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View Full Version : Leaving a deep cone free conditioner with honey for a couple of hours?



lole18
December 21st, 2013, 04:48 AM
Is it ok to leave the mixture for a couple of hours or under a hooded dryer? i'm using the body shop rainforest moisture butter (it's a deep conditioner not an actual butter) lol its cone free

Lyv
December 21st, 2013, 04:51 AM
Yep it's fine. I put honey in my deep conditioner all the time or do an SMT and leave it in usually 2+ hours.

lole18
December 21st, 2013, 05:00 AM
Yep it's fine. I put honey in my deep conditioner all the time or do an SMT and leave it in usually 2+ hours.

at what ratio do you use it? i read that there's a different ratio if you want to moisturize or lighten the hair! i want both though so i don't know what ratio to use :(

Lyv
December 21st, 2013, 05:09 AM
I don't measure it out exactly but I use about 1/2 cup conditioner and 1/2-2 tablespoons of honey. Honey doesn't lighten my hair no matter how much I use so I don't know what ratio you should use for that. I wouldn't use heat on it though it'll stop the honey from lightening.

Lyv
December 21st, 2013, 05:12 AM
http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=148&highlight=honey

This is the thread for honey lightening, it'll probably have some good tips!

Firefox7275
December 21st, 2013, 05:31 AM
Is it ok to leave the mixture for a couple of hours or under a hooded dryer? i'm using the body shop rainforest moisture butter (it's a deep conditioner not an actual butter) lol its cone free

Depends what the ingredients are and what you are looking for. The major emollients (fatty alcohols, cationic surfactants) will have deposited to saturation long before a couple of hours. Are there any proven penetrating ingredients in your concoction and are they water miscible? Penetrating oils and butters should be used on dry hair since oil and water do not mix.

You may achieve increased softness with long conditioning times, but this can be down to breaking of structural protein bonds and weakening of the hair so may not be desirable. There is an excellent series of science based articles on deep conditioning on the Natural Haven blog.

If you are looking for lightening I can't see why you'd dilute down the peroxide and possibly block the effects with occlusives/ barriers (oils and butters), use the honey neat or in a water based mix.

RancheroTheBee
December 21st, 2013, 09:18 AM
*snip*

You may achieve increased softness with long conditioning times, but this can be down to breaking of structural protein bonds and weakening of the hair so may not be desirable. There is an excellent series of science based articles on deep conditioning on the Natural Haven blog.

*snip*

I was just reading an article about this on a forum for curlies. I used to deep-condition a lot when I was younger and noticed the "softness" (which I think people also refer to as 'mushy' hair) and got a lot of breakage after a while. The 'cone-free status wouldn't necessarily make a huge difference unless you're specifically avoiding them, but unless you've dried out your hair significantly, I never see the point of extended conditioning sessions.

meteor
December 21st, 2013, 12:59 PM
I absolutely agree with Firefox7275 and RancheroTheBee.

Oil-based treatments (e.g. oil mixtures, infused oils) do take hours to penetrate and are safe to leave in on dry hair to patch-repair and add elasticity.

Water-based conditioning treatments inadvertently add to the risk of hydral fatigue. If you want a heavy protein treatment, leaving it on for a while can help even more protein to adsorb, but protein overload is also likely to make hair tangly and dry-feeling. Other ingredients take only minutes to take usually. Anything longer than 30 min at body temperature is likely to give diminishing returns at increasing risk of hydral fatigue.
Good read on this: http://www.thenaturalhavenbloom.com/2012/10/deep-conditioning-effect-of-time-and.html

Also, check out this article on proven penetrating conditioning ingredients with the amounts of time needed for each: http://www.thenaturalhavenbloom.com/2012/10/deep-conditioning-what-ingredients-in.html