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View Full Version : How easily do cones wash away?



night owl
January 4th, 2014, 12:53 AM
Once you've decided to stop using cones, how easy or hard is it to get rid of the ones that are already in your hair? Do they wash out each time with a normal sulfate shampoo? Would they wash out if you were using a sulfate-free shampoo, say, in particular Nature's Gate Jojoba?

I'm asking because the leave-in and conditioner I used to use both contain cones. Someone recommended that with my coarse curly hair, I should try going cone-free. I haven't used any cones since I clarified with Neutrogena Anti-Residue shampoo (haven't washed again yet, and been using sweet almond oil to moisturize).

If I were to use the leave-in watered down as a detangling spray before I shampoo, would the Nature's Gate shampoo wash out the cones?

And perhaps the trickier question is--I've seen numerous times here the advice to change only one thing at a time so you know which change is or isn't working. I'm changing from my super-alkaline shampoo bar to the Nature's Gate Jojoba shampoo. Should I ditch my old conditioner and leave-in because they have cones and switch instead to the NG Jojoba conditioner? Or should I keep using the cones and only change one thing at a time?

If water makes any difference in the equation, I have a filtered showerhead.

Thanks!

lapushka
January 4th, 2014, 05:01 AM
A regular sulfate shampoo (without silicones) should wash away the silicones just fine. If you continue to use silicones in your routine, it's enough that you clarify once every so often. How often exactly is something you're going to have to experience for yourself.

sarahthegemini
January 4th, 2014, 07:06 AM
I was under the impression that sulfates or coco betaine is enough to remove silicones.

Firefox7275
January 4th, 2014, 09:48 AM
Depends on the particular silicone and level of build up, the shampoo and your washing technique. Water soluble silicones and the amino ones resist building up anyway. Heavy build up may take a few clarifying washes, light build up/ coating should come off over a period of time with pretty much any shampoo.

Clarifying shampoos are based on sulphates, cocoamidopropyl betaine or an olefin sulfonate and are non conditioning/ clear type. To clarify you should massage the lengths and ends not just let the bubbles rinse over.

night owl
January 4th, 2014, 11:32 AM
Thanks for the info!

Is there a way to know when you've washed away most or all of the cones? If you're using oils, don't they sort of replace what the cones were doing? Meaning that you might have to clarify and go without oils to see the true condition of the hair?

sarahthegemini
January 4th, 2014, 12:02 PM
Thanks for the info!

Is there a way to know when you've washed away most or all of the cones? If you're using oils, don't they sort of replace what the cones were doing? Meaning that you might have to clarify and go without oils to see the true condition of the hair?

If you want to see the 'true' condition of your hair, I recommend shampooing to remove any residue silicones and not following up with anything. Just once. That's what I'd do.

ExpectoPatronum
January 4th, 2014, 04:00 PM
I have coarse hair too, and to be honest going cone-free just made it feel coarse. It actually feels soft if I use cones. The ones in my products are mostly dimethicone, but it hasn't built up too bad. I clarify with a sulfate shampoo every now and again just to be sure.

Also, I experimented with many different oils and none of them duplicated the feel cones give my hair.

Firefox7275
January 4th, 2014, 07:51 PM
Thanks for the info!

Is there a way to know when you've washed away most or all of the cones? If you're using oils, don't they sort of replace what the cones were doing? Meaning that you might have to clarify and go without oils to see the true condition of the hair?

There are various ingredients that substitute for the properties of silicones - natural oils are one and the closest match if you want just one ingredient.

Clarified but not conditioned hair isn't necessarily the true condition since a harsh (especially anionic) shampoo can raise the cuticle and change the electrical charge, so is not the natural state of your hair. For me I feel like the closest is when I feel I dont have build up and have recently conditioner only washed to 'squeaky' clean but then left nekkid to dry.

I feel conditioner washing better respects my hair's natural pH and electrical charge. Certainly in that state my hair is shinier and way less poufy than it used to be from which I infer less damage/ better health (I still colour treat so will never be fully healthy).