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ErinLeigh
December 15th, 2013, 10:10 AM
Can you be over moisturized and still fail the snap test?
My hair snaps when pulled apart with no stretch.

I have read that over moisturized hair will break off easily and will appear soft and limp.
I am considering some protein just in case but I wonder if it is possible to have too little protein if hair still fails the snap test.

I get so confused with the fact protein treatments prevent breakage...yet the snap test tells me I need moisture to prevent breakage. Help!

jeanniet
December 15th, 2013, 10:56 AM
I've never even done the snap test, so can't answer your question in that regard, but in general, it's better to know your hair properties and likes/dislikes. Porous hair (typically hair that has been bleached or heat damaged is porous), fine hair, and curly hair often do well with protein. My hair is fine and curly, and I can use a lot of protein on it, but use a lot of moisture, too. I'm not sure what "mushy" hair feels like. I just go by what I think it needs at any given time. But it's possible to need protein and moisture at the same time.

kganihanova
December 15th, 2013, 02:06 PM
Can you be over moisturized and still fail the snap test?
My hair snaps when pulled apart with no stretch.

I have read that over moisturized hair will break off easily and will appear soft and limp.
I am considering some protein just in case but I wonder if it is possible to have too little protein if hair still fails the snap test.

I get so confused with the fact protein treatments prevent breakage...yet the snap test tells me I need moisture to prevent breakage. Help!

What's the snap test?

meteor
December 15th, 2013, 02:27 PM
Snap test: stretch a hair, and if it breaks immediately, you need more moisture and emolliency (oils). If it stretches a lot and doesn't go back to initial structure when you let go of the hair, you need more protein.


ErinLeigh, I think you need to go by the feel of your hair. If your hair feels lank, greasy, not bouncy at all - you probably over-oiled, over-conditioned, and some clarifying and/or protein can help improve the condition.
If it feels really dry, brittle, matted, no shine, can't get a comb through hair, it needs emolliency and moisture.
Either way, it's good to start off with a nice clarifying wash to "reset" things and identify the problem.

Maktub
December 15th, 2013, 02:30 PM
Has your hair been damaged ? (previous bleach, iron, etc.)

Firefox7275
December 16th, 2013, 12:20 AM
Snap test is for elasticity which does not demonstrate water (= moisture) levels in hair AFAIK.

ErinLeigh
December 16th, 2013, 06:29 AM
yes hair was damaged from a keratin treatment in mid Oct which is why I have been shying away from protein for a while. I just wonder if I have gone too far one way. Not mushy hair for sure. looks and feels ok now. But cant figure out why im still snapping even though texture has improved
mind boggled

Maktub
December 16th, 2013, 07:48 AM
yes hair was damaged from a keratin treatment in mid Oct which is why I have been shying away from protein for a while. I just wonder if I have gone too far one way. Not mushy hair for sure. looks and feels ok now. But cant figure out why im still snapping even though texture has improved
mind boggled


Such treatments actually change permanently the internal hair structure. My bet is that your damaged hair can be protected in many ways so that it breaks off as little as possible, but it cannot be repared. It will keep snapping, as it has lost it's elasticity permanently.

Your new growing hair will be ok and with normal elasticity, most probably if you are healthy. But the curent hair can't.

Sorry for the bad news. Lots of us came here with such damaged hair that we had to be patient ... for it to grow out and be slowly (or drastically) cut off / trimmed off.

Maktub
December 16th, 2013, 07:54 AM
Maybe someone else can link to it (Can't seem to find it) but there is an article here that shows what different treatments / chemicals / hair tools do to hair on a microscopic level. Very interesting and eye opening. (with photos)

I remember how the iron sort of melted the interior hair cortex...

Anyone knows what I'm refering to ?

freesia
December 16th, 2013, 10:43 AM
Maybe someone else can link to it (Can't seem to find it) but there is an article here that shows what different treatments / chemicals / hair tools do to hair on a microscopic level. Very interesting and eye opening. (with photos)

I remember how the iron sort of melted the interior hair cortex...

Anyone knows what I'm refering to ?

I found a relevant, old thread : hair damage through a microscope (http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=47891)

ETA: There's the article ! Damaged Hair: Understanding, Preventing & Rehabilitating (http://web.archive.org/web/20120125071723/http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/vbjournal.php?do=article&articleid=79). A great thanks to Nightshade :o, this is very interesting indeed !

ErinLeigh
December 16th, 2013, 11:57 AM
thanks guys. also kind of relieving to know there isn't much I can do but grow it out. I can stop trying so hard now. Will obviously care for it, but wont need obsessive product reviews and google searches on moisture, protein, balancing hair, sealing, SLS, non sls, cones, no cones, low poo, no poo, co washing, water wash, vinegar rinse, catnip tea, citric acid rinse, oils, mineral oil, clarifying, wet hair, dry hair, air dry, heat dry, up, down, combing, brushing, finger detangling, cassia, henna, herbals, hydral fatigue, yada yada yada. :)

ErinLeigh
December 16th, 2013, 11:59 AM
madora thank you for the links. ktani articles and nightshades both interest me :)
i dont know how you find them. my internal search never works

Firefox7275
December 16th, 2013, 01:01 PM
yes hair was damaged from a keratin treatment in mid Oct which is why I have been shying away from protein for a while. I just wonder if I have gone too far one way. Not mushy hair for sure. looks and feels ok now. But cant figure out why im still snapping even though texture has improved
mind boggled

It is the heat that damaged your hair not the protein, that damage is permanent since hair is dead. You might have a hair analysis from Goosefootprints on Etsy to see where you are at.

Proven beneficial ingredients for damaged hair include coconut oil, hydrolysed protein, ceramides, 18-MEA and panthenol - these can penetrate and/ or patch repair (temporary). Science based haircare information is on the Natural Haven blog, Sciencey Hairblog and the 'curl chemist' articles by Tonya McKay on Naturallycurly. Ktani's research is patchy/ poor quality.

heidi w.
December 16th, 2013, 01:08 PM
Simply oil the length, from about the end of the earlobes on down. Allow the hair near the scalp to be moisturized by sebum. I have no idea what you're really doing. But I know that once I understand, I can fix it.
heidi w.

meteor
December 16th, 2013, 01:14 PM
Proven beneficial ingredients for damaged hair include coconut oil, hydrolysed protein, ceramides, 18-MEA and panthenol - these can penetrate and/ or patch repair (temporary).

Great response. And while we are on the subject of penetrative/patching conditioning agents, I wanted to post a link to an excellent article on this: http://www.thenaturalhavenbloom.com/2012/10/deep-conditioning-what-ingredients-in.html
(Disclaimer: just because something is not yet researched, doesn't mean it doesn't penetrate, but the items listed in the article have at least some (if not always great) published research to support it. )

"Natural Hair - No Processing
-water
-hydrolysed wheat protein
-coconut oil
-cetrimonium bromide
-caffeine
-panthenol

Bleached Hair, Relaxed Hair or Damaged Hair (i.e cuticle damage)
- everything in the unprocessed natural hair list above
-some amino acids enhanced by being in a creamy conditioner (arginine, glycine, glutamic acid, phenylalanine, histidine)
-artificial peptides (similar to hydrolysed protein)
-some silicones or amodimethicones (Trimethylsilylamodimethicone)
-hydrolysed palm oil
-18MEA"

jeanniet
December 16th, 2013, 01:32 PM
Yes, it's the heat that's the problem, not the keratin itself. I would just treat your hair as heat-damaged and follow Firefox's suggestions. In other words, you really may need to do regular protein treatments to help prevent the breakage until you can grow it out. Then follow with a DT. But ultimately, yep, you'll have to grow it out.

sourgrl
December 16th, 2013, 01:41 PM
I don't have anything to add regarding your moisture question.

But, when I want to search the site I enter the following in google: site:longhaircommunity.com too much moisture