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delitebrite
July 27th, 2013, 11:45 AM
Hi everyone! I'm really sorry if any of my questions have been addressed - I checked out the link with more links for new users and most of them don't seem to work! :(

Anyway, first of all, here is some history on my hair:

My hair originally was very fine and perhaps a medium blonde shade. It USED to be pretty healthy - exceptionally soft and I was frequently complimented on how pretty it was. I started dying my hair at home at age 12 (18 now!) and I have only worn my natural color once since then, when I was 14 for a about a year. It is worth mentioning that I have ONLY ever used ammonia-free hair dye. For about 5 years I used L'Oreal Natural Instincts hair color, but this year (when I went red) I switched to Revlon ColorSilk because they had the color I wanted, are significantly cheaper, and the color lasts longer, imo. Also, I have been heat styling my hair daily since I was probably about 14 or 15.

In spring of 2011, I cut my hair into a bob style that I maintained until that winter, at which point I decided to grow my hair back out. At this time, I had my hair dyed black. Because of how much I've dyed it, my hair is very absorbent so it holds onto color very well. I started using ColorFix to lighten my hair into a shade that could be dyed over easily, but it only lightened my hair to a dark brown. I wore that for a while and had a heck of time trying to match my roots to the rest of my hair, and eventually ended up with tri-colored hair. Because I was growing my hair out (and was also broke!), I learned how to cut my own bangs and just didn't get any trims at a salon, even though my hair still had an a-line shape, haha. I wanted to get more length before I got it evened out. I also do NOT wear layers in my hair. They make it impossible to style, so I keep all of it one length except for the front, where I have bangs and little framing pieces on each side. In October of 2012 my DIY stylist friend gave me some ombre ends using a highlighting kit.

I really loved the look but in January of this year I decided to go back to red (a color I had overlooked since junior high). Knowing that I couldn't remove the color already in my hair, my DIY stylist friend used the same highlighting kit to lighten my entire head. I had a bad experience having my hair professionally bleached when I was 14, and my friend assured me that the bleach in the highlighting kit wasn't as potent as a straight up mix. It worked, and my hair seemed only a little dry. So now I have the red shade I wanted - which I wear for about 6 weeks before touching it up. In May of this year, I noticed that my ends were quite worse for wear, to the point that they weren't really holding color anymore. I actually had split ends! It started with the white dots before splitting up my hair shaft....By the time I got the salon, I had at least an inch or two that was simply beyond repair. I chalked it up to not having it trimmed in so long and the double bleaching they got - so basically, I assumed they were just old and overworked. My hair has gotten to the same length, but my ends are starting to split again!

Starting in June, I gradually stopped using my straightener on a regular basis. Now I usually wear my hair natural and only style my bangs, or I braid or bun my hair and only do the front pieces of hair (including bangs).

MY HAIR:
-Is no longer thin. The shaft itself is neither thin nor thick, HOWEVER, my hair is incredibly dense. It grows very close together and there is a LOT of it. Because of this, it takes THREE hours to air dry - which is one of the reasons I do not wash it every day. I simply do not have the time!
-Has quite a few cowlicks, mostly at the front of my hair. If I let them dry without combing them in place first, I WILL NOT be able to style them into place later. I have spent many years trying and nothing will do it.
-Is naturally inclined to be tangly. I cannot run a comb through my hair without first brushing it. I have broken many combs trying to do this. I literally can comb my hair until it's smooth, wait a minute, and if I try to run a comb through it again it will have new tangles. Because of this, I stash combs everywhere. :)
-Is slightly wavy. I wouldn't say it is straight, but unless I have layers in my hair, then not very much twist comes out of it. I want naturally curly hair more than anything. Because I have so much hair, it takes about a minimum of 2 hours to completely curl my hair (in contrast, it takes 20-40 minutes to straighten it).
-Is "impressionable" when wet. It will dry into whatever position it is left in when wet. If I go to sleep with still damp hair, I will wake up with weird and stubborn kinks in it. If I don't brush it down while it is wet, my bangs will stick straight up and be impossible to restyle.

Here is a breakdown of my routine and the products I use:
-I wash my hair maybe once every three days, when it starts to feel greasy. I use TreSemme NATURALS Moisturizing shampoo and conditioner. I used the un-naturals version for years with great results, but switched to Naturals when it became available. Like I said, I was heat styling my hair every day, usually on the highest heat setting (my straightener goes to maybe 425 degrees?) and not using any products in it, and I NEVER had any split ends until this year. When I wash my hair, I shampoo only my head (letting the run-off rinse the ends). When I condition, I saturate my ends and use a little leftover for my scalp, and then I let the conditioner sit while I finish my shower routine. The first thing I do when I get in the shower is shampoo, and the last thing I do before I get it out is rinse my conditioner out. :)
-Once I get out of the shower, I wrap my hair in a towel. I do NOT rub the towel against my hair or anything, I just wrap it up so I don't drip water everywhere. Like I said, my hair is dense, so it holds a lot of water and I leave pools everywhere (which really irritates my boyfriend!). I leave it in the towel for 20-30 minutes, until it's not dripping wet anymore but still damp. Then I brush it out straight and let it air dry. Sometimes I "scrunch" it to get a little bit more natural wave.
-I usually wear it down and natural - unless it is hot. If I'm just hanging out at home and I'm too hot, I will usually put it up with a clip. If I'm casually going out, I will braid it or tie it off to the side (using a hair tie with no metal pieces - I think I use Goodie Ouchless or something. I learned a long time ago - metal hurts!) and style the front pieces. If I need to look a bit fancier, I put up into a twisty bun (I make a ponytail, and then using another hair tie I wrap it around itself into a bun) and style the front. I NEVER go to sleep with my hair up because when I wake up it is really knotted up and poofy.
-If my hair is starting to get greasy and I don't have any time to wash it, I use Got2Be dry shampoo.
-If I don't wash my hair while showering, I put it up into a loose bun (making a ponytail but not pulling it all the way through), put on a braided, strappy headband to keep my bangs back, and use a shower cap. Then I dry off quickly and take my hair back out immediately.
-I use a Revlon tourmaline brush, and cheapie combs that come in packs of multiples. The straightener I use is a Revlon Wet2Straight (it is an extremely rare occurrence that I style my hair when it is damp - almost never happens) that is soy infused.



I am VERY confused about why I am having a problem with split ends, still! I've been much nicer to my hair after getting it trimmed than I ever have been before. I would like to get a shower filter (because we have hard water here) to see if that helps at all (although it has never been an issue before). I would also like to start using home conditioning/shine treatments, but I'm not sure what kind of recipe to use. If you have any advice, I would greatly appreciate any tips! Although, please don't tell me not to do such and such thing without offering an alternative. I am aware that there are a couple things I am doing that are hard on my hair, but they are necessary to keep my hair at all manageable, so if you have a solution that won't damage my hair, I would love to hear it! Also if you have any advice on products I should use, or recipe suggestions, I would also really appreciate those!

I'm so sorry this so long, but I tried to be as inclusive as possible. Thank you for any advice! :)

AmyBeth
July 27th, 2013, 12:03 PM
I am no expert, but it sounds to me like your hair has just been through the wringer with all the color and heat styling. If you really like red, you could look into Manic Panic, which is supposed to actually be good for your hair. Henna is also good, but much more permanent. Try using coconut oil, I can practically hear your hair screaming for it! Also look into the catnip threads here at LHC. Take good care of your hair, microtrim and be patient. It may take a year or more before you see the end of all the damage. It will still be very pretty while you are growing it out- I'm sure no one else will notice the splits.

ExpectoPatronum
July 27th, 2013, 12:28 PM
I second Amy Beth with coconut oil! I dyed and flat ironed my hair all the time when I was a teen. I stopped coloring it when I was in high school, but didn't stop flat ironing it for another year or so after. It's been four years and I'm still growing out the damage from flat ironing. Having splits occurring so frequently is annoying, but there are some things you can do that will really help in cutting down the number of split ends.

-COCONUT OIL. Or some kind of oil that will penetrate the hair, like olive or avocado. Do oil treatments on the ends of your hair before you shampoo.
-Try CWC when you wash your hair. The only way it's different from your current routine is that you apply conditioner to your length before you shampoo as well as after. This will protect your ends from possibly being dried out more from your shampoo.
-You may also want to try a protein treatment...But be careful as some hair types don't like protein. (Like mine :( )
-Wear your hair up in a bun when you're sleeping. I think this has been one of the best things I've started doing for my hair as I've noticed a definite reduction in my split ends.
-In fact, wear your hair up in protective styles whenever you can. This will minimize mechanical damage and reduce split ends.
-Microtrims/dusting. Cutting off half an inch of your ends every couple of months can do wonders in making your ends look and feel neat. Or, you can try trimming an inch off every three-four months are so. The key to trims is to find a way where it's frequent enough that it keeps your ends neat, but not so often that you're cutting off all your new growth.
-If you don't want to trim any length off your hair at all, I recommend 'search and destroy.' This involves going in with scissors and cutting just the split hairs.
-Second part about trims, buy actual hair cutting scissors and use them ONLY for your hair. It will save you a lot of frustration. Trust me.

Anyway, I hope this helps!

delitebrite
July 27th, 2013, 12:51 PM
I second Amy Beth with coconut oil! I dyed and flat ironed my hair all the time when I was a teen. I stopped coloring it when I was in high school, but didn't stop flat ironing it for another year or so after. It's been four years and I'm still growing out the damage from flat ironing. Having splits occurring so frequently is annoying, but there are some things you can do that will really help in cutting down the number of split ends.

-COCONUT OIL. Or some kind of oil that will penetrate the hair, like olive or avocado. Do oil treatments on the ends of your hair before you shampoo.
-Try CWC when you wash your hair. The only way it's different from your current routine is that you apply conditioner to your length before you shampoo as well as after. This will protect your ends from possibly being dried out more from your shampoo.
-You may also want to try a protein treatment...But be careful as some hair types don't like protein. (Like mine :( )
-Wear your hair up in a bun when you're sleeping. I think this has been one of the best things I've started doing for my hair as I've noticed a definite reduction in my split ends.
-In fact, wear your hair up in protective styles whenever you can. This will minimize mechanical damage and reduce split ends.
-Microtrims/dusting. Cutting off half an inch of your ends every couple of months can do wonders in making your ends look and feel neat. Or, you can try trimming an inch off every three-four months are so. The key to trims is to find a way where it's frequent enough that it keeps your ends neat, but not so often that you're cutting off all your new growth.
-If you don't want to trim any length off your hair at all, I recommend 'search and destroy.' This involves going in with scissors and cutting just the split hairs.
-Second part about trims, buy actual hair cutting scissors and use them ONLY for your hair. It will save you a lot of frustration. Trust me.

Anyway, I hope this helps!

About the coconut oil: How long should I leave it in before washing it out? And do I use it every time before shampooing? I used coconut oil on my skin for a long time (it's very dry and sensitive) and I think it's probably the best moisturizer but I was having trouble finding stuff that didn't seem like it had been sitting on a shelf for a decade. I will try the CWC thing and see if that helps, too. What do you use to put your hair up to sleep in? I use those Ouchless hair ties to put up my hair, but whenever I've fallen asleep with my hair up I wake up with a huge mess and the hair tie ends up stuck in a rats nest. That's why I use the clippie when my appearance isn't a factor - it doesn't tangle. :) But it is extremely uncomfortable to sleep in. I own a pair of hair cutting scissors from when I cut my bangs, and I did some S&D before, I'm just a little bit reluctant to do my own trims. I stopped doing my own bangs because they started out really well but I ended up really messing them up after about 6 months. So I will probably do the S&D instead of dusting (although that sounds like so much less work haha!).

Thank you for the advice, though! I never considered some of this stuff. :)

jeanniet
July 27th, 2013, 12:52 PM
Damage is cumulative, which means the damage is going to be worst on the oldest hair, which of course is your ends. You're going to keep seeing splits until you've grown out and cut off the worst of the damage (which essentially all the hair prior to when you started modifying your styling methods). Bear in mind that since you want to continue doing some damaging things, you're probably going to see the effects on your ends as you grow your hair out. You can mitigate the damage as much as possible, but not eliminate it. Coconut oil soaks would be good, and you should also be doing regular protein treatments because your hair is so porous, followed by deep moisture treatments. I'd look into using a sulfate-free shampoo as well. The Tresemme conditioner is good, but the shampoo contains sulfates. Shea Moisture Moisture Retention shampoo is a good one. Try to dilute your shampoo as well--most people don't need as much as shampoo as they use.

ExpectoPatronum
July 27th, 2013, 01:39 PM
About the coconut oil: How long should I leave it in before washing it out? And do I use it every time before shampooing? I used coconut oil on my skin for a long time (it's very dry and sensitive) and I think it's probably the best moisturizer but I was having trouble finding stuff that didn't seem like it had been sitting on a shelf for a decade. I will try the CWC thing and see if that helps, too. What do you use to put your hair up to sleep in? I use those Ouchless hair ties to put up my hair, but whenever I've fallen asleep with my hair up I wake up with a huge mess and the hair tie ends up stuck in a rats nest. That's why I use the clippie when my appearance isn't a factor - it doesn't tangle. :) But it is extremely uncomfortable to sleep in. I own a pair of hair cutting scissors from when I cut my bangs, and I did some S&D before, I'm just a little bit reluctant to do my own trims. I stopped doing my own bangs because they started out really well but I ended up really messing them up after about 6 months. So I will probably do the S&D instead of dusting (although that sounds like so much less work haha!).

Thank you for the advice, though! I never considered some of this stuff. :)

You leave the coconut oil in as long as you want. Sometimes I leave it in for half an hour, sometimes overnight. It just depends on what I'm doing that day and if I'm noticing my ends drying out. I also use coconut oil on my face! I love it.

To put my hair up at night, I use a goody ribbon elastic. My hair doesn't seem to tangle around it nor does it really pull my hair out when I remove it.
http://www.goody.com/Products/Hair_Accessories/Ouchless_Ribbon_Elastics

I don't know if that's the same thing you're using. If they aren't, I found mine at Walmart. If they are, that sucks they don't work for you :(

delitebrite
July 27th, 2013, 01:57 PM
Damage is cumulative, which means the damage is going to be worst on the oldest hair, which of course is your ends. You're going to keep seeing splits until you've grown out and cut off the worst of the damage (which essentially all the hair prior to when you started modifying your styling methods). Bear in mind that since you want to continue doing some damaging things, you're probably going to see the effects on your ends as you grow your hair out. You can mitigate the damage as much as possible, but not eliminate it. Coconut oil soaks would be good, and you should also be doing regular protein treatments because your hair is so porous, followed by deep moisture treatments. I'd look into using a sulfate-free shampoo as well. The Tresemme conditioner is good, but the shampoo contains sulfates. Shea Moisture Moisture Retention shampoo is a good one. Try to dilute your shampoo as well--most people don't need as much as shampoo as they use.

What are protein treatments? Will they make my hair more resistant to color? I will look for a sulfate free shampoo. The tip about diluting is a very smart, as well. :) Thank you.

delitebrite
July 27th, 2013, 01:58 PM
You leave the coconut oil in as long as you want. Sometimes I leave it in for half an hour, sometimes overnight. It just depends on what I'm doing that day and if I'm noticing my ends drying out. I also use coconut oil on my face! I love it.

To put my hair up at night, I use a goody ribbon elastic. My hair doesn't seem to tangle around it nor does it really pull my hair out when I remove it.
http://www.goody.com/Products/Hair_Accessories/Ouchless_Ribbon_Elastics

I don't know if that's the same thing you're using. If they aren't, I found mine at Walmart. If they are, that sucks they don't work for you :(

No, I have been using just the plain ole ones without any metal. I noticed those ribbon ties have gotten very popular, though, and I was meaning to try them out. I will definitely pick some up. Thanks! :)

CurlyCaz
July 27th, 2013, 02:05 PM
Are you still dyeing your hair?

What colour is it now? Is it all one colour?

delitebrite
July 27th, 2013, 02:18 PM
Are you still dyeing your hair?

What colour is it now? Is it all one colour?

Yes, I'm still dying it. This (http://www.drugstore.com/products/prod.asp?pid=164738&catid=183437&cmbProdBrandFilter=1290&aid=338666&aparam=goobase_filler&device=c&network=g&matchtype=) is the dye I use. It is all one color now, for the most part. I dye it myself so sometimes I miss little sections every now and then, but it just looks like highlights. It fades out to a very natural ginger color that I love, but I have to keep retouching it because my roots are not pretty. :) This (http://delitebrite.tumblr.com/post/48148202348/watching-life-of-pi) is when it's fresh (not a great view of it, but you can see the color), and this (http://delitebrite.tumblr.com/post/52610718030/john-and-i-c) is it after about a month. Once it gets to that color it stays until I touch it up.

AmyBeth
July 27th, 2013, 02:31 PM
I love my sleep cap from Silky Cocoon on Etsy. I keep harping about sleep caps because most people sleep 7-8 hours per night, 365 night per year. That is a lot of potential friction, tangles and breakage. It's such a simple thing to do. My DH just had to get used to it!:) Along with the white cotton gloves and socks for moisturizing. Yes, I'm very sexy when I sleep. Why not use that time? I use coconut oil all the time. Use it as a deep conditioner overnight, a prewash, and very lightly for a leave in after washing. I also love avocado oil! Some people use Crisco! Experimenting with different oils is fun and not too expensive. I love looking at the ethnic hair care sections at stores. Lots of fun things to try.

delitebrite
July 27th, 2013, 02:51 PM
I love my sleep cap from Silky Cocoon on Etsy. I keep harping about sleep caps because most people sleep 7-8 hours per night, 365 night per year. That is a lot of potential friction, tangles and breakage. It's such a simple thing to do. My DH just had to get used to it!:) Along with the white cotton gloves and socks for moisturizing. Yes, I'm very sexy when I sleep. Why not use that time? I use coconut oil all the time. Use it as a deep conditioner overnight, a prewash, and very lightly for a leave in after washing. I also love avocado oil! Some people use Crisco! Experimenting with different oils is fun and not too expensive. I love looking at the ethnic hair care sections at stores. Lots of fun things to try.

A sleep cap sounds like a GREAT investment. I definitely think I'll look for one next time I'm at the store. :)

~honeyflower~
July 27th, 2013, 02:55 PM
You are doing a good job on your routine already.
Although, there are some small changes that could help for the long term.

-don't brush nor comb your hair when its wet or damp, hair is very fragile when its wet. I use my fingers to separate clumps and gently untangle any knots then part my hair. Just leave it alone until it is dries.
-I know your almost there, but try going all heat free. No straighteners,hairdryers,curling irons. If you want curly hair you can try getting your hair damp and do braids,socks, straws,buns just remember that each technique has different curling affects.
-good job of not rubbing your head with a towel. :) However, towels can be rough on hair as well because of the texture of the fabric. Best to use is a plain old cotton t-shirt or a microfiber towel.
-I don't bun at night, but most people use spin pins or silk scrunchies for nightime bunning.I am a personal spin pin user and my hair stays in like a rock! Before I had to use 70-50 bobby pins to keep hair in place but now I use 5 spin pins. I don't think you will need as many as I do but if you want,they are at Walmart in a pack of 2 and recently I found them at K-mart in a pack of three.
-wear hair up on rainy,snowy,windy days and place it in your hoodie so that your hair doesn't get weather damage.
-remember to wear hair up often but not all the time. I made the mistake to wear hair up all day, everyday and got tiny bald spots.
-main thing is to focus on your roots first because that will be your length in 3-4 years and the damage will be cut off gradually. Once you have a healthy routine going it will be a cinch.
Good luck! And welcome to LHC! :)

~honeyflower~
July 27th, 2013, 02:56 PM
Oh dear,sorry double post!

Killahkurlz
July 27th, 2013, 03:04 PM
I use coconut oil on my ends frequently during the week but I don't wash it out unless it's wash day. also, try almond oil or grape seed oil. I've never tried the grape seed but it has some chemical in it to seal the cuticule and prevent frizz. that could also be contributing to your tangles as well.

biogirl87
July 27th, 2013, 03:35 PM
delitebrite, I know how frustrated you must be with your hair. I was going through some of what you're experiencing with your hair when I was in high school as I would be seeing split ends at times and sometimes even split ends on top of split ends. Part of that with me was that at that time I would brush my hair when it was slightly damp before it was fully dry as brushing it after it was fully dry meant going through the tangles and sometimes ripping my brush through them. But that was before I found out the benefits of detangling and combing. So I can understand how you feel. I'd like to second honeyflower's suggestion in not brushing your hair when it's wet or even damp. If you get a wide-tooth comb, depending on your hair type you might be able to comb your hair when it's damp. Some people (curlies, for example) will comb their hair in the shower when it's wet but they do it when they have a lot of conditioner in their hair. What I would suggest you do to help with the tangles is use your fingers and then maybe a wide-tooth comb to detangle your hair before you wash it. After it's detangled, you can use a brush to help dislodge the sebum and the dead skin cells on your scalp to make it easier when you shampoo your hair. Since your hair is porous and damaged, you can start using conditioners with silicones in them as they give your hair some slip, making it easier to detangle and to deal with until you can get the damage cut off. Unless you have really stick straight hair, I think it might be best if you leave your hair alone when it's drying (after I wash my hair I let it drip dry but put a dry bath towel around my shoulders so that the water from my hair soaks into the towel. When your hair is fully dry, you can detangle it first with your fingers and then using a wide-tooth comb. You could then use a brush to style your hair, but I don't think using a brush on damp hair would help with split ends. Other members have given good advice about trimming and cutting off split ends, which should help as well. Good luck and let us know how you're doing.

jeanniet
July 27th, 2013, 05:29 PM
What are protein treatments? Will they make my hair more resistant to color? I will look for a sulfate free shampoo. The tip about diluting is a very smart, as well. :) Thank you.

I don't think they would make your hair more resistant, but they will help strengthen your hair. The reason your hair is so porous is that the cuticle has been lifted and damaged by heat, bleaching, and coloring. The protein helps to temporarily fill in the damaged areas. You can buy protein treatments, or make them yourself (here's one recipe: http://pedaheh.blogspot.com/2012/05/gelatin-protein-treatment.html).

curlytwirlykate
July 27th, 2013, 05:42 PM
delitebrite! Welcome to the forums :)

Most people addressed what I had planned to say... the lovely people who have replied to you are giving you FANTASTIC advice.

Here's a bit more!

1) On the note of sleep caps: I ordered a silk sleep cap on ebay for SUPER cheap. Couldn't find any in my city, but I think I paid $6 for two sleep caps. Super simple -- silk + elastic -- but I got to choose from a bunch of colours! They shipped from China and were at my Canadian door in two weeks. Best investment I've ever made. Now, I rotate them: one for dry hair at night time (to get second-day hair!), one for wet hair at night time (this includes coconut-oiled), and one for when I'm riding my bike (a HUGE place of breakage is my cycling helmet). So. Good.

2) On the note of tangles: Have you tried any wide-toothed combs? It may take you awhile to get through your hair with the comb, but it might be less damaging on your hair than fine-toothed combs.

3) On the note of tangles, also: Perhaps you need a product + comb combo. Look for leave-in products that contain behentrimonium methosulfate -- this is a detangling agent that should help you get a comb (and fingers!!) through your hair. I don't know why it works, but detangling is what it's meant for. For what it's worth, I've had great success with Desert Essence Shine and Refine Hair Lotion (http://www.vitacost.com/desert-essence-shine-and-refine-hair-lotion-coconut-6-4-fl-oz) and Kinky Curly Knot Today (http://www.target.com/p/kinky-curly-knot-today-leave-in-conditioner-detangler-8-oz/-/A-13044269). I know that the latter is targeted towards people with more curl than yourself, but it's main application is for slip and detangling, so it might work for you. The less work your comb has to do, the better your ends will be, I think!

Good luck!

Firefox7275
July 28th, 2013, 06:09 AM
I like long first posts, the information is helpful! Firstly it's worth understanding that hair is dead, nothing can repair the damage done by past dying and high heat, some of the hair may not be salvageable and needs to be trimmed off - unfortunately you may need to cut much higher than the white dots to remove the 'fried' hair. Definitely anything that is not holding colour, that is a sign the cuticle is permanently lifted or even destroyed completely and there is very high porosity in the cortex. Even by being kind to your hair you can only reduce the amount of everyday damage from washing, brushing, combing, sunlight and so on, clearly even this level of 'weathering' is too much for your ends.

Ammonia free hair colour is not gentler than any other permanent hair colour that is marketing - the damage is done by the strength of the peroxide (in every permanent box dye even dark), the alkalinity of the product, repeat dying the lengths. The best thing you can do for your hair here is to use the weakest product possible on the roots only, dye over the top of a heavy coconut oil soak. Then do the lengths with a high pigment semi permanent colour like Manic Panic or La Riche Directions - these are just dye molecules in a conditioner base NO damaging ingredients whatsoever. To get an intense longlasting colour leave the dye on for between two hours and overnight: strand test on shed plughole hair. I do this and my rich pink-red colour lasts better than it ever did with box dyes, it's still intense after two to four months. IIRC Color Zap is technically a colour stripper not a colour remover because it contains peroxide, peroxide free colour removers include Colour B4 and Colour Oops and these can need to be used several times to shift built up dye.

Straightening wet or even slightly damp hair is one of the worst things you can do and can damage hair irreparably if done even once, high temperatures is another one.
http://www.thenaturalhavenbloom.com/2009/05/straightening-factshow-hot-is-too-hot.html
http://www.thenaturalhavenbloom.com/2010/11/heat-on-wet-hair-bubble-hair.html
http://www.hairfree.bz/Article.pdf
Solution is to start wearing your natural wavy hair the vast majority of the time and heat free methods like 'wet wrapping' when you want it straight for special occasions (see YouTube for tutorials).

Come over to the Wavy Hair Community on Facebook or NaturallyCurly Curl Talk forums and learn about the Curly Girl method. I would take a bet that your cowlicks and fluffiness and poofiness are way more hidden wave than you realise, it's VERY common not to be aware of this because standard haircare methods like brushing and towel turbans pull hair straight. I have wavy hair between 2a to 2c (I have ringlets at the front and sides!) and not I nor my own mother, nor any hairdresser ever realised until I was in my late thirties and I tried the Curly Girl method. I have had to grow out a lot of damage to see my true curl pattern tho, it was a slow road. I thought my hair was 'naturally' poofy/ fluffy/ tangly/ unmanageable, nope it was just being abused!

Scientifically proven beneficial ingredients for porous, damaged or colour treated hair include coconut oil, hydrolysed protein, ceramides and panthenol - ideally use all four because they all act in different ways to reduce porosity, increase elasticity, penetrate to strengthen the hair and patch repair surface damage. Do overnight coconut oil soaks on dry hair washed out with a silicone free conditioner (you can use your Tresemme Naturals, see YouTube for tutorials on conditioner only washing), this is gentler than any shampoo. For protein restructuring products like Komaza Care protein strengthener or Colorful neutral protein filler from Sallys. For ceramides and panthenol I like Komaza Care Matani repair treatment spray (also contains a little protein), various other items from the Matani and Moja lines contain ceramides but I have not tried them all yet, panthenol is in many commercial conditioners anyway.

Brushing and combing are damaging wet or dry, more so if you are rough or you are working with already damaged hair. The more frequently you brush or comb/ more number of strokes the more damage you do. Wavy hair ideally should not be brushed at all, that encourages poof/ fluff/ frizz. Detangle when you are in the shower hair loaded in conditioner with fingers only, then working up to a very wide tooth seamless comb or double row detangling comb like the Dimples afro comb, Mebco shower comb or Ouidad comb. Detangle SLOWLY and patiently in small sections from the bottom up, this may take quite some time with badly damaged hair.

For fewer tangles overnight get a silk or satin pillowcase, put your hair into a 'pineapple' with a loose scrunchie or loosely braid it. You can also use a large silk or satin sleep bonnet: some prefer the pillowcase, some the bonnet and some use both. For tying off your hair even ouchless elastics are damaging on colour damaged hair, I speak from bitter experience having just spent two years growing out breakage at the back of the head and all around the hairline partly caused by ponytails with ouchless elastics and partly by repeated brushing through the day. Instead use anything silk or satin, soft microfibre, terry towel ponios, scrunchies, Spin Pins/ Hair Scroos.

HTH!

WilfredAllen
July 29th, 2013, 11:49 PM
don't combine coconut oil with products that contain protein (especially conditioners). I fried several inches of my hair by trying to moisturize it more lol

Basically the more you know about your hair, hair science and the products your are using the better. Don't do a treatment just because people report it works well for them. I also feel that it's often best to avoid adding new products and treatments if what you're doing is working fine. If you really want to change something, just add one new thing at a time so it's simpler to monitor the results.

nanea
July 30th, 2013, 12:19 AM
Your hair sounds exactly like mine before I decided to make big changes to my daily hair care routine. I had an incident with bleaching and colouring regularly all of the time which turned my hair terribly over processed. It was horrible! I would brush my hair with a giant, rubber bristle comb when it was soaking wet and it broke my hair all of the way to the crown and my hair would spring up whenever the brush ran through it. When it would dry, I had these terrible frizzy patches of breakage on the sides of my head that looked like poodle fur! Awful awful. And now two years later my hair is pretty much awesomely healthy! :D (I remember I kept dying my naturally dark brown hair with boxes of a blonde dye for a week straight so I can obtain the bright red colour I always wanted. Such a fail on my part. . /:)

So split ends? I would recommend to trim a bit more often (not like everyday but maybe once or twice a month [microtrims]) so you can help your hair grow out the damaged, coloured hair. I also recommend a good protein treatment for your hair. Protein will fill in the cuticles of your hair and also add much strength and shine back into your hair. Once a month I will egg bomb my hair and it works absolute wonders! ! :D

Egg bomb DIY hair mask recipe:
1 egg
2 tbsp olive oil
1 tbsp honey
Mix together the olive oil and honey a bowl. Then in a separate bowl, extract the yolk of 1 egg. (Do not use the whites. They will make the mask runny and harder to apply.) Add the oil and honey mix to the yolk bowl and wisk together. Then apply all over the hair roots to ends. (Focus mostly on the ends for those have the most damage.) Leave on for 30-40 minutes then rinse with warm or cool water then shampoo and condition as normal. Your hair will feel absolutely rejuvenated. :D

Careful to not overload on protein though. Too much protein may cause the hair to break. Like you can't do this mask everyday but once or twice a month will keep your hair in amazing shape. :)

Also based off of my traumatic hair damage experience do not brush your hair when it wet. Comb it instead! And I definitely recommend you get a seamless bone comb. (I got mine from hairsense.com and it has saved my hair!) Also make sure to keep your hair moisturized. Moisture in the hair will prevent dryness and splitting. Perhaps deep condition once a week or so?

I hope this helped you out. :D

Firefox7275
July 30th, 2013, 05:22 AM
Egg bomb DIY hair mask recipe:
1 egg
2 tbsp olive oil
1 tbsp honey
Mix together the olive oil and honey a bowl. Then in a separate bowl, extract the yolk of 1 egg. (Do not use the whites. They will make the mask runny and harder to apply.) Add the oil and honey mix to the yolk bowl and wisk together. Then apply all over the hair roots to ends. (Focus mostly on the ends for those have the most damage.) Leave on for 30-40 minutes then rinse with warm or cool water then shampoo and condition as normal. Your hair will feel absolutely rejuvenated. :D

Careful to not overload on protein though. Too much protein may cause the hair to break. Like you can't do this mask everyday but once or twice a month will keep your hair in amazing shape. :)


Sorry but I think you have misunderstood what you are doing. Whole egg proteins are too large to penetrate and by taking away the white you have substantially reduced the protein content since that is basically all egg white is (virtually no carbs or fat), AFAIK the only foodstuff protein that can penetrate hair is gelatin because it is 'naturally' hydrolysed.
http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/dairy-and-egg-products/113/2
http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/dairy-and-egg-products/112/2
http://www.thenaturalhavenbloom.com/2009/06/size-matters-protein-conditioning-part.html

IMO your DIY mask is actually a lipid and humectant treatment - deep conditioning - both the egg yolk and the olive oil are rich sources of the fatty acid oleic acid which is small enough to penetrate hair, presumably reducing porosity and increasing elasticity as lauric acid in coconut oil does. Cholesterol/ lecithin and saturated fatty acids in the egg yolk which are similar to the lipids found on the surface of the hair so might patch repair that, honey is a potent humectant (attracts water) and mildly acidic so may help encourage the cuticle to lay flat.
http://journal.scconline.org/pdf/cc2005/cc056n05/p00283-p00295.pdf

Leeloo
July 31st, 2013, 12:38 AM
Welcome! I second all the good folks here. Sometimes it's the things you don't do that make the biggest difference like no heat, color, brushing. Happy growing

jacqueline101
July 31st, 2013, 02:39 AM
I'd say stop using chemical dye and try oiling your hair. I'd wear it up or protect it.