 29th, 2014, 03:26 PM
I need my ends protected and moisturized and preventative measures for tangling, especially in my sleep. What works for me is a cinnabun during the day and two braids at night wrapped in a silk scarf after I moisturize my hair with a rose water spray and put some oil on top to seal moisture in.
I am a tightly curly and I braid and bun my hair with only a little finger combing--I don't try to totally detangle except in the shower full of conditioner.
However, I am a tightly curly with coarse, strong hair. Some tightly curlies need a lot more protection than this because a lot of them have fine hair. Fine + curly is a delicate comibination that can mean hardly ever touching your hair is best, leaving it in braids or twists for long periods of time and even washing like that. As someone said above, the braids should not be too tight, those tight cornrows give you traction alopecia.
Ballerinas and Amish women also suffer a lot from traction alopecia though so a tight bun in the same place every day CAN give you that over time. Though I do a cinnabun basically every day, I do vary the place I put them and I never use a hair tie first and I also do not brush my edges and do not try to slick them down with products (Products that would 'control' your edges seem to me to be by definition drying). I have seen too many balding black women (sometimes not just the edges, sometimes way far back) to want to take any risks there.

CremeTron
April 29th, 2014, 06:42 PM
Thank you Rosa Harris and Beborani. I will try that tomorrow for work!

Syren_Curls
April 30th, 2014, 12:35 AM
I'm really happy to see that there are other people getting ideas and information from this thread!


So far, I've not had problems with my braided cinnabun and I've worn it near-daily for nearly 4 years. I do have nape breakage, but I think that's from my cycle helmet not the bun.

That is a lovely bun!

Yes, IMO, post-TBL is when protective updos really become essential (or, at least for my hair type). The amount of additional wear from sitting on your ends/braid tassel (and other people sitting on it, and it going down the back of the sofa, etc., etc., etc.) is considerable.

Thank you for the nice compliment :-) I had a hard time so I think my arms will need to get some strengthening... and that just means more practice with fun, protective styles ;-)

In another thread I started asking about swim caps, someone mentioned a lycra cap (http://smile.amazon.com/Extra-Large-Black-Lycra-Swim/dp/B00AKGCXUY/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1398836006&sr=8-5&keywords=lycra+swim+cap+long+hair) to fit over hair and under the swim cap. I wonder if that might help protect your nape from the cycle helmut, Panth.

CremeTron, if you do, please let us know how it goes... pics, perhaps?? :-)

Panth
April 30th, 2014, 01:10 PM
I'm really happy to see that there are other people getting ideas and information from this thread!

Thank you for the nice compliment :-) I had a hard time so I think my arms will need to get some strengthening... and that just means more practice with fun, protective styles ;-)

In another thread I started asking about swim caps, someone mentioned a lycra cap (http://smile.amazon.com/Extra-Large-Black-Lycra-Swim/dp/B00AKGCXUY/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1398836006&sr=8-5&keywords=lycra+swim+cap+long+hair) to fit over hair and under the swim cap. I wonder if that might help protect your nape from the cycle helmut, Panth.

CremeTron, if you do, please let us know how it goes... pics, perhaps?? :-)

Thanks for the suggestion.

I already wear a buff, which I think helps a bit. Certainly, the winter when I wore my scarf hijab-style under my helmet resulted in much worse breakage than the winters when I wore the buff and THEN the scarf (although that winter was colder, so perhaps the lack of buff wasn't the only reason for the breakage). The buff definitely helps with to protect the hair the helmet directly sits on, but it doesn't do much for the nape or the first 6" or so of braid (and that bit of braid also gets ragged because I perpetually wear scarves...). I'm currently growing out breakage from having to wear a dust mask at work for a month or so last autumn, too. That doesn't help...

I'm beginning to wonder whether my old 3 7/8" ponytail was really because that was pre-cycling or whether it was just amateurish mis-measuring... Certainly, now I'm down to about 3", and I have pretty bad taper too. :(

CremeTron
May 1st, 2014, 06:09 AM
Hi Syren_Buff, I did wear it to work and it looked amazing. I actually felt it looked lovely but without my usual guilt and worry about whether it is breaking off against my clothes. Wonder why I never tried it before! I didn't take a pic.

I don't really take pics and I do not know how to post them if I do but I am not working over weekend and will try to create to an album and link it and I will re-do updo and snap it.

And yes- I am getting very many good ideas from this thread!

As for shea butter on fuzzies. I did not try as my hair is not really that fuzzy but if I scrape it straight back I can look as though I have a 1cm afro if that makes sense? So unless viewed from the side, I think I look unfeminine, so leaving a few tendrils does counteract that.

Whilst doing topknot, I got another idea I wonder if anyone wants to try.. Instead of putting hair in a pony and then pinning hair, one could probably just pin or clip hair in sections on top of head so it looks like it is up all together? I do not have any hair toys other than a couple hairsticks so hair bands are my go to. I think hair sticks are probably a bit dangerous- though I really, really love them so I would not wear one to work.

Syren_Curls
May 1st, 2014, 02:57 PM
Thanks for the suggestion.

I already wear a buff, which I think helps a bit. Certainly, the winter when I wore my scarf hijab-style under my helmet resulted in much worse breakage than the winters when I wore the buff and THEN the scarf (although that winter was colder, so perhaps the lack of buff wasn't the only reason for the breakage). The buff definitely helps with to protect the hair the helmet directly sits on, but it doesn't do much for the nape or the first 6" or so of braid (and that bit of braid also gets ragged because I perpetually wear scarves...). I'm currently growing out breakage from having to wear a dust mask at work for a month or so last autumn, too. That doesn't help...

I'm beginning to wonder whether my old 3 7/8" ponytail was really because that was pre-cycling or whether it was just amateurish mis-measuring... Certainly, now I'm down to about 3", and I have pretty bad taper too. :(

I'm guilty of wearing scarves toooooo... I just thought my nape had new growth, especially since most of my hairline has newer growth now, but reading your experience makes me curious if that is actually breakage :-/

Your 3 7/8" ponytail sounds very impressive... Since I've been paying attention, anyway, I haven't exceeded 2 1/2". I think 3" sounds lovely but I do understand your curiosity and concern in the diminished size of close to an inch. From your comments in this thread, it sounds like your hair is quite beautiful.


Hi Syren_Buff, I did wear it to work and it looked amazing. I actually felt it looked lovely but without my usual guilt and worry about whether it is breaking off against my clothes. Wonder why I never tried it before! I didn't take a pic.

I don't really take pics and I do not know how to post them if I do but I am not working over weekend and will try to create to an album and link it and I will re-do updo and snap it.

And yes- I am getting very many good ideas from this thread!

As for shea butter on fuzzies. I did not try as my hair is not really that fuzzy but if I scrape it straight back I can look as though I have a 1cm afro if that makes sense? So unless viewed from the side, I think I look unfeminine, so leaving a few tendrils does counteract that.

Whilst doing topknot, I got another idea I wonder if anyone wants to try.. Instead of putting hair in a pony and then pinning hair, one could probably just pin or clip hair in sections on top of head so it looks like it is up all together? I do not have any hair toys other than a couple hairsticks so hair bands are my go to. I think hair sticks are probably a bit dangerous- though I really, really love them so I would not wear one to work.

I'm glad to hear that you liked the style and excited that you got another idea. Thanks for following up with that share!

CremeTron
May 1st, 2014, 03:30 PM
You are welcome.

BTW I just wanted to say with regard to my previous post- I don't mean to offend hairstick wearers. I work in close proximity of my colleagues and on a moving vehicle so in that context I would not wear my hairsticks which are actually chop sticks. They protrude quite far out of my hair since my hair is compact and almost APL.

I didn't mean to say they were dangerous per se. That would be very rude considering most on here wear them.

Syren_Curls
May 2nd, 2014, 03:58 AM
Speaking of...

...that brings to mind the question of using protective hair accessories and hair toys. Quality hair sticks, Amish pins, and hairforks have been mentioned... what should we look for in those toys to ensure no damage or minimal damage? And what other hair toys are protective? For example, I always imagined bobby pins were protective but now I am reconsidering that :-/ I know elastics are debated a bit on this forum. Since joining LHC and purchasing my first hair sticks, I have really stopped using them though I wear an emergency FOE pair I made on my wrist just in case.