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View Full Version : Chelating conditioner for cowashing



ErinLeigh
December 30th, 2013, 10:25 AM
I just noticed my suave juicy green apple and my vo5 kiwi lime conditioners contain disodium EDTA.
would cowashing with these truly chelate my hair or do I need more ingredients for that? Is the special shampoo still necessary it this this enough?
Can my chelating be done by simply cowashing? And does this clarify and chelate ?

Ms. Littlefish
December 30th, 2013, 10:31 AM
It's likely that the disodium EDTA in that quantity is just used to balance the pH of the product. If you still occasionally clarify your hair (I'm on CO and have to shampoo once in a great while) then a chelating shampoo would easily serve both purposes. If you're hoping to avoid all shampoo use you could have a shower filter installed or to go the extra mile, a water softener. I believe club soda rinses can deter the build up on certain minerals but I'm unsure if it helps with all types of mineral build up.

Firefox7275
December 30th, 2013, 10:37 AM
EDTA has more than one function, you need the right concentration to chelate plus a second chelant to hit all types of mineral. A chelating product would need to penetrate the hair which I suspect is why they are shampoos, conditioners are designed to smooth and coat the cuticle not raise it.

Clarifying is removing product build up and necessitates fairly potent surfactants (sulphates, olefin sulfonates, betaines) in a non conditioning formula (usually clear). The emollients in a conditioner would block effective clarifying. You won't damage your hair with the occasional application of shampoo - the issue is the cumulative effect over months or years.

ErinLeigh
December 30th, 2013, 08:17 PM
EDTA has more than one function, you need the right concentration to chelate plus a second chelant to hit all types of mineral. A chelating product would need to penetrate the hair which I suspect is why they are shampoos, conditioners are designed to smooth and coat the cuticle not raise it.

Clarifying is removing product build up and necessitates fairly potent surfactants (sulphates, olefin sulfonates, betaines) in a non conditioning formula (usually clear). The emollients in a conditioner would block effective clarifying. You won't damage your hair with the occasional application of shampoo - the issue is the cumulative effect over months or years.

Thank you both. That is exactly what I wanted to know.
Not oppsoed to shampoo at all. Just wondered if those were doing it.
An answer was definitely helpful :)