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Inarticulation
January 27th, 2014, 02:20 PM
As my hair has gotten longer, I have felt the need to put my hair in more up-dos. However, no matter how loose the up-do, I get huge headaches to go with it. I have tried putting my hair in two french plaits to see if it would hurt less - due to weight distribution but I have had no joy. Even in a low ponytail I get a nagging ache in my scalp. I have tried different clips, scrunchies and pins, but no joy. As a child I used to wear my hair in ponytails all the time and my hair used to come to just above my tail bone. I never used to have headaches whatsoever.

Can anyone help me on this one? I apologize if there is already a thread like this, but I am very curious to find out.

lapushka
January 27th, 2014, 02:35 PM
How long is your hair, exactly? Because if it's shorter than BSL and your hair is relatively thick (you are a iii), you *are* probably putting strain on updos. You can't put up your hair successfully as a iii (loose *enough* I mean), not in a cinnabun, not in a lazy wrap bun until you reach BSL or waist length.

Inarticulation
January 27th, 2014, 02:42 PM
How long is your hair, exactly? Because if it's shorter than BSL and your hair is relatively thick (you are a iii), you *are* probably putting strain on updos. You can't put up your hair successfully as a iii (loose *enough* I mean), not in a cinnabun, not in a lazy wrap bun until you reach BSL or waist length.
My hair is between APL and BSL currently, however it is very thick naturally (to the point where if I have my hair washed in a basin, it will fill the basin) so I must be putting strain on it even if it seems just about loose enough to stay up?

lapushka
January 27th, 2014, 02:50 PM
My hair is between APL and BSL currently, however it is very thick naturally (to the point where if I have my hair washed in a basin, it will fill the basin) so I must be putting strain on it even if it seems just about loose enough to stay up?

Yes! I'm a iii as well (4.25" circumference), and couldn't hold a comfortable cinnabun until past waist. A lazy wrap bun was more comfortable a little earlier on, but not by much. A simple peacock twist might be the most comfy at your length. That's how mine was put up from APL on.

Inarticulation
January 27th, 2014, 02:57 PM
Yes! I'm a iii as well (4.25" circumference), and couldn't hold a comfortable cinnabun until past waist. A lazy wrap bun was more comfortable a little earlier on, but not by much. A simple peacock twist might be the most comfy at your length. That's how mine was put up from APL on.
Ah, I had never thought of doing that seeing as in my mind I thought it might be sore all my hair being in one place, I will definitely try this out, thank you :)

lapushka
January 27th, 2014, 02:58 PM
No worries, you're welcome! :flower:

Anje
January 27th, 2014, 07:17 PM
It's worth considering, too, that loose updos aren't always the ones that don't pull. For me, something that has a little tension on most of the hairs ends up not hurting, but a very loose updo will pull on a few supporting sections while the rest will be too loose to help support the hair.

Madora on this forum is always talking about the importance of sectioning hair. While it doesn't seem like it'd make much difference at my thickness, it seems to be a lifesaving strategy for people with thick hair. So consider bunning the top half of your hair, then wrap the bottom half around that bun.

When in doubt, braids are always a great choice.

spidermom
January 27th, 2014, 07:59 PM
1) 2 or more buns.
2) Layers.

I've decided that I never again want to grow my hair to tailbone and beyond without layers. It's too heavy, too bushy, and a major PITA.

ProverbsGirl
January 27th, 2014, 08:09 PM
While the woman who posted above have wonderful advice..and I would recommend following it.
I thought I would share...when my hair reached a certain length the last time i grew it out..I got terrible headaches somewhere around between apl and bsl. I ended up cutting it.
Well when I grew it out this time it happened again..and it occurred to me that this has happened each time I got to that point. I just toughed it out and honestly once it reached a certain point it stopped. Strange but true. lol
Hope you find a solution to easer your headaches!

Chiquita Banana
January 27th, 2014, 10:34 PM
I used to get headaches with up-dos when my hair was around your length. I found that if I wore it up with a thinner stick it helped a lot (which took some experimenting to get it to work as I have ii/iii hair!). I also wore a lot of braids back then - protective style yet no headache. I rarely get a headache now.

Madora
January 28th, 2014, 10:42 AM
As my hair has gotten longer, I have felt the need to put my hair in more up-dos. However, no matter how loose the up-do, I get huge headaches to go with it. I have tried putting my hair in two french plaits to see if it would hurt less - due to weight distribution but I have had no joy. Even in a low ponytail I get a nagging ache in my scalp. I have tried different clips, scrunchies and pins, but no joy. As a child I used to wear my hair in ponytails all the time and my hair used to come to just above my tail bone. I never used to have headaches whatsoever.

Can anyone help me on this one? I apologize if there is already a thread like this, but I am very curious to find out.

Hmmm"ache in the scalp" means only one thing..your follicles are protesting to updos because the strands are being directed in a different way than usual.

The remedy is to slowly introduce your hair to each updo..i.e. wearing the style for an hour or so then taking it down. The next day, increase the length of time by 15 minutes, and if you can wear it w/o pain, the next day, increase the time to an additional 15 minutes. Continue this way until you can wear the style all day w/o pain.

As a person who had very thick hair, sectioning it really helps distribute the weight. When you braid, start the top of the braid semi loosely (you want to be able to insert the tip of your pinkie finger at the top of the braid). Also be careful when twisting..you don't want to put too much pressure on your hair where the twist begins.

If I'm wrong in my assumption and you suffer from headaches, then I'd see a physician. Your hairstyles shouldn't make your head hurt (unless you have a very sensitive scalp. Good luck!

jrmviola
January 28th, 2014, 11:20 AM
1.
It's worth considering, too, that loose updos aren't always the ones that don't pull. For me, something that has a little tension on most of the hairs ends up not hurting, but a very loose updo will pull on a few supporting sections while the rest will be too loose to help support the hair.

For me this is why i would get sensitive scalp. So for me a more tight (but not so tight you are ripping hairs) is more comfortable. However:

2. On my sister, who is a curly, like a 3, if she didnt detangle her hair daily her scalp would hurt after a few days, no matter what she did and:

3. On my mom (also a curly, but now a 2c) if she doesnt keep her scalp moisturized her scalp starts to hurt. And:

4. If I try too many intricate small braids my hair ends up being pulled in the wrong direction and that is very unconfortable too. When I take those down then its like blood rushing back to my head.

Hope that gives you ideas!

Inarticulation
January 28th, 2014, 03:31 PM
Just wanted to thank everyone for their great advice, it's been quite interesting, and I will try out some of the techniques mentioned.

ProverbsGirl: Oddly, I think I may be in the same boat as you, seeing that I never even used to have this issue!

Madora: I had never actually tried having a braid loose at the top, I'd never even thought of it actually. I just presumed that they should be tighter to stay in. I think my headaches are hair related, as it only aches when it is in an updo and I can feel the blood rushing back in my head after I take hair down. Seems strange, but its a strange tingly feeling.

Inarticulation
January 28th, 2014, 03:33 PM
I did try and quote more posts, but it never seemed to work :(

SkyChild
January 28th, 2014, 03:35 PM
This is really interesting.
I suffer from headaches at my current length (shoulder) but these are often actually eased by updos. I wonder if that'll change when it gets longer?
Anyone else get this feeling too?

Also, as a massage therapist I'm thinking about the tiny muscles in your scalp, around your hairline and at the base of your neck - maybe they just get tired and stretched at this length as your hair is thick? Try massaging them gently before your put your hair up, and also definitely when you take it down. This might ease them temporarily.

Perhaps after a certain amount of time they get used to it and hurt less? This would maybe account for other posters who have said theirs hurts at a certain length but actually improves when hair is longer. Maybe you have tiny body-builder muscles in your scalp that only seriously beef up past a certain point?!

dulce
January 28th, 2014, 07:44 PM
I used to have that problem with regular ponys,what worked for me is doing the pony,use a soft fabric cloth''elastic'', make sure it[elastic] is out a bit from my head,push the pony in to the scalp[creates a nice poufy look and reduces pull on roots] then clip with a large ficcare in this poufy position.No downward pull on roots equals no more headaches for me!

spirals
January 29th, 2014, 01:33 PM
I have heavy hair. I seem to have more trouble with twisted buns like the orchid or cinnabun. A lazy wrap or nautilus--not even sure what I'm doing--is better because it's a wrap bun. What really helps is wearing a headband with it, one that wraps all the way around the head, not a plastic one. It sits underneath the bun and supports the weight, and adds front interest. I often wear scarves as headbands, and they do the same thing.