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View Full Version : Thinking about using silicones while trying to grow out hair.



lovinglocks
October 7th, 2013, 01:01 PM
I'm SO TIRED of my hair right now. It's damaged, it's tangled, and I'm tired of babying it and getting nowhere. My hair is very fine, and I used to dye it and when it was short I would straighten it. Now it's past bsl, I don't use heat, I've cut off almost all the dyed parts, I BABY it to no end. I don't use sulphates, I don't use silicones, I generally try to use products in it that are as natural as possible. But I was thinking... If, while I'm trying to let my hair grow out, I experiment with silicones. I know they just mask the damage, but I would almost prefer that as opposed to seeing split ends whenever I trim, and then once my hair is longer, give it a good chop. I'm also so tired of my hair being such a tangled mess. I can comb my hair through, and after a minute, I can run my hand through and I'm stuck in it.

So, I guess if I decided to do this, I would have to get a shampoo with sulphates to help prevent build up of the silicones?

Sorry this post is a little messy, I'm at work and shouldn't on here haha, but I'm thinking some may have to be in order when I get off.

Is this a good idea? What are some good shampoos/conditioners to use? Any advice or input on the matter would be appreciated.

breezefaerie
October 7th, 2013, 01:05 PM
Nothing wrong with silicones.
Depending on the type of cone, some are water soluble and are less likely to build up. I'm sure someone will be along shortly to give us a list of cones and their effect on hair.

jillosity
October 7th, 2013, 01:12 PM
I have quite fine hair too, and I have good luck using a balm made of shea butter and coconut oil on my hair when it's wet. I use just a small amount and do a little bit of finger combing to distribute, my hair is soft and shiny after it's dry, basically just like it is when I've used cones, but my hair feels a little heavier. Coconut oil by itself doesn't work, neither does shea by itself, and my hair has to be wet too, but it works. For reference, the ends of my hair are the parts that got bleached twice last year, plus a ton of other harsh treatments. This stuff might be too much for hair in better condition.

That said, I do occasionally use a serum, and I usually wish that I'd used my balm. It works even when I use a clarifying shampoo, and it works extra good when I co-wash. My hair is completely different when I co-wash too, smoother, thicker feeling, it's like a different head of hair! You might try that, although most of the conditioners generally used aren't very "natural"

hannabiss
October 7th, 2013, 01:23 PM
It's fine to use what makes your hair look and feel happy. I understand the mini pressures on here to follow every hair care habit. But there are people here with long lovely hair who have in fact used silicones every inch of the way. It has always been my favorite for detangling. Others may not agree but remember it's your hair do what you feel is best.

Panth
October 7th, 2013, 01:31 PM
So what if silicones mask damage? That's only a problem if you ignore how much damage you're causing until it is no longer able to be masked (e.g. by incessant flat ironing). It's not a problem if you're transitioning away from a damaging routine and don't want to do a big chop. It's also not a problem if the damage is just routine, unavoidable stuff.

Do what makes you and your hair happy, manageable and attractive to you - not what some "super natural" trend dictates. If that's silicones, so be it.

If you're worried about having to use the harsher sulphate cleansers because you use silicones - don't. You can either use cocamidopropyl betaine (a sulphate-free cleanser) which is capable of removing cones, or you could use cones which are water-soluble or resist building up, e.g. PEG-cones, amino-cones.

muddblood21
October 7th, 2013, 01:37 PM
I am still a newbie, so anyone can feel free to correct me if this won't work for the OP, but CO washing has really helped tame my tangles and improve the overall condition of my hair. You might look into it! Bonus, since I use the Vo5 conditioner to CO wash, it is SO much cheaper than the sulfate-free shampoo I was using! Much luck finding what works best for you! ;)

Leeloo
October 7th, 2013, 02:22 PM
I'm SO TIRED of my hair right now. It's damaged, it's tangled, and I'm tired of babying it and getting nowhere. My hair is very fine, and I used to dye it and when it was short I would straighten it. Now it's past bsl, I don't use heat, I've cut off almost all the dyed parts, I BABY it to no end. I don't use sulphates, I don't use silicones, I generally try to use products in it that are as natural as possible. But I was thinking... If, while I'm trying to let my hair grow out, I experiment with silicones. I know they just mask the damage, but I would almost prefer that as opposed to seeing split ends whenever I trim, and then once my hair is longer, give it a good chop. I'm also so tired of my hair being such a tangled mess. I can comb my hair through, and after a minute, I can run my hand through and I'm stuck in it.

So, I guess if I decided to do this, I would have to get a shampoo with sulphates to help prevent build up of the silicones?

Sorry this post is a little messy, I'm at work and shouldn't on here haha, but I'm thinking some may have to be in order when I get off.

Is this a good idea? What are some good shampoos/conditioners to use? Any advice or input on the matter would be appreciated.

Iím not sure, youíll have to try and see if your hair likes cones. The only thing I was going to suggest is start doing S&Ding (if you havenít already).

spidermom
October 7th, 2013, 02:25 PM
No problem. Silicone products solve a variety of hair ills, and a lot of the evil I see attributed to cones around here is nonsense as far as my hair is concerned.

KittyBird
October 7th, 2013, 02:30 PM
Nothing wrong with using silicones! Amodimethicone and dimethicone work really well for my hair. I use a coney leave-in conditioner after every wash (I use shampoo bars), and I have no issues with build-up. The cones make my hair super silky and easy to detangle. :D

BrightEyes
October 7th, 2013, 02:36 PM
Cones can be a good thing. I really don't get why they are so looked down upon here. I tried going cone-free once, but my hair became dry, tangled and more prone to splits and breakage. I went back to cones and my hair is silky, shiny and happy again.

I also use a sulphate-free shampoo. I just pay attention to my hair and clarify whenever I feel there may be build-up. I usually clarify once every 2 to 4 months (followed by a deep moisture treatment).

Good luck:)

lapushka
October 7th, 2013, 02:52 PM
I have F hair and use silicones, full-on silicones in everything except my shampoos (can't have too much "nourishment" on the scalp or it will turn oily fast).

WilfredAllen
October 7th, 2013, 02:59 PM
personally, I have to use sls when I use cones. If you find you do too, perhaps you could dilute the shampoo and only use it when needed. Let us know how it works out!

renia22
October 7th, 2013, 04:28 PM
Hey, why not try it? At best, it will help with the tangling & dryness & you're happy; at worst, you don't like it & go back to silicone free. Better to at least give it a try rather than chopping your hair or dealing with the constant tangling. Not sure which of these are available in your area, but some inexpensive ones that get good reviews from fine haired people are:

Clairol herbal essences smooth & shine collections
Clairol hydralicious featherweight shampoo & conditioner (or hello hydration if dealing with major dryness)
Avon advance technique volume shampoo & conditioner
Neutrogena replenishing shampoo & conditioner
Bath & body works volumizing conditioner

Trukid cool kid conditioner - This conditioner is marketed for kids, but it gets rave reviews from adults too:
http://m.drugstore.com/products/qxp216283

(You might need to alternate a couple of different kinds if the shampoo has silicones and you're finding that it's too much)

Good luck!

Valorie
October 7th, 2013, 04:51 PM
If you're having a difficult time managing it, why not give it a try? Some people use cones, some don't.

Valorie
October 7th, 2013, 04:52 PM
I hope the tone of what I said came across in the spirit of light heartedness, meaning I think it's up to you what works for you :)

woodswanderer
October 7th, 2013, 04:58 PM
Hello, everybody. My name is Woodswanderer, and I'm a cone-head. :whistle: I tried to go cone free (among other hair experiments) and I decided I just like cones. I don't want to wear my hair up all the time, and the cones really help me to keep it manageable. I have been using cones for most of my life and it hasn't caused me any problems.

Ashflower89
October 7th, 2013, 07:25 PM
I agree with what most everyone else is posting. The whole hatred for cones seems pretty recent, and imagine how many hundreds of thousands of people have had healthy happy hair and never once questioned 'poos and cones. It can't be that big of a deal...

bunnylake
October 7th, 2013, 07:33 PM
Use whatever makes you hair and scalp feel and look good to you. After years of toying with alternative washing methods, I have gone back to sulfates and cones and my hair is finally HAPPY! Give it a shot, maybe that's the solution for you also. The same routines will not work for everyone.

Diamond.Eyes
October 8th, 2013, 11:40 PM
Cones can be your favorite product ingredient if used in moderation. :) My hair happens to be addicted to amodimethicone, not that it would blow up and fall off without it, but it seems to give my hair a weightless luster that natural products can't mimic. I seem to get more compliments from my DBF when I use cones also. I used to be fearful that silicone would suffocate my hair strands or something :laugh:, but being educated in hair-care made me see the light: cones aren't always bad. :flower:

Firefox7275
October 9th, 2013, 04:53 AM
I'm SO TIRED of my hair right now. It's damaged, it's tangled, and I'm tired of babying it and getting nowhere. My hair is very fine, and I used to dye it and when it was short I would straighten it. Now it's past bsl, I don't use heat, I've cut off almost all the dyed parts, I BABY it to no end. I don't use sulphates, I don't use silicones, I generally try to use products in it that are as natural as possible. But I was thinking... If, while I'm trying to let my hair grow out, I experiment with silicones. I know they just mask the damage, but I would almost prefer that as opposed to seeing split ends whenever I trim, and then once my hair is longer, give it a good chop. I'm also so tired of my hair being such a tangled mess. I can comb my hair through, and after a minute, I can run my hand through and I'm stuck in it.

So, I guess if I decided to do this, I would have to get a shampoo with sulphates to help prevent build up of the silicones?

Sorry this post is a little messy, I'm at work and shouldn't on here haha, but I'm thinking some may have to be in order when I get off.

Is this a good idea? What are some good shampoos/conditioners to use? Any advice or input on the matter would be appreciated.

IMO ask yourself why your hair is a tangled mess and splitting so easily - is it diet, are you not as gentle as you think, not using protective styles, are you using totally the wrong products for your hair properties, are you wavier than you realise, are your scissors in need of sharpening? Combing and finger combing are damaging in themselves (mechanical damage), try to reduce this to once or twice a day.

Silicones that resist building up so don't need clarifying include water soluble (prefix PEG-) and amine ones (eg. amodimethicone). Otherwise they can be removed with cocoamidopropyl betaine which is gentler than sulphates and other anionics providing it is in an acidic base.

Ingredients proven beneficial for damaged hair include coconut oil, hydrolysed protein, ceramides, 18-MEA and panthenol: these are all found in nature. Fine hair tends to do well with hydrolysed protein for body/ volume and for strengthening, it can help reduce tangling. I rate Komaza Care: the Matani repair treatment spray and Matani leave in are pretty natural and contain several of the ingredients I mentioned (ceramides, protein, panthenol).

There is also Scientific Essentials hair conditioner (18-MEA, protein, panthenol), some of the Redken Extreme line (hardcore silicones, 18-MEA, ceramides, protein), L'Oreal Elvive Full Restore 5 conditioner (ceramides, protein, water soluble silicone, palm oil for slip).

MonaMayfair
October 9th, 2013, 05:17 AM
I use cones and I'm perfectly happy with them - though my hair DID look lovely, smooth and shiny when I was conditioning with catnip. It's supposed to prevent split ends too - I never get them, so I can't attest to that, but I was really surprised at the glass-like shine it gave my hair.
I did use it after every wash for a while, but it was so time consuming and potentially messy that I stopped.

beautifulending
October 9th, 2013, 09:11 PM
My hair loves cones and only behaves with cones, I just make sure to clarify once every 2 weeks as to keep my hair from being dull and limp with build up. You also might want to S&D.