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maegalcarwen
September 22nd, 2013, 06:49 AM
Hey all,

recently I've decided to read on haircare history. I've always been interested, adored the hair of girls from victorian ages. I found these articles, and I was wondering if anyone has any other material on this topic? Either an article or just a comment? Pictures? What do you think about these articles?



Thank you!

http://longhairloversblog.blogspot.nl/search/label/Historic%20Hair

jacqueline101
September 22nd, 2013, 07:34 AM
I'm interested in this as well. I wish I could help you.

goldenlady
September 22nd, 2013, 07:51 AM
Thank you for sharing this! I found it fascinating.. I hope you get much more information :)

Panth
September 22nd, 2013, 09:02 AM
Interesting article. It's kind of fun, because some things they have just right (because they were much more used to caring for long hair than the average modern woman) and some are absolute rubbish (because the science has advanced so much since then).

littlemonster
September 22nd, 2013, 10:07 AM
Reading these are brilliant, thankyou, no other info to add I'm afraid but I constantly scour the internet for random things, if I come across anything I'll add it :)

maegalcarwen
September 22nd, 2013, 02:57 PM
I am so happy you girls liked it! I loved reading it too.

I found it very funny too at some points, all the superstitions.For example, do you think that the childhood hair length has to do anything with how long can you grow your hair out? I found that one very weird. Some of these things are much better explained now,but I still think that in some way, they took better care of their hair. Or it was just more common to (in the noble circles) let it grow out.

Panth
September 22nd, 2013, 03:37 PM
I am so happy you girls liked it! I loved reading it too.

I found it very funny too at some points, all the superstitions.For example, do you think that the childhood hair length has to do anything with how long can you grow your hair out? I found that one very weird. Some of these things are much better explained now,but I still think that in some way, they took better care of their hair. Or it was just more common to (in the noble circles) let it grow out.

Mm, some of those superstitions are very weird. E.g.:


“The principal reason why a woman's hair is stronger, and grows longer than the opposite sex, is that it is allowed to grow long from very early youth. The combing and general care of the hair necessary in the life of a girl also strengthen the hair very greatly.”

This one is complete rubbish. Men (in general) can actually grow longer hair better and faster than women (it's the testosterone - resulting in (on average) thicker hair and a faster growth rate). The reason men usually don't have long hair is simple fashion.
Also, combing hair doesn't strengthen it. As most people on LHC know, any form of manipulation, even the most gentle of combing or styling, will cause at least a tiny bit of damage.


“Some claim that women, being less engaged in mental labor, and having less business worries, are able to secure a more constant and even supply of blood to the scalp.”
*snerk* Erm... the best modern explanation I can think of is that "mental labor" and "business worries" are stress and stress can cause both a slowed growth rate and/or hairfall. However, it's nothing to do with blood supply.


“When the hair is allowed to grow long in the early life of a girl, the nourishment of long hair is possible, but when kept closely cropped as in boys, conditions are decidedly different. The scalp is not so thick and not so much blood is attracted to it, and naturally when weakness or conditions are such as to produce a weakening influence on the hair, the male is far more liable to lose his hair than would a female whose hair is more strongly rooted and nourished.”
Complete rubbish. The length that hair is kept in childhood has no effect on scalp thickness (!?) and that has no effect on the amount of blood circulating (note: circulating, not "attracted to") the scalp. Yes, poor blood flow could result in poor hair growth, but it won't be caused by hair length and certainly not by retrospective hair length in childhood (note: hair follicles don't know how long the hair is and certainly don't remember the length of hairs they grew before).


“Dead hairs should never be allowed to remain in the scalp; they should be plucked as soon as they can be easily removed. Under these circumstances, if they are removed another hair always grows from the same follicle or root sheath; but if this dead hair is allowed to remain until it falls out on its own accord, it often kills the root, and the hair never grows again.”
This one is slightly more interesting, as it is based on a misunderstanding of a true phenomenon. Plucking a hair results in that hair follicle being immediately re-set into starting the anagen (growth) phase. In contrast, when a hair falls out on its own it is because its anagen phase has ended and it has entered catagen (transition phase, ~3 weeks) and then telogen (resting phase, ~3 months, when the hair will fall). So, a follicle whose hair is plucked will immediately begin growing a new hair whilst one whose hair has naturally fallen out (in telogen) may have a further 3 months of telogen before the anagen phase starts again and a new hair begins to grow.
However, the idea that a naturally fallen hair will "kill" the root so that it can never grow hair again is patently absurd - did they think that everyone used to get rapidly, progressively bald before they invented this advice in the early 1900s!


“Baldness cannot be inherited any more than can consumption.”
Wrong. Male pattern baldness in particular has a large genetic component.



“The hair obtains its color from the coloring glands situated nearer the surface than the hair-root. When these glands are destroyed by any means the hair naturally loses its color.”
Nope. ^_^ Hair colour comes from melanin, which is produced by melanocytes which live at the base of the hair follicle. There are no "colouring glands".


“The direct rays of the sun are a tonic of great value for the hair; they impart a luster and richness of color which can be acquired in no other way...Sun the hair all you can on every occasion.”
Not really... the sun might slightly bleach the outer canopy, resulting in a richer variation of hair on one head (i.e. natural highlights) which can be quite attractive. However, this can (particularly with excessive time in the sun) also be quite damaging.


“The color of the hair seems to have quite an influence upon woman's chances in marriage. A far greater proportion of light-haired women live and die unmarried than those with dark hair.”
*snerk* I thought "gentlemen like blondes"? :P

LauraAlaina
August 21st, 2015, 07:05 PM
Oh i love this!!! I read this really fascinating article about boar bristle brushes in victorian times the other night.. let me search for it..


http://ourheritageofhealth.com/the-benefits-of-brushing-your-hair-old-fashioned-hair-care-tips/


I loved this article!!

meteor
August 21st, 2015, 07:50 PM
“Dead hairs should never be allowed to remain in the scalp; they should be plucked as soon as they can be easily removed. Under these circumstances, if they are removed another hair always grows from the same follicle or root sheath; but if this dead hair is allowed to remain until it falls out on its own accord, it often kills the root, and the hair never grows again.”


This one is slightly more interesting, as it is based on a misunderstanding of a true phenomenon. Plucking a hair results in that hair follicle being immediately re-set into starting the anagen (growth) phase. In contrast, when a hair falls out on its own it is because its anagen phase has ended and it has entered catagen (transition phase, ~3 weeks) and then telogen (resting phase, ~3 months, when the hair will fall). So, a follicle whose hair is plucked will immediately begin growing a new hair whilst one whose hair has naturally fallen out (in telogen) may have a further 3 months of telogen before the anagen phase starts again and a new hair begins to grow.
However, the idea that a naturally fallen hair will "kill" the root so that it can never grow hair again is patently absurd - did they think that everyone used to get rapidly, progressively bald before they invented this advice in the early 1900s!

That's very interesting! :D Does anybody know more about this or can share any links/research into this phenomenon? :)