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LauraLongLocks
November 4th, 2013, 08:58 AM
...when you are waiting for it to dry, but need to keep it protected while you go about your day? I have been leaving it down while it dries, but I have livestock and young children to care for, and really need it out of the way and protected while I'm working outdoors, or caring for little people. It takes about an hour for my hair to be damp-dry, where I am almost willing to put it up, but I can't sit around for an hour or more and do nothing. I have been thinking of putting my hair dryer on the coolest setting and carefully blowing it dry so that I can get on with my day. I've tried washing at night, but then I wake up with hair that is still wet, because I put it in a satin slumber cap at night and it doesn't dry out.

Kherome
November 4th, 2013, 09:04 AM
I put it up in a bun and let it be.

Bagginslover
November 4th, 2013, 09:05 AM
Can you wash first thing, before you do anything else (eat, get kids up etc?), that way it'd get maximum drying time before you need to put it up. Thats what I try to do, I then take it down again if I have half an hour where I'm not doing much (so sitting down to eat lunch perhaps) to let it dry further, then put it back up again to carry on.

DweamGoiL
November 4th, 2013, 09:10 AM
For me, it depends on what I am doing. If I am staying home, I just put it up half up half down so the front gets lift and I gel it to set it as curly as possible while it's air drying. If I have to go outdoors, particularly now in the cold, I will just wash the night before and pineapple it if I want to wear it wavy for the nex day and if I want to wear it straight, I will bun it loosely while it's damp but closer to dry and sleep on it :)

jacqueline101
November 4th, 2013, 09:31 AM
I don't have kids but I do wear my turbie towel after I've detangled my brother wants to play stylist. I leave it on until I'm alone in the bathroom I quickly detangle, spray on my shine spray, syle and call it good.

trolleypup
November 4th, 2013, 09:28 PM
Drip everywhere. Puddles. That is when I run out of time and don't have time for the microfiber turban thing for 15 minutes to get most of the water out. *shrug*

Madora
November 4th, 2013, 11:28 PM
I can't stand wet hair. Years ago I developed my own method for natural air drying. Works like a charm and only takes half an hour indoors...even less if outdoors with temps in the 70s.

LauraLongLocks
November 4th, 2013, 11:44 PM
I can't stand wet hair. Years ago I developed my own method for natural air drying. Works like a charm and only takes half an hour indoors...even less if outdoors with temps in the 70s.

Do tell! My hair can't handle much manipulation when wet, and my life is too active to allow it to stay down.

Madora
November 4th, 2013, 11:58 PM
Do tell! My hair can't handle much manipulation when wet, and my life is too active to allow it to stay down.

Here you go, LauraLongLocks: please scroll down to post # 19
http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=116779&page=2

Thanks! Any questions, please let me know!

Shibe
November 4th, 2013, 11:58 PM
Mine air dries fairly quickly, so I give it about 10 minutes, 'fluff' the roots with my fingertips, and comb gently once its 90% dry. Then its off to a pony tail or braid for me!

Lyv
November 5th, 2013, 12:06 AM
Mine takes a few hours to air dry so I usually put it up in a t-shirt for a while and then braid it if I washed in the morning. If I wash it at night I take it out of the t-shirt and drape it over my pillow while I sleep.

kme81
November 5th, 2013, 12:33 AM
I wash it at night and lay it over my pillow to dry as I sleep. :)

caromarpie
November 5th, 2013, 12:34 AM
Here you go, LauraLongLocks: please scroll down to post # 19
http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=116779&page=2

Thanks! Any questions, please let me know!
Thanks for this I will try that tomorrow

Stray_mind
November 5th, 2013, 02:02 AM
I put it in a towel turbie to soak up the water. I keep it like that a few minutes and then i keep it loose and let it air dry. It takes about 2 to 3 hours for them to fully dry.

Ambystoma
November 5th, 2013, 02:13 AM
MIne takes hours to dry so when it needs to be out of the way while wet I very gently pop it in a low loose bun for a while, and then take it out again for as long as I can.

Hybris
November 5th, 2013, 02:52 AM
I wrap it in a towel turban and let it be for a while. Then I re-wrap it on the other side of the towel that is still more-less dry. Then when the first towel is completely wet, I take another towel and do the same thing again. By the time both towels are wet, the hair is only slightly wet. Then I entangle it, put on my hair ends serum (DM's Alverde brand, best thing ever for dry hair ends) and any oil(s) I'm using (olive ATM, but only because it's the cheapest and my hair eats away a lot of oil. Oil actually helps a bit with the drying. I have a LOT of hair and it takes ages to dry. It's one of the reasons I wash it only once a week on average. :D
After the hair is oiled, I brush it to get the oil to every part of the hair. It's usually still more then just damp at this point. If I have to go out or if it's a bit chilly (or if I have a cold and I have those a lot) I might blow dry it a bit. Now here's the trick... Never use the full heat setting when blow drying. When I do it, I keep my finger on the cool air setting about 90% of the time. You let the blow drier warm up a bit but don't allow it to heat up all the way. It actually dries my hair a bit faster that way and it doesn't damage it.
If I'm not blow drying it, I usually end up with having to braid it while still damp because it's time for bed (I usually wash my hair in the afternoon/evening). And quite often, it's still damp after I wake up. :( I guess having thinner hair does have it's advantages. :P

farmlass
November 5th, 2013, 03:18 AM
I would just gently bun (so it stays put but isn't too twisted and tight) while you have to work, then if you get a chance to sit with your feet up (I know, not likely!) let it down then to air dry. I usually wash before bed and then braid it, and it's usually still a bit damp in the morning, so if you want it completely dry you are best giving a little time loose.

freesia
November 5th, 2013, 05:55 AM
After the towel has absorbed most of the water, I do the headbanging trick :p (gently and not intensely, otherwise it gives me a headache) separating the hair into smaller strands which dry faster.
Sometimes, when I have things to do right after, I put them into a simple french braid or english braid with a paranda, because I prefer to tie an elastic around the ends (which usually dry extremely quickly) or not at all.

XcaliburGirl
November 5th, 2013, 06:25 AM
I have mine in a microfiber TurbieTwist for about 15 minutes. Then I put iit in a bun. When I take it down in the evening, it finishes drying.

Wet/damp buns come out much neater and smoother.

verenikiscoma
November 5th, 2013, 07:07 AM
I twist it up with a turbie for a bit, to soak up the majority of water then I let it air dry for 20 minutes or so before braiding it very loosely.

LauraLongLocks
November 5th, 2013, 12:48 PM
Thank you, Madora, for including those instructions. I have copied and pasted them here for everyone.

1) Using my palms, squeeze excess water out of my hair and gently detangle with wide tooth comb.
2) Take towel and place it vertically so it covers my head, and wrap length of towel around hanging hair (all my hair is in front of me)
3) Take palms and press them along length of towelled hair.

4) Remove towel, part hair in center part so there are 2 sections. Clip one section aside out of the way (it just hangs - not attached to my head).

5) Take other section of hair, detangle gently again.

6) Then I begin to "fan" the strands...my theory being that hair dries faster when the air circulates through it constantly.

To "fan the strands" take a SMALL portion of hair in your hand, bring your hand up to your eyebrow THEN EXTEND YOUR HAND OUT IN FRONT OF YOU, then release the hair and let it drift to the floor.

Take the next piece of hair and repeat. Keep repeating the motions until all the hair is "fanned".

Special note: After "fanning" each section I usually comb it out after it has fallen down...I do it SLOWLY but you can omit this step if you want.

After one side has been completely "fanned", braid it gently (if desired) or clip it to keep it separate from the other side. Repeat the procedure with the other side of the hair until it too has been completely "fanned".

Style as desired. I do not use any products, sprays/gels/mousse or oils on my hair when fanning..or afterwards.

In wintertime:

I have a small portable electric heater in my bathroom that has 3 adjustable temps. I turn on the lowest temp and then stand about 3 feet away from the heater and perform my "fanning" technique. Works very well though the hair might seem a little "frisky" afterwards (because of the heat). I usually just run my hands down my hair and that helps tame the friskiness.

Bottom line: the success of the air drying depends on: how much water you can get rid of after final rinse, and how much time you spend on the "fanning" process.

Years ago, before I developed this method, I went thru the whole "towel on the head...hair in a towel down my back...wet and heavy...yuck" syndrome. I hated it...waiting around forever for my very thick hair to dry....so I experimented and found the solution that worked for me.

Fanning the strands is easy to do and as long as you're willing to take your time, it really shrinks the air drying time to a manageable degree.

By the way, my hair is slightly wavy and thick (back then). I wouldn't recommend "fanning" the strands to those with really curly hair, as they need to be extra careful when dealing with those curls.

Hope this helps! I've been air drying my hair like this for more than 40 years.

LauraLongLocks
November 5th, 2013, 12:49 PM
I'm going to try your fanning technique after my next wash. I hate having wet hair all the time!

Madora
November 5th, 2013, 01:15 PM
I'd love to know if it worked for you, LauraLongLocks! I hate wet hair, plus the time wasted getting it dried. I didn't (and don't) believe in artificial heat so came up with my "fanning the strands" procedure.

LauraLongLocks
November 6th, 2013, 04:12 PM
Hi Madora, I wanted to tell you I used your technique this morning, and it worked very well. My hair was dry enough that I was able to put it up before going outside to care for livestock in the wind and cold. Thank you!

Madora
November 6th, 2013, 04:33 PM
Hi Madora, I wanted to tell you I used your technique this morning, and it worked very well. My hair was dry enough that I was able to put it up before going outside to care for livestock in the wind and cold. Thank you!

Thanks for letting me know, LauraLongLocks! Glad it helped you!

livelycurls
November 6th, 2013, 04:35 PM
I read the technique to fan the hair, but i still don't understand how to "fan" the hair. Is there any videos for this?

Madora
November 6th, 2013, 08:15 PM
I read the technique to fan the hair, but i still don't understand how to "fan" the hair. Is there any videos for this?

Sorry, livelycurls, I don't have a video camera.

"Fanning the strands" is simply a matter of letting the strands slip through your fingers (as you're holding them in your hand (which is held up in front of you, as described above).

Ideally, you are holding a small amount of damp hair in your hand. You then just let a few pieces of that hair slip through your fingers...bit by bit..and let them fall down.

You keep repeating the "fanning" on one side of the hair...section by section...over and over and over...until the hair is dry. Repeat the fanning over and over and over with the remaining hair on the other side.

Personally, I always comb out each piece that falls to get even more air get through the hair (the tines of the comb are great for that)...but if you don't feel comfortable using a comb after each "fanning" then just continue to the next section and "fan" away.

The success of "fanning the strands" is based on two concepts: getting the excess water out of your hair (via a towel..i.e. pressing out the water with your palms) and keeping the air flowing through the strands as you "fan" them.

Also, I usually do this outdoors..temps ranging from 65 to 72 degrees farenheit.

LauraLongLocks
November 6th, 2013, 09:32 PM
My blow dryer happens to have a cool setting (no heat), with a low speed blower on it, so I did the hair strand fanning with aid of my blow dryer on cool, low speed. Worked very fast, and without any heat. I'm hooked!

Madora
November 7th, 2013, 09:12 AM
My blow dryer happens to have a cool setting (no heat), with a low speed blower on it, so I did the hair strand fanning with aid of my blow dryer on cool, low speed. Worked very fast, and without any heat. I'm hooked!

Sounds like you've got a plan, LauraLongLocks! Good for you!

Agnes Hannah
November 7th, 2013, 10:12 AM
OOHH I've done this! Didnt realise what it was just thought it was a good way of drying hair!! In fact, I thought I might be damaging it, so stopped, glad to know it is a good way and wont damage my hair after all!! Silly me!!

nobeltonya
November 7th, 2013, 03:45 PM
If I let mine air dry, it feels and looks totally different [both while it's wet, stringy and thin, and after it dries].. it turns out the best if I either bun or braid it for a few hours [2-3] while it's wet.. :disco:

Foxylocks
November 7th, 2013, 05:38 PM
I braid my soaking wet hair and leave it there the whole day.

vanillabones
November 7th, 2013, 06:57 PM
I spray on some kid's detangler, comb it out with a wooden comb and let it air dry. I like to push the hair on/around the scalp while it dries so it doesn't look so flat.

Long_hair_bear
November 7th, 2013, 07:07 PM
I just put it in a braid then put said braid down my shirt or hoodie. :)

Khristopher
November 7th, 2013, 08:16 PM
After the towel has absorbed most of the water, I do the headbanging trick :p (gently and not intensely, otherwise it gives me a headache) separating the hair into smaller strands which dry faster.
Sometimes, when I have things to do right after, I put them into a simple french braid or english braid with a paranda, because I prefer to tie an elastic around the ends (which usually dry extremely quickly) or not at all.
I do the headbang too LOL it helps a lot to get my hair dry faster! Otherwise it needs at least 2 hours to dry and I hate wet hair.

Phlegmatic
November 7th, 2013, 09:10 PM
I just allow it to air dry. At my length (waist at 5'0"), it takes about 2.5 hours to fully dry and I generally just wear it loose for the day (which I know is not the most protective, but I enjoy swishing my hair around). Occasionally, I will twist my hair back, and then put it into two rope braids. This often leaves me with very pretty waves the next day.