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Monkshood
January 18th, 2014, 10:08 PM
I love the look of braided buns, but Iím struggling with getting them to stay up securely. The best I can do right now is a few minutes with a stick and a few hours with forks. The latter are difficult to push through and I often end up with a deformed bun... and a few broken strands, even when I'm being careful (always). I must be doing something wrong! Iíve been inserting the forks like I would a stick, starting at the outer edge of the bun, grabbing some scalp hair and then pushing through, slowly. Is there a better way that I should know about? Or should I invest in some pins?

furnival
January 19th, 2014, 01:12 AM
Two words: spin pins! :)

You can use them on their own or after inserting a fork/stick and they are the only way I've found to make a bombproof braided bun.

Nini
January 19th, 2014, 01:54 AM
Is your fork curved? I find they work better for me than straight ones. I insert the same way I would use sticks. Although for braided buns I usually make a ponytail first to anchor it somewhere.

It might be you should try to make your bun just a tad bit looser too. Worth a shot anyways:)

woolyleprechaun
January 19th, 2014, 02:20 AM
It depends on a lot of things. How long and thick is your hair? If you have a long enough braid, you can do a variation on the lazy wrap or nautilus bun. Also, you can consider making one from two or more braids ('oval bun' is a good one)
For me, the only way I can get a standard, braided cinnabun to hold with a stick is as follows- Arrange braid so it is slightly flattened in the bun shape. Insert the stick either between braid 'bumps' or through one, so you don't mess up the braid pattern. Flip the stick 90 degrees so it's flat against your head and carefully 'weave' through the bun, catching both braid and scalp hair. When the stick exits, I like to get it so it catches a braid link. I never start a bun by catching hair outside the bun (I use the flip method, like when using Amish pins), as it puts too much stress on that bit for my liking. Hope that helps!

MinderMutsig
January 19th, 2014, 02:31 AM
The trick is not to braid and bun too tightly. Sounds counterintuitive I know but try it the next time. If you get broken hair just from inserting a stick or fork then the whole thing is too tight and tight braids fight to go straight again in stead of staying put in a bun.

ashke50
January 19th, 2014, 07:54 AM
I've never managed to hold a braided bun with a stick, but spin pins work perfectly! Depending on the style flexi8s sometimes work for me too.

walterSCAN
January 19th, 2014, 08:34 AM
When I bun a braid, I never try to insert the stick/ fork through the braid itself-- I treat the braid like a single long strand of hair, if that makes any sense. I do treat the scalp hair like regular hair, though. ;) (not sure how else to explain it, I usually do a lazy wrap or nautilus/ artemis bun with a braid... let me know if this is confusing)

I'll also echo everyone who has said that you don't want the braid or the bun to be too tight, as that is usually where deformed buns and snapped strands come from.

Monkshood
January 19th, 2014, 01:20 PM
My hair is thick and coarse, so not at all slippery but quite heavy. I'm close to hip. I can't do a lazy wrap or a nautilus yet, let alone braided ones! Sadly. My buns do tend to be on the tighter side, mainly because it's hard to tuck my ends otherwise. I have practically no taper and my tassel is so stiff you could probably use it as a paintbrush.

I've been meaning to get spin pins, but I always balk at the price. How likely it is that they would not work in my hair and how easy are they to use for someone who, say, has never even managed to figure out bobby pins? How many do you think I would need? It's $6 for two here, yikes.

I just got a two prong Jeterfork in the mail. It's slightly curved, whereas my usual fork from PENSandPICS is straight. I will experiment with both and keep these tips in mind. Thanks everyone!

walterSCAN
January 19th, 2014, 02:02 PM
My hair is thick and coarse, so not at all slippery but quite heavy. I'm close to hip. I can't do a lazy wrap or a nautilus yet, let alone braided ones! Sadly. My buns do tend to be on the tighter side, mainly because it's hard to tuck my ends otherwise. I have practically no taper and my tassel is so stiff you could probably use it as a paintbrush.

I've been meaning to get spin pins, but I always balk at the price. How likely it is that they would not work in my hair and how easy are they to use for someone who, say, has never even managed to figure out bobby pins? How many do you think I would need? It's $6 for two here, yikes.

I just got a two prong Jeterfork in the mail. It's slightly curved, whereas my usual fork from PENSandPICS is straight. I will experiment with both and keep these tips in mind. Thanks everyone!

Man, if you lived anywhere near me, I'd give you my two spin pins to try! I think they're really cool in concept, my hair just doesn't like them and I feel like I would need 6 or so to distribute the weight of a bun evenly. However, I've seen members with thicker/ heavier hair than mine that love them and get by with 2. My hair is just contrary. And fine. I think the fineness has something to do with it too. And yes, they were pretty expensive for my hair to just summarily dismiss them! Grrr. ;)

Stiria
January 19th, 2014, 02:04 PM
I like a braided cinnmon bun, but it is not very secure with a fork. I get the best result with bended knittingneedles. Works like a charm:)
Mind you, I have never tried spin pins.

Monkshood
January 19th, 2014, 02:42 PM
Man, if you lived anywhere near me, I'd give you my two spin pins to try! I think they're really cool in concept, my hair just doesn't like them and I feel like I would need 6 or so to distribute the weight of a bun evenly. However, I've seen members with thicker/ heavier hair than mine that love them and get by with 2. My hair is just contrary. And fine. I think the fineness has something to do with it too. And yes, they were pretty expensive for my hair to just summarily dismiss them! Grrr. ;)

I got a giftcard to the drugstore for Christmas and now I wish I had thought of using it to buy some spin pins. I got cough syrup and toilet paper instead... what a gift! I guess I'll have to buy a pack next time around and hope for the best.


I like a braided cinnmon bun, but it is not very secure with a fork. I get the best result with bended knittingneedles. Works like a charm:)
Mind you, I have never tried spin pins.

A bent knitting needle, really? Did you bend it yourself? Do tell me more!

YamaMaya
January 19th, 2014, 02:57 PM
I love my spin pins, they hold my hair like a rock, and much MUCH easier than bobby pins, you just screw them into your hair and when you want to take them out spin them the opposite way until they're all the way out. Easy peasy, just make sure you grab a little bit of scalp hair along with bun hair.

Stiria
January 19th, 2014, 03:24 PM
Monkshood: Yes I bent it myself:p The thin ones are rather easy to bend. I got the idea afer seeing some of Quattro's forks, but I am pretty sure I have seen people on this site do the same. I use two or three to hold a braided cinnamon bun.

QuillEnchanted
January 20th, 2014, 03:15 PM
Oh, you sound like me when I was at waist length hair.
I, too, have coarse hair which can be rather thick at times.

I used to need about 20 bobby pins to get my hair up in a simple bun for figure skating (meaning it had to hold really well), but I could get by with two spin pins and maybe 2 bobby pins total if I used the spin pins instead. They make life so much easier for me, and they stay exceptionally well with braided hair.

Two other things for a braided bun:
1. Once my hair finally hit hip (okay, actually, past hip), I could easily do some of the braided buns that just hadn't stayed before. With thicker hair, it seems that more length is necessary to get things to work. I can still barely do a nautilus, for what it's worth.
2. Try splitting your hair into two braids and bunning them that way. The thinner braids seem to stay a bit better and fight the bun less.

Hope that helps!

chen bao jun
January 20th, 2014, 03:47 PM
Anybody wanting spin pins should try ebay. and also they are sometimes at the real dollar store (where things are actually a dollar) although they go fast.

Scarlet_Heart
January 20th, 2014, 04:02 PM
Your hair needs to be pretty long (maybe waist at least depending on thickness) to get away with this, but I've always loved the French braided bun. It's the most secure bun I've ever used. Here's a pic. Sorry if it comes out big. As you can see, one stick (if well placed) is sufficient.

http://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h114/eelaynuh/DSC09590.jpg (http://s62.photobucket.com/user/eelaynuh/media/DSC09590.jpg.html)

If your hair is too short for this style, never fear! Because you can start off with French braid as before, and then simply roll and tuck like this.

http://i62.photobucket.com/albums/h114/eelaynuh/971498_10104642131717714_536960897_n_zpsb07c7f21.j pg (http://s62.photobucket.com/user/eelaynuh/media/971498_10104642131717714_536960897_n_zpsb07c7f21.j pg.html)

I find both to be very secure and won't budge all day. I prefer the bun to the tuck, but I had a trimming disaster last year and currently can't quite achieve the bun.

In any event, I hope this helps!

Monkshood
January 20th, 2014, 04:30 PM
Monkshood: Yes I bent it myself:p The thin ones are rather easy to bend. I got the idea afer seeing some of Quattro's forks, but I am pretty sure I have seen people on this site do the same. I use two or three to hold a braided cinnamon bun.

Brilliant. I was interested by the Quattro U pins, but $31 + $9 shipping to Canada for such plain looking things that will be completely hidden in my hair? I can't.


Oh, you sound like me when I was at waist length hair.
I, too, have coarse hair which can be rather thick at times.

I used to need about 20 bobby pins to get my hair up in a simple bun for figure skating (meaning it had to hold really well), but I could get by with two spin pins and maybe 2 bobby pins total if I used the spin pins instead. They make life so much easier for me, and they stay exceptionally well with braided hair.

Two other things for a braided bun:
1. Once my hair finally hit hip (okay, actually, past hip), I could easily do some of the braided buns that just hadn't stayed before. With thicker hair, it seems that more length is necessary to get things to work. I can still barely do a nautilus, for what it's worth.
2. Try splitting your hair into two braids and bunning them that way. The thinner braids seem to stay a bit better and fight the bun less.

Hope that helps!

I do a double braided bun sometimes (following the instructions found in a post by Madora on here), but this one is even harder to get right. It does make it easier to do the actual bunning, but there's always one braid that manages to eventually escape. I probably just need more practice. It makes my bun looks awesomely intricate, which I love.


Your hair needs to be pretty long (maybe waist at least depending on thickness) to get away with this, but I've always loved the French braided bun. It's the most secure bun I've ever used. Here's a pic. Sorry if it comes out big. As you can see, one stick (if well placed) is sufficient.



If your hair is too short for this style, never fear! Because you can start off with French braid as before, and then simply roll and tuck like this.



I find both to be very secure and won't budge all day. I prefer the bun to the tuck, but I had a trimming disaster last year and currently can't quite achieve the bun.

In any event, I hope this helps!

I definitely need more length for this. I can do a pretty neat French braid, but the tail is too short to be bunned properly. I love the idea of tucking the braid under itself. It looks absolutely beautiful in your hair!


You guys have convinced me. I will be getting a pack of spin pins very soon. I wish I could get them cheaper on ebay, but being in Canada, that is not happening... Unless I get some knockoffs. Are these just as good as the Goody ones?

I'll report back, hopefully with pictures of a very solid, neat-looking bun. Thanks again everyone, all of those tips are very helpful!

Komao
January 20th, 2014, 04:48 PM
Hi, I purchased spin pins, 2 for under $3 at Walmart. I have near hip length thick hair and they really hold. I also have used my double point needles or regular knitting needle but never have bent them, I need them for my knitting, too.:knit:
Just recently with the length, I can easily put it in a nautilus bun. I love that as it's so easy. I also love the French Braid bun and it is really secure. :)

Monkshood
January 20th, 2014, 04:57 PM
I can't wait to be able to do a nautilus (and etc.)!

I don't remember how much they are at Walmart, but definitely over $3, otherwise I would have bought them for sure. Everything is always so much more expensive here.

Lissandria
January 20th, 2014, 04:58 PM
I find ficcares give me a rock solid braided bun, especially if I do a rope braid.

Monkshood
January 20th, 2014, 05:12 PM
I nearly bought a Ficcare earlier this month, but decided to get a new fork instead. I know I will get one eventually. I'm just a little worried they wouldn't work in my hair.

Stiria
January 21st, 2014, 07:59 AM
Brilliant. I was interested by the Quattro U pins, but $31 + $9 shipping to Canada for such plain looking things that will be completely hidden in my hair? I can't.

Thats what I thought too. For that amount of money I want something pretty.

melusine963
January 21st, 2014, 10:17 AM
Spin pins are great, as many people here have suggested. If you're able to french braid, that will also create a very good base for a braided bun. Somehow it gives hair pins/sticks something to grip against without sliding out straight away.

Gumball
January 21st, 2014, 10:33 AM
A stick gives me a really solid point for a braided bun, whether I braided and wrapped loosely or tightly, like this:

http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=7417&d=1384016323 (http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/album.php?albumid=10815&attachmentid=7417)

I do a regular three strand braid and insert the stick before I wrap the bun. It goes right through the base of the braid, so that little bit in the middle you see the stick going through is where the three strands of my braid first cross. Sometimes I'll insert the stick through a wider portion of the hair in the back, still through the base, if I want the bun to be a bit wider. This became a much better go-to as my braid got longer, so I can't give too much perspective for using shorter braids as I didn't do this when my braid was much shorter than it is now. If it can wrap 1.5-2 times around or more, then I think it should work out well.

Once the stick is in, the braid wraps around between the stick and my head, tucking the end underneath everything, so the stick pretty much holds the bun to my head. If it doesn't hold perfectly, try having just a little longer tassel to wrap around the middle. That can bolster the stability if it's not working for you. The worst thing I might encounter is if the end starts peeking out, but I just tuck it back in and I'm good again.


When I bun a braid, I never try to insert the stick/ fork through the braid itself-- I treat the braid like a single long strand of hair, if that makes any sense. I do treat the scalp hair like regular hair, though. ;) (not sure how else to explain it, I usually do a lazy wrap or nautilus/ artemis bun with a braid... let me know if this is confusing)

I'll also echo everyone who has said that you don't want the braid or the bun to be too tight, as that is usually where deformed buns and snapped strands come from.

:agree: Definitely. People often don't realize that you don't have to braid tightly, but instead braid snugly if loose braids aren't what you're desiring at a given time.

For me, I used to do a braided nautilus every morning, but found that the cinnabun seems to hold my hair more favorably to me.

spidermom
January 21st, 2014, 10:42 AM
What works best for me is to make a dutch braid or french braid, put a stick under the braid at my chosen placement for the bun, then wind the braid around behind the stick. Then I use another stick to anchor the outer ring of the wrapped braid in a place that keeps the end tucked where I put it.

spidermom
January 21st, 2014, 10:44 AM
Oh, and agree with no braiding tightly. I found that it helped me get the proper tension when I would think of folding each strand into place. (just a mind trick)

Scarlet_Heart
January 21st, 2014, 05:22 PM
Oh Gumball, your skills never cease to amaze me. I'm going to try your method there and see if it works for me. I'm not quite at waist yet though so that might be an issue. If so, then I'll just store it in the old mind safe for later. ;)

GoddesJourney
January 21st, 2014, 05:40 PM
Spin pins are absolutely nothing like bobby pins because they actually work. I know they are a steep price or so it seems, but they are quite sturdy so they won't break or fall out. Bobby pins have to come in large packs because you will lose or break them quickly and need millions of them to try to make something stay.

Selkie-
January 22nd, 2014, 06:39 AM
I use a couple of crimped hair pins and they hold my MBL braided bun very well. :)

Scarlet_Heart
January 22nd, 2014, 08:54 AM
I like my spin pins for some things, but I really love these "Magic Grip" pins (http://www.easycomforts.com/buy-magic-grip-hair-pins-333482&cmp=compare_shop?SourceCode=ECGOOGLESHOPPING&CAWELAID=1350248964&catargetid=320013550000001217&cadevice=c&cagpspn=pla). I think I got an off-brand kind at Walgreens or something.

Anyway, they are great and much sturdier than bobby pins or the crimped pins. I like to use them if I do a bun and parts are sticking out. I can tuck them really easily with these.

Monkshood
January 23rd, 2014, 05:28 PM
When I bun a braid, I never try to insert the stick/ fork through the braid itself-- I treat the braid like a single long strand of hair, if that makes any sense. I do treat the scalp hair like regular hair, though. (not sure how else to explain it, I usually do a lazy wrap or nautilus/ artemis bun with a braid... let me know if this is confusing)

I'll also echo everyone who has said that you don't want the braid or the bun to be too tight, as that is usually where deformed buns and snapped strands come from.

Okay, just checking in to say that this is WONDERFUL advice. The bun is a lot more stable and comfortable using this method that it usually is when I weave the stick through the braid. I did my braid a bit looser than usual and the bun A LOT looser than I usually make it. The stick went through it like butter and it felt very secure. I was pretty much ready to give up on sticks, so I'm pretty stoked. Now I can justify buying a few more!


I like my spin pins for some things, but I really love these "Magic Grip" pins (http://www.easycomforts.com/buy-magic-grip-hair-pins-333482&cmp=compare_shop?SourceCode=ECGOOGLESHOPPING&CAWELAID=1350248964&catargetid=320013550000001217&cadevice=c&cagpspn=pla). I think I got an off-brand kind at Walgreens or something.

Anyway, they are great and much sturdier than bobby pins or the crimped pins. I like to use them if I do a bun and parts are sticking out. I can tuck them really easily with these.

Alas, no Walgreens where I live. I'll see if I can find similar pins. I definitely want to try pins of some sort. They would have been helpful when I attempted a cameo bun last night. It held so-so with just the one stick.

walterSCAN
January 23rd, 2014, 06:17 PM
Okay, just checking in to say that this is WONDERFUL advice. The bun is a lot more stable and comfortable using this method that it usually is when I weave the stick through the braid. I did my braid a bit looser than usual and the bun A LOT looser than I usually make it. The stick went through it like butter and it felt very secure. I was pretty much ready to give up on sticks, so I'm pretty stoked. Now I can justify buying a few more!

Yay! :cheese: I'm glad I could help!