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Medievalhair
September 10th, 2008, 02:04 PM
My mom and I were walking out of the Shoe Department(I was looking for some mary janes). I looked to my left and saw a flat/curling iron kiosk. I showed my mom and we went in the oppsite direction of the kiosk.

Medieval Hair

SHELIAANN1969
September 10th, 2008, 02:07 PM
I am confused, was the sad news that you didn't find the Mary Janes? Or that you walked away from the "torture devices" and were making a joke?

SweetPea88
September 10th, 2008, 02:09 PM
Hmm...I don't think I'm catching on either?

Gumball
September 10th, 2008, 02:09 PM
Well if that's her thing then that's her thing. As long as she's happy in the end who are we to complain? It's unfortunately the byproduct of a lot of us really trying to minimize the damage to our hair and looking at other things with a different point of view. I know sometimes I cringe when I know a friend is in love with straighteners/blowdryers/etc. but ultimately if that's what they want to do then that's what they want to do. If your mom eventually talks to you about the condition of her hair then put your opinion in there on a possible remedy. It's whatever makes the person happy. :)

Medievalhair
September 10th, 2008, 02:21 PM
I am confused, was the sad news that you didn't find the Mary Janes? Or that you walked away from the "torture devices" and were making a joke?

When I showed my mom, we decided not to walk to other side of the mall. And now I don't want to go to mall anymore with that kiosk there.

Gumball
September 10th, 2008, 02:29 PM
Most malls are likely to have a kiosk like that or something similar. I wouldn't necessarily not go to a place if they had only a single store (a kiosk at that) that I wouldn't want to go to. It's not too hard to walk on by. If it stops someone it stops someone. Even if it's someone you know that doesn't mean you have to stop to. Keep on walking. If you don't want to hang around there with them just say you'll meet them at [some location in the mall] afterward and head to a store you want to see. It's a good compromise.

SHELIAANN1969
September 10th, 2008, 02:33 PM
Ohhhhhh, now I get it...You must be stronger than the straightener (and the dude at the kiosk)

Tell him you will fry him up a good one if he thinks about coming near you!

At my mall, people are always trying to hawk junk from the kiosks, they have these lovely lovely Latin Serapes (like ponchos) but when I went to touch them, they're fleece and not the original wool, fleece and me = much static electricity, I hate fleece!

I was bummed, but at this multi-cultural festival I found a wool one yay!!!

Also in the kiosks, there are people flying these lame airplane toys, they have to do some weird thing with rubber bands to get them to fly, the ones you buy won't work like the ones they rigged up.

There are people with lotions and potions that reek, and they want to massage your hands with it, yuck!! No way, I asked the man what was in the concoction he was hawking, it was mineral oil, I was like no thanks, I use coconut or olive oil, and it's very very strong perfumey smelling as well.

I just get the "game face" on, the "don't touch me, don't come near me or don't try to sell me your crap" look, if they try and make eye contact, I look away, or if they do catch my eye, I say "nope, no cash, sorry!!"

You shouldn't allow these kiosks to ruin your fun time shopping with your mom, I say ignore them!! :)

SweetPea88
September 10th, 2008, 02:35 PM
I just get the "game face" on, the "don't touch me, don't come near me or don't try to sell me your crap" look, if they try and make eye contact, I look away, or if they do catch my eye, I say "nope, no cash, sorry!!"

You shouldn't allow these kiosks to ruin your fun time shopping with your mom, I say ignore them!! :)

That's my method as well!:p

Islandgrrl
September 10th, 2008, 03:31 PM
I wouldn't stop going to the mall just because there's a kiosk selling flat irons. Avoid the kiosk. Or just tell the kiosk guy/girl that you're not interested (perhaps adding that they might come away with a bloody stump if they even try to touch your hair).

There's always going to be someone selling something you either don't care for or don't agree with for whatever reason. You can't let that ruin your fun or run your life.

wintersun99
September 10th, 2008, 03:34 PM
.............

Cinnamon Hair
September 10th, 2008, 03:46 PM
Another good method is to completely ignore the kiosk people. Same goes for people trying to hand you flyers, or those miniature bibles, or whatever. Don't put out your hand to take the item and if they drop it that's their litter, not yours. If they try to talk to you, don't make eye contact and don't say anything. If you accidentally do make eye contact, give a mean look and shake your head "no." Works well for me.

longhairedfairy
September 10th, 2008, 03:50 PM
What's a kiosk?

SHELIAANN1969
September 10th, 2008, 03:50 PM
snip
(perhaps adding that they might come away with a bloody stump if they even try to touch your hair).



ROFL so hard at that one, I am picturing the dude with a real bloody stump, when asked at the hospital what happened,

he says "I tried to flat iron a gals hair" But at least he could cauterize his wound with the iron!! haaa omg, so hilarious:cheese:

SHELIAANN1969
September 10th, 2008, 03:54 PM
What's a kiosk?


It's a little booth or area, in the middle of a mall or other store that each vendor has, and they sell their own items.

Even the security guard or information area can be a "kiosk"

From websters.com


ki·osk Pronunciation: \ˈkē-ˌäsk\ Function: noun Etymology: Turkish köşk, from Persian kūshk portico Date: 1625 1 : an open summerhouse or pavilion 2 : a small structure with one or more open sides that is used to vend merchandise (as newspapers) or services (as film developing) 3 : a small stand-alone device providing information and services on a computer screen <a museum with interactive kiosks>

longhairedfairy
September 10th, 2008, 04:18 PM
Oh, I see. I thought that might be what it meant. I didn't know that was what they were called. Thanks! :)

CopperHead
September 10th, 2008, 04:33 PM
When I was in San Francisco with my friend not too long ago, a man at one of those kiosks was selling some kind of heated hair appliances. I had my hair half up and that seemed to attract his attention in a big way. My hair is very wavy and he wanted to get ahold of it with his straightening devices. I told him I don't use those things because of the damage and he was trying to tell me it wouldn't damage my hair. He was such a pain that he was actually following me. I just kept telling him I wasn't interested and tried not to become angry. He finally went back to his little torture chamber, but coming back he was still there. I just gave him a dirty look and kept on walking. My friend found the whole thing very amusing and it was, really. I am looking forward to going back there to torment him some more. ;)

Xanthippe
September 10th, 2008, 04:56 PM
I just say, "No thanks" and keep walking. I've never had a problem with it since I don't even slow down so they can't engage me in conversation.

twilight_faerie
September 10th, 2008, 05:38 PM
I understand how seeing people using a product that you consider harmful can be frustrating. That said, we don't ALL flee from the "evils" of hot tools. I have a fabulous tourmaline straightener that I use every now and then, and I love it. Does it damage my hair? Minimally. Will I stop using it because of that? No, because I *like* the way my hair looks straight. And that straightener is the only thing that will really straighten my hair. And I don't see what the point of having long hair is if I don't like the way it looks.

manderly
September 10th, 2008, 05:43 PM
Wow, seems odd that you would completely avoid a mall for having a kiosk like that.

Just ignore them. I generally put my sunglasses on, hold my cell phone up like I'm talking to someone, and walk right past as they go "Ma'am, ma'am, excuse me, miss?!"

They aren't going to grab me, hold me down, and straighten my hair or anything.

The annoying kiosks at my mall (there are many) was one right in front of Sephora (my playground!) and one right in the path I take to get to the bus stop.

Totally ignoring them works the best, otherwise you end up arguing with someone and feeling rude for not letting them buff your nails or something!

Aries_jb
September 10th, 2008, 06:26 PM
Well, on the one hand, it's annoying, but on the other hand, I try to understand that they are just doing their job. They probably work on commission and have to be pushy to get someone to buy something.

I just say "No thanks" or tell them I already have one :D, depending on the situation.

cuddledumplin
September 10th, 2008, 06:38 PM
We have one of those here, and they're always asking me to let them straighten my hair, but I always politely decline.

happymommy
September 10th, 2008, 08:44 PM
Those vultures operate on the same principle as door to door salesmen. If they can make eye contact and engage, it goes against our, the consumers, learned social behavior to not show rejection or rudeness when someone is smiling at us expectantly.

You can, if you are evil like me, play with them :) If they want to know if they can straighten your hair, look them dead in the eye, and ask:

Why? Do you normally tell people their hair looks terrible and they need you, a perfect stranger to fix it for them. Do I look totally incapable of performing even the simplest hair tasks so that you feel the need to instruct me in the operation of a curling iron? What makes you qualified to tell me that the current condition of my hair is not it's peak?

:D Hee. My husband hates going to the mall with me. :D

You should hear me when those contact allergic dermatitis pervayors come at me with their overpriced overperfumed over processed skin treatments. One incident of yelling about blistered lesions and possible transmitted topical herpes simplexes and now my DH makes me walk on the other side of him. >:)

FrannyG
September 10th, 2008, 09:55 PM
Sweetie, I read through this entire thread, and I'm still befuddled. Why would you not want to go to that mall anymore? There are many kiosks that I'm not fond of in any given mall.

Are you afraid they're going to grab you against your will and straighten your hair? Honestly, that is more than highly unlikely.

If they try to talk to you, just walk on by. With your hair type, they're unlikely to bother you anyway. :flower:

Oberon88
September 10th, 2008, 10:03 PM
I had one lady wielding a straightener chase me down one time in our local mall. I wasn't only worried about my hair, but about the burns I thought I was going to receive from the slightly smoking flatiron.

happymommy I do the same thing, my friends have started refusing to walk with me in public.

tinabcurly
September 10th, 2008, 10:23 PM
I had one lady wielding a straightener chase me down one time in our local mall....

Jeez- can you say pushy? She definitely needed a bloody stump threat!!

No need to avoid the mall completely. Just give the straightener kiosk people the evil eye. You know, the come-near-me-and-your-mother-won't-recognize-you stare? Stops 'em dead. It's actually fun to scare the heck out of em.

Ndnlady
September 10th, 2008, 10:51 PM
Don't stop going to the mall just because of those annoying kiosks!:) I always in a firm voice say to them that I am not interested wave my arm at them as if they were an annoying fly and then ignore them. The evil stink-eye glare helps too!:)

Medievalhair
September 10th, 2008, 11:10 PM
That day I had my hair in a low braid, that was damp. I didn't want the lady grabbing my hair.
Thats why I didn't go near it. I wouldn't have minded it if my braid was or in bun.

Arctic_Mama
September 11th, 2008, 05:31 AM
Man, I must look super scary and imposing for all of my five feet of height... nobody EVER comes up to me hawking products, nor do they try to touch my babies even though they obviously think they're cute. I must have a constant glare on or something - but if it protects my hair and keeps nasty hands off my kids, all the better :twisted:

Tap Dancer
September 11th, 2008, 05:37 AM
I've never seen those kiosks before but our mall is pretty small.... Anyway, just ignore them. Why shouldn't you go to the mall just because someone is selling something (or offering services?) you don't like? :confused:

ChloeDharma
September 11th, 2008, 05:48 AM
I live in a place called Bromley which has a shopping centre and a long high street so it's known for the shopping. I actually saw one of those kiosks selling straighteners and tongs the last couple of times i walked through the shopping centre and had my reaction ready for if the bloke tried anything.
Actually it was quite nice because i was with my dad one of the times and he asked me about them, he already worked out that it probably wasn't good for the hair, then as i was explaining as we walked past we saw smoke coming off the hair of the girl being demonstrated on, not a teensy whisp.....loads of it.

I wouldn't not go there just because of this, i'm not obliged to sit there if they ask, and if they wont take a polite but firm "no thanks" then i usually find "f*** off!" normally works. But i do have a scary face when i'm in a mood and can have quite an aggressive vibe.

sexyjacksparrow
September 11th, 2008, 06:02 AM
We have these in the UK too. I've occasionally had them brandish the straightners at me and ask if they could do my hair. I always say no and that I already have a set thanks (true!) or if I'm really not in the mood "no thanks - I happen to LIKE my curls!"

Carolyn
September 11th, 2008, 08:31 AM
I can't see avoiding going to the mall because of one little kiosk :rolleyes: Wouldn't that be cutting your nose off to spite your face? Just walk on by and ignore the guy. If he says something just say NO very firmly and keep on walking. If he persists tell him to F-off very loudly and scream for mall security if he says anything else. I wouldn't be concerned about other people who choose to buy and iron or let him work on their hair. It's not your concern.

ClareDee
September 11th, 2008, 01:26 PM
I think it's sufficient to politely decline...

There's no need for glares or snarls or anything aggressive unless someone is aggressive with you first.

I worked in retail for a couple of years, and part of my job was to ask customers if they needed help with their shopping. Of course some customers were irritated by this, and some would snap "NO!" at me, clutching their handbag to their chest and racing away, as if I had just asked to rifle through it.

It made me feel awful. I was just doing my job as I was instructed to do it. I always appreciated it when people would politely say "I'm just browsing, thanks". No trouble on their part. No feeling of being some kind of outcast on mine.

Most of the time, it's possible to deal with these things politely and calmly. :cool:

Rain
September 11th, 2008, 02:05 PM
When I showed my mom, we decided not to walk to other side of the mall. And now I don't want to go to mall anymore with that kiosk there.

There's a flat iron kiosk right outside The Body Shop at the mall by my house. The guy who works there stopped bothering me a while ago. I glare at him evilly sometimes just in case he forgets. Leave me alone, buddy! No means no!

CopperHead
September 11th, 2008, 03:43 PM
The one I had to walk by was on my way to the Bare Escentuals boutique. Nobody keeps me away from that store. ;) This mall has never had kiosks before, so I was more than a little surprised to see them. The man working there was very obnoxious and started to follow me. No means no. :rolleyes:

longhairedfairy
September 11th, 2008, 06:10 PM
We had a rather aggressive one in the mall a couple Christmas seasons ago selling that Dead Sea scrub. I tried it and it did make my hands soft, but it started to burn a few minutes later and, dang, that stuff is expensive! I didn't actually buy it, of course, but he was pretty determined. It was annoying, but he wasn't deliberately rude and I understand that he's just trying to make a living:/ I imagine it's kind of like telesales, which I've done before.

SHELIAANN1969
September 11th, 2008, 07:05 PM
We had a rather aggressive one in the mall a couple Christmas seasons ago selling that Dead Sea scrub. I tried it and it did make my hands soft, but it started to burn a few minutes later and, dang, that stuff is expensive! I didn't actually buy it, of course, but he was pretty determined. It was annoying, but he wasn't deliberately rude and I understand that he's just trying to make a living:/ I imagine it's kind of like telesales, which I've done before.

Yeah, the dead sea scrub people are the ones I was talking about! That crap is expensive, something like 20$ for 6 oz, yeah righto. I told the dude I make my own soap and don't use anything but essential oils and I do NOT use mineral oil, he acted like it was the best damn thing since buttered popcorn, and I had the ewwwwwww face on, yuck.

What a load of bull, I don't want none of their crap, sorry but go hawk that crap to someone else! Yeah, we all need to make money but find some other way that's more profitable.

Geez, kiosk people-- tee hee-- some of them aren't that bad, the people from other countries are usually laid back and respectful, but the american ones, they're like bulldogs (no offence to bulldogs) haha

longhairedfairy
September 11th, 2008, 10:04 PM
I think this one actually wasn't American. He had a rather heavy accent, anyway.

morningstar
September 11th, 2008, 10:35 PM
I don't understand not going somewhere you want to go because of a flat iron?????
Just don't make eye contact. That is really the bait there. My mom looks interested as she walks and gets hand messages, perfume sprays and all sorts of crap tried on her.
I just keep walking as they say "blah blah blah?" I don't even turn around. I told my mom to quit looking at these people. Dang just keep going. I don't like what malls have turned into. I hate that these people come to grab you like at a market place selling their wares.
You really just need to assert yourself.

SurprisingWoman
September 12th, 2008, 12:32 AM
If you want some practice on saying No to people and getting your "game face" on then go to Jamaica! We went there in January and we walked around town. I left my hair down on purpose, just to see what happened. I have NEVER had so many hair offers of various kinds :eyeroll: in my life! It was actually kind of fun and everyone accepted that no means no.

CountessDeJager
September 12th, 2008, 01:38 AM
That day I had my hair in a low braid, that was damp. I didn't want the lady grabbing my hair.
Thats why I didn't go near it. I wouldn't have minded it if my braid was or in bun.

I think you would be okay walking past the cart with you mother at your side, Medievalhair. Moms are pretty good at making sure their daughter is not touched or bothered. Most salespeople will be good at reading your body language and know you are not an interested customer. If it really is too upsetting for you mom can even be sent ahead to tell the cart lady that you wish to be ignored as you walk by. The saleswoman doesn't want to be the cause of unhappiness.


When I was in San Francisco with my friend not too long ago, a man at one of those kiosks was selling some kind of heated hair appliances. I had my hair half up and that seemed to attract his attention in a big way. My hair is very wavy and he wanted to get ahold of it with his straightening devices. I told him I don't use those things because of the damage and he was trying to tell me it wouldn't damage my hair. He was such a pain that he was actually following me. I just kept telling him I wasn't interested and tried not to become angry. He finally went back to his little torture chamber, but coming back he was still there. I just gave him a dirty look and kept on walking. My friend found the whole thing very amusing and it was, really. I am looking forward to going back there to torment him some more. ;)


The one I had to walk by was on my way to the Bare Escentuals boutique. Nobody keeps me away from that store. ;) This mall has never had kiosks before, so I was more than a little surprised to see them. The man working there was very obnoxious and started to follow me. No means no. :rolleyes:

That sounds like the guy I once encountered at the Market Street Westfield above the Powell Street BART station! The passionate insistence it doesn't hurt hair sounds familiar. I passed the curl/straighten magic product kiosk on my way to The Sock Market :cloud9: and decided to ask if the tool impacted the condition of the hair. Strangely he asserted it would improve the hair through use. :bs: When I questioned that claim asking if it was a heat product I gestured to my hair in a single braid I told him any damage would take me at least 10 years to grow out injury so it wasn't a small matter.

Obnoxious certainly is the word for this guy's reaction as he agitatedly chastised me for interrupting his sales speech and not listening to him. "You won't let me answer your question if you keep interrupting me! You aren't listening!" A clarification about the product operation is an interruption? Way to go alienating a potential customer asking about your product. :confused: A useful response would have been to acknowledge that I do have to be careful protecting the hair that took many years to achieve and why this product means my hair is in good hands.

Come back and we can tease him together, CopperHead! :pins: That is if he is still there, I don't really think that job suits him.

longhairedfairy
September 12th, 2008, 01:48 AM
If you want some practice on saying No to people and getting your "game face" on then go to Jamaica! We went there in January and we walked around town. I left my hair down on purpose, just to see what happened. I have NEVER had so many hair offers of various kinds :eyeroll: in my life! It was actually kind of fun and everyone accepted that no means no.



Wow, SurprisingWoman, isn't it hot in Jamaica to wear hair down?

ETA: I figured how to get it to quote on this laptop! I have to copy and paste the whole thing and post it in the Quick Reply box. Now if I can get it to post new threads and PM...

longhairedfairy
September 12th, 2008, 01:54 AM
snippety-snip/
That sounds like the guy I once encountered at the Market Street Westfield above the Powell Street BART station! The passionate insistence it doesn't hurt hair sounds familiar. I passed the curl/straighten magic product kiosk on my way to The Sock Market and decided to ask if the tool impacted the condition of the hair. Strangely he asserted it would improve the hair through use. When I questioned that claim asking if it was a heat product I gestured to my hair in a single braid I told him any damage would take me at least 10 years to grow out injury so it wasn't a small matter.
Obnoxious certainly is the word for this guy's reaction as he agitatedly chastised me for interrupting his sales speech and not listening to him. "You won't let me answer your question if you keep interrupting me! You aren't listening!" A clarification about the product operation is an interruption? Way to go alienating a potential customer asking about your product. A useful response would have been to acknowledge that I do have to be careful protecting the hair that took many years to achieve and why this product means my hair is in good hands.

How incredibly rude. Asking a question directly related to the product is in no way interrupting.

Chrissy
September 12th, 2008, 05:46 AM
To me it's OK to approach someone with your product but when I say no and I'm totally ignored that angers me. It makes me feel like because they talk alot of crap that I'm just suddenly going to change my mind, yeah right. I had a guy recently at a kiosk trying to sell me whatever it was, I don't even remember now. I politely told him no and he kept going on and on. Now I'm a fairly nice person but I hate pushy salesmen!! So I just stopped and looked him dead in the face and basically said you asked me if I was interested I said no. What part of no don't you understand. I told him I thought he was very rude to keep asking me the same question when I already had answered him. I didn't cuss, I didn't yell but I said it in a firm matter. I was pissed! So he left me alone after that. Unfortunatly this particular kiosk was smack in the middle of the mall. So the many aisles all led there. I had to pass him again several times going to different stores. Each time he left me alone. Like I said I understand people are trying to run a business and sell there items but if I say no I mean no! I can't be talked into something after I have already made up my mind. After that if you keep harrassing me you will get in trouble! :) Oh and yes please don't avoid an entire mall just because of this. When you said sad news I thought someone had died or something.

Eirinn
September 12th, 2008, 01:14 PM
When I showed my mom, we decided not to walk to other side of the mall. And now I don't want to go to mall anymore with that kiosk there.

Aren't you overreacting? Is *only* about hair, not human life...

SHELIAANN1969
September 12th, 2008, 02:47 PM
I think it's sufficient to politely decline...

There's no need for glares or snarls or anything aggressive unless someone is aggressive with you first.

I worked in retail for a couple of years, and part of my job was to ask customers if they needed help with their shopping. Of course some customers were irritated by this, and some would snap "NO!" at me, clutching their handbag to their chest and racing away, as if I had just asked to rifle through it.

It made me feel awful. I was just doing my job as I was instructed to do it. I always appreciated it when people would politely say "I'm just browsing, thanks". No trouble on their part. No feeling of being some kind of outcast on mine.

Most of the time, it's possible to deal with these things politely and calmly. :cool:


This is a different situation though, you are describing a scenario where you were the sales clerk, in a store, that a potential customer went to 'specificially" to shop.

In these situations I always say, "thanks, I'm just looking around" and if I do need help, I will go to them.
I have never met a REALLY pushy sales clerk except in furniture stores or Circuit City.

But these kiosk people are a whole different kettle of fish, they are more like sharks and barracudas. They don't take no for an answer, they follow, try to tell you how this product is so so wonderful etc. (even after you have said NO!) and they sell shoddy merchandise as well (in most cases)

My nephew was about 4 years old and my mom bought this 'amazing flying styrofoam airplane' from a kiosk for like $25-$30 and it flew really high and far in the mall.

We get home, and it sucked!

We go back, the guy says oh, here is a different one, this will work. we go back home (mind you the mall is 10 miles from us) and it didn't work, it was a dud, like the last one.

We go to the mall and were told that they actally "modified" their airplanes to fly far, fast and high. But the ones they sold, were pure junk.

We went back again and the guy said well, I can exchange it again, but this is the last time. I had to get rude with the guy and demand a refund, we had the receipt, they didn't say "no refunds" and they modified the plane or helicopter with items and knowledge that we didn't have or couldn't obtain.

After standing there making a scene, we got a refund, I was so so mad, they try and get the parents/ grandparents to buy it for the kids, acting like it's so cool, and it's crap. It's frustrating to be taken like that.

And a lot of them chase you, saying 'look at this, look at what this can do" etc. Ick!

That's completely different issue, seriously, those kiosk folks are nuts!

danacc
September 14th, 2008, 06:15 PM
I was taught to say "no" 3 times. The first time, the "no" comes with an explanation, just a short one if that's all that is warranted. "No, I'm not interested, thanks", "No, I don't have time, thanks", or "Not right now, I'm just looking, thanks."

The second "no" is a simple: "No, thank you".

The third "no" is a firm and straightforward "No", then I move on physically, or change the subject, or start a conversation with somebody else.

This serves me well in interactions except in sales situations. Because salespeople are instructed or trained to be pushy. So, I shortened it to saying "no" twice. The first type followed by the third. But I got tired of this, so now I just say "no" once. I always use the first type. Then the conversation is over from my side. For a phone call, I hang up if they decide to launch into a lengthier pitch. That's the simplest and was the easiest for me to learn to handle. For kiosks, I just keep walking (when I'm not interested, I don't stop to deliver the answer, they'll follow long enough to hear "no, I'm not interested, thanks"). I also no longer will make eye contact with them, and just generally behave as though I do not hear them.

Never has a salesperson in a store I have entered push after I say "No, thank you, I'm just looking." It is the unsolicited sales people that are rude in purposefully ignoring that first "no". I choose to not spend any more energy on them in that case. (I love the annoying fly analogy a previous poster used.)

danacc
September 14th, 2008, 06:22 PM
Oh! I forgot to add that I've never had them grab me or my hair. They are rude, but do not actually seize people. That would be dangerous ground in the US, indeed.

Malls usually have lots of people around. If they were to grab any part of me, I would not hesitate in SCREAMING, "Let me go! Stranger! Stranger!" The salesperson does not want that kind of publicity.

sedonia
September 14th, 2008, 06:22 PM
Flat irons and curling irons aren't necessarily damaging to shorter lengths of hair. For example, shoulder length hair, or even armpit length hair. If that is the length you are keeping it, then the damaged hair will get trimmed off on a regular basis as the damage accrues. So in other words, for most of the population, these instruments are not bad or evil at all.

Denebi
September 14th, 2008, 06:39 PM
Hmm, last week I was in a mall and they had such a terrible hair burning kiosk. First thing I noticed was the torturing iron, so I was warned! I then used my "pretend-to-have-NO-hair" face and walked by, the evil, flaming girls just smiling at me. I did it two times... no reaction. So it worked ;)
Maybe the fact that my hair was secured in a figure-8 bun, not showing if it has any potential to be straightened helped also. On the other hand, I saw them using the iron on really short (and perfectly straight!) hair. Strange thing... really...

I had to get rid of some other salesmen on the way further. I always did it with a polite smile and apologizing little waving of hands, and it always worked just fine. I think, you do not have to fear any harm when declining such offers politely.

Juanita
September 14th, 2008, 06:47 PM
Say no thanks and then ignore them.
Will have to practise my termah kasih, tidak mau (Thank you no) to all the wanna be braiders of my hair in Bali in November. My Fine thin hair in lots of little braids. I don't think so.

Juanita
September 14th, 2008, 06:51 PM
Terima kasih !!! spelling

eml298
September 14th, 2008, 07:20 PM
I also hate those kiosks. I feel sorry for the people working there, but not sorry enough to get near their junk. I agree with other folks - say no thanks and keep walking! Don't let it prevent you from doing things you enjoy. ;)

~GypsyCurls~
September 15th, 2008, 05:33 PM
Those kiosks suck. As a curly haired woman, I guess they look at me and think I must me in dismay over it-as if curly hair is something that must be "fixed". I understand that it is their job to sell, but the mall I used to work in had one of those kiosks and they would approach me every day! It got really annoying really fast...

Erin1152
September 18th, 2008, 01:46 PM
Forgive me for a moment..

SHELIAANN1969 - You have such amazing hair! I've always wanted red curly hair.. It's so unique.

Ok, i'm done.

SHELIAANN1969
September 18th, 2008, 03:06 PM
Forgive me for a moment..

SHELIAANN1969 - You have such amazing hair! I've always wanted red curly hair.. It's so unique.

Ok, i'm done.


Wow, thank you Erin, that's very kind! :blossom:

SHELIAANN1969
September 18th, 2008, 03:16 PM
Oh! I forgot to add that I've never had them grab me or my hair. They are rude, but do not actually seize people. That would be dangerous ground in the US, indeed.

Malls usually have lots of people around. If they were to grab any part of me, I would not hesitate in SCREAMING, "Let me go! Stranger! Stranger!" The salesperson does not want that kind of publicity.


OMG, I am rofl here, I will seriously do that if anyone ever touches or accosts me at a kiosk!!

I am dying with laughter at that mental picture, people staring, security being called, hot iron hair guy looking shocked, hehehe!

MadHatter
September 18th, 2008, 04:56 PM
.... Heheh, hot iron guy getting burned with his iron....

LadyLongLocks
September 18th, 2008, 05:15 PM
I went to a mall a couple weeks ago with a friend who had floor length hair. A man from a kiosk came running up behind us and asked my friend if he could do her hair. He had some sort of heated crimping/curling/straightener he was selling. She asked if it used heat, he said "yes". She replied that she never used heat on her hair and declined. I had my hair up so nobody bothered me! I also noticed that if you are on your phone, they tend to leave you alone.