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kganihanova
November 11th, 2013, 07:14 PM
Hi all! I have a question that needs to answered. I've heard from various youtubers that protein treatments are essential to retaining length. I used to do egg treatments about once a month and used to henna (will stop because of monster sheds) and it never really did much. My hair was stronger for a little bit but otherwise, nothing. I'm a wavy and cut out most of my split with s and d. I also do a weekly coconut oil deep condition and use coconut oil as a curl definer/leave in. Do I actually need protein or is that all bs?

florenonite
November 12th, 2013, 04:49 AM
I don't think it's necessary. I've never, in my life, done a protein treatment, and have never felt the need to.

That's not to say they're not beneficial, but that it depends on individual hair needs. If your hair needs protein, give it protein; if it doesn't, don't.

XcaliburGirl
November 12th, 2013, 06:06 AM
I think it definitely depends on the hair characteristics. If protein didn't seem to make a difference, then you probably don't need it.

On the other hand, if you find your hair is breaking a lot but doesn't need moisture, then give it a try again.

I don't do protein treatments, but my hair seems to do well with a little protein in my conditioner.

UP Lisa
November 12th, 2013, 08:53 AM
The think protein treatments are most needed for damaged hair to fill in the "holes" in the hair strands.

DweamGoiL
November 12th, 2013, 09:22 AM
I don't think protein is for damaged hair exclusively. It's just some people's hair is more responsive to protein and others are not; just like some oils work great for some, but don't work at all for others. My hair is not damaged and has ALWAYS loved protein. Twice a month and sometimes more, I use reconstructors with protein in them. I don't do all protein treatments per se, but my hair does love to have its share of protein. With protein, it does seem to be a trial and wait and see kind of thing.

ExpectoPatronum
November 12th, 2013, 01:13 PM
My hair hates protein. Even a little bit in shampoo and conditioner is enough to make my hair feel like straw. As everyone says, it depends on an individual's hair. Some love protein, some don't.

UP Lisa
November 12th, 2013, 01:14 PM
Do you condition after the protein treatments? I've read that you need to do that.

Crumpet
November 12th, 2013, 01:55 PM
I'm doing a protein treatment today -- I usually follow with an SMT since they do dry hair out. My hair ends up feeling amazing. It feels more substantial somehow. I like them, but I've only started doing them recently so I don't know how they work long term.

Jennielee88
November 12th, 2013, 01:59 PM
My hair likes certain proteins but a few weeks ago I used ORS hair mayo because my hair was getting kind of spongey and stretchy like it was over moisturised so I tried to balance it with some protein. Anyway my hair was gross afterwards, kind of sticky and stiff at the same time. I rinse my hair for a while after I wash so it's not that I didn't rinse it out properly, it just didn't agree with me!

Temme
November 12th, 2013, 02:16 PM
Protein treatments certainly aren't essential to retaining length for everyone. Although healthy hair can benefit from protein, I think it's more important for people with damage. And since Youtubers (not all of them) tend to do more damaging things to their hair than LHCers, protein may be more important for them. I've never done a protein treatment, but I sometimes use a regular conditioner that has protein in it. I've never actual felt that my hair needed protein though. Saying that protein treatments are essential is too generalized. You have to see what works for you.

goldcopperbrown
November 12th, 2013, 02:18 PM
Hi all! I have a question that needs to answered. I've heard from various youtubers that protein treatments are essential to retaining length. I used to do egg treatments about once a month and used to henna (will stop because of monster sheds) and it never really did much. My hair was stronger for a little bit but otherwise, nothing. I'm a wavy and cut out most of my split with s and d. I also do a weekly coconut oil deep condition and use coconut oil as a curl definer/leave in. Do I actually need protein or is that all bs?


Different schools of thought- a lot of people here avoid protein because too much protein can actually make your hair brittle. Generally, I know I need more protein when my hair feels weak, and like bubble gum (it's a distinct feeling). I don't need it now that I've stopped bleaching my hair, but I will maybe do a protein treatment very occasionally. It's not the kind of thing you need every week.

Temme
November 12th, 2013, 02:20 PM
Oh, I wanted to add that the reason you didn't see much of a difference with protein treatments may be the whole egg thing. Apparently some people think that egg protein molecules are too large to penetrate the hair shaft or something like that. Maybe someone else who understands it can chime in. But if that's true, that may be why it didn't do much.

Madora
November 12th, 2013, 04:57 PM
If you get enough protein through your diet, your hair shouldn't require protein treatments.

jeanniet
November 12th, 2013, 05:08 PM
Porous hair, fine hair, and (sometimes) curly hair tends to respond best to protein. It's true, though, that the molecules in egg protein are too large. Hydrolyzed proteins are smaller--gelatin treatments (external, not internal), for example.

My hair responds very well to protein, and lots of it. It makes my curls tighter and bouncier. I usually use either a gelatin treatment, or spray on Colorful neutral protein filler before conditioner, then rinse it out after several minutes. I do have a good diet, btw, and get plenty of protein. External application of protein is something different from internal.

Firefox7275
November 14th, 2013, 04:07 AM
Hi all! I have a question that needs to answered. I've heard from various youtubers that protein treatments are essential to retaining length. I used to do egg treatments about once a month and used to henna (will stop because of monster sheds) and it never really did much. My hair was stronger for a little bit but otherwise, nothing. I'm a wavy and cut out most of my split with s and d. I also do a weekly coconut oil deep condition and use coconut oil as a curl definer/leave in. Do I actually need protein or is that all bs?

Depends on your hair properties, fine or damaged hair tends to do well with some hydrolysed protein, coarse hair not so much. You might find your older ends like a little protein, your healthier roots don't. Egg is NOT a protein treatment the proteins are far too large to penetrate: if it does anything that is down to the lipid (fat) content and/ or emulsifying effect.

ErinLeigh
November 14th, 2013, 08:05 AM
Doesn't henna act like a protein in the way that it fills the strands? If you henna maybe you don't need it as often. What is happening with your hair to make you eonder if you need it? Just reading general comments, or is hair snapping or stretching?

Treble Bolt
November 14th, 2013, 09:53 AM
I don't understand why you put protein ON your hair/scalp.....It will just get sweated out and not be completely absorbed into your hair. It makes LOADS more sense to eat more protein, and get the proper amino acids your body needs to give your strong nails and hair. Then the protein will be 100% used when your body is 'doing it's work'. Your body and hair are more affected by what you eat in terms of growth, not what you put onto what's already dead.....

florenonite
November 14th, 2013, 11:04 AM
I don't understand why you put protein ON your hair/scalp.....It will just get sweated out and not be completely absorbed into your hair. It makes LOADS more sense to eat more protein, and get the proper amino acids your body needs to give your strong nails and hair. Then the protein will be 100% used when your body is 'doing it's work'. Your body and hair are more affected by what you eat in terms of growth, not what you put onto what's already dead.....

The reason for putting protein on your hair is *because* it's already dead; eating more protein isn't going to improve the quality of the hair that's already there.

So, yes, if your hair is needing protein (and damage isn't the obvious culprit) then, yes, by all means you should look at your protein intake and see if it's within a healthy range. But it won't fix the hair that's already there.

Treble Bolt
November 14th, 2013, 11:22 AM
Oh, I did not know that. I mean I know adding different things to your hair can help inprove (or further damage it), but I guess I am just too old fashioned when to hair care (I don't really do anything with it). Of course I still have so much to learn as well :p

HintOfMint
November 14th, 2013, 12:12 PM
I've found that really fine hair, or color-treated (bleached) hair benefits the most from protein, but other than those cases, it's hit-or-miss. My hair benefits the most from a completely protein-free routine. It's hard because my favorite smelling conditioners tend to have small amounts of it. It doesn't destroy my hair, but my hair feels incredible when it's completely gone from my products.

kganihanova
November 16th, 2013, 01:01 PM
update: tried some protein conditioner, it wasn't a good situation. I guess my hair doesn't exactly love protein. Re:henna, it makes me shed A LOT, like a disconcerting amount so I think I want to stop that because my thickness is starting to get affected and it pulls out my curls. I wish it would work for me but.....I don't think its happening.

Buddaphlyy
November 16th, 2013, 02:30 PM
Porous hair, fine hair, and (sometimes) curly hair tends to respond best to protein. It's true, though, that the molecules in egg protein are too large. Hydrolyzed proteins are smaller--gelatin treatments (external, not internal), for example.

My hair responds very well to protein, and lots of it. It makes my curls tighter and bouncier. I usually use either a gelatin treatment, or spray on Colorful neutral protein filler before conditioner, then rinse it out after several minutes. I do have a good diet, btw, and get plenty of protein. External application of protein is something different from internal.


This has been my experience as well. I would also add hair that has had chemical treatments as well.

Most of my product staples are protein based and I know exactly when to use them. I think this trips a lot of people up as well. Just because you are experiencing breakage doesn't mean you pull out the big gun protein treatment. You might just need a protein based leave-in every other day for a week to get your hair in order.