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queenofheartz44
July 26th, 2013, 06:45 AM
What are some good items I should invest in for healthy hair? I'm wondering about brushes, combs, oils, conditioner, etc. Looking for a type of Healthy hair 101 if that makes sense, I want to do this hair journey right. :)

Arien
July 26th, 2013, 06:49 AM
For the most part you need to try different things and find out what suits you. I don't think there is exactly a healthy hair 101 :D. but I will say a Tangle Teezer has been an excellent investment for me. I just bought 2 more yesterday in fact :).

Fairlight63
July 26th, 2013, 07:02 AM
Sleep cap
large tooth comb
oil for hair (Olive oil, coconut oil, Jojoba, etc) what ever your hair likes
100 % boar bristle brush, if your hair is the type that likes it
Things to hold your hair up (Ficcare, Flex-8, etc)

Firefox7275
July 26th, 2013, 07:23 AM
What are some good items I should invest in for healthy hair? I'm wondering about brushes, combs, oils, conditioner, etc. Looking for a type of Healthy hair 101 if that makes sense, I want to do this hair journey right. :)

Depends on your hair properties, dew points/ humidity and to a lesser extent curl pattern. For damaged hair beneficial ingredients include coconut oil, hydrolysed protein, ceramides and panthenol. Fine hair tends to like protein, coarse hair tends to hate it. Porous hair often likes penetrating ingredients, low porosity the same ingredients might weigh hair down or build up and make it tangly. In very high or very low dews the major humectants (glycerin, aloe vera, honey, propylene glycol) can cause problems especially for porous hair, but in the right dews they can 'moisturise' or soften hair. Many oils do not penetrate, that is not necessarily a bad thing if the benefits of the oil sitting on the surface are what you want (eg. protection, detangling, sealing).

In general silk or satin pillowcase OR silk or satin sleep cap; for up dos silk or satin hair ties, scrunchies, Spin Pins and bobby pins; for straight hair perhaps a Tangle Teezer but for wavy or curly hair a wide tooth seamless detangling comb; some hair types don't care what towel is used but those with frizz/ poof/ fluff can do well with an old-t-shirt/ flour sack towel/ smooth microfibre.

Are you transitioning from relaxer to natural hair or intending to keep on relaxing/ stretch the gap between? Do you want to wear your hair straight or curly long term?

lapushka
July 26th, 2013, 08:04 AM
Wide tooth comb (seamless)
Tangle Teezer
An oil or serum for styling
A good thick moisturizing conditioner (such as Herbal Essences Hello Hydration)
Shampoo or lots of conditioner (if you're CO-washing)
A leave-in cream/conditioner
Gel for styling the curls
Try looking into the "curly girl method (http://www.wikihow.com/Follow-the-Curly-Girl-Method-for-Curly-Hair)", search for the book by Lorraine Massey!

RavennaNight
July 26th, 2013, 08:17 AM
Try a horn comb, and some coconut oil. Clarify your hair with either SLS shampoo or I have heard baking soda works, to start fresh with whatever products you choose. Use them for a while to see what is effective. Don't buy a million things at once so you can't tell what is working and what is not.

jacqueline101
July 26th, 2013, 08:40 AM
I would keep the products that work already and get a few you think will work.

majesticmoon
July 26th, 2013, 08:59 AM
Hair teas have really been helping me lately also a horn comb and boars bristle brush. For me i dont do the shampoo anymore but you can try some shampoo bars if you do. Also oils are wonderful for hair. Good luck and happy shopping

Warda
July 26th, 2013, 10:05 AM
For me: conditioner, lots of coconut oil, almond oil, olive oil, castor oil, shampoo without sulphates, a wide tooth comb, a bbb, a hair clip, scrunchies, spin pins, henna, a good moisturising deep conditioner. Thats all I can think of at the moment.

On my shopping list I have shea butte. I really want to try it.

But I dont think there is a fixed list that works for everyone. I wish it was like that!

Warda
July 26th, 2013, 10:10 AM
Also I think you should see what sounds good to you and try one thing at a time, so you know what works best for you.
There are also so much other wonderful oils as well. Ahhh theres so much to try ha

Good luck! :)

sarahthegemini
July 26th, 2013, 10:14 AM
Well for me, my list consists of:
*LOTS of conditioner - I cwc, so use a lot
*EVOO - for heavy overnight oilings/pre-wash treatments
*Wooden wide tooth comb
*A light oil to use as a leave-in/to seal moisture, e.g sweet almond
*Scrunchies - to bun my hair at night

oatmealpie
July 26th, 2013, 10:36 AM
For me, healthy hair has been as much about getting rid of stuff as getting new stuff.

- Stop using your sulfate-based shampoo. You can replace it with conditioner-only washing, a sulfate-free shampoo, or shampoo bars.
- Stop using your conditioner and styling products with silicones in them. Replace them with 'cone-free conditioners from this list (http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=2216).
- Avoid using your blow dryer, curling iron, hot curlers, and flat iron.
- If you have curly or frizzy hair, stop using your terry cloth towel and dry your hair with t-shirts or a smooth microfiber towel instead.
- Then invest in coconut or sweet almond oil, apple cider vinegar, and one or two SheaMoisture or Kinky-Curly products.

Leeloo
July 26th, 2013, 12:02 PM
Not to repeat everyone else here I’d say a heat cap for oil moisturizing treatments and some hair sticks :grnbiggri

queenofheartz44
July 26th, 2013, 02:57 PM
Firefox7275: I intend to keep relaxing/stretching the gap between and wearing my hair straighter. :) I just finished a post in one of my other threads that I hope explains things well, http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=113953 I hope I did that right. Still getting down the posting quirks.

queenofheartz44
July 26th, 2013, 02:58 PM
Edit: I think this link takes you directly to the post. http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?p=2480102#poststop

jeanniet
July 26th, 2013, 05:18 PM
Since you do relax and flat iron and want to keep doing that, I would concentrate on products you need to mitigate damage--protein and moisture treatments--more than anything else. So coconut oil, ingredients for deep treatments (aloe vera gel, honey, a good conditioner), protein treatments. A good quality wide-toothed comb, and maybe a hair toy or two if your hair is long enough for updos. But in your case, damage control is more important than anything else, because if you don't minimize the damage you won't get the length. I'd also get a decent pair of hair scissors so you can microtrim to help keep your ends fresh. You don't have to trim much, and you'll still get growth.

Warda
July 26th, 2013, 07:06 PM
For me, healthy hair has been as much about getting rid of stuff as getting new stuff.

- Stop using your sulfate-based shampoo. You can replace it with conditioner-only washing, a sulfate-free shampoo, or shampoo bars.
- Stop using your conditioner and styling products with silicones in them. Replace them with 'cone-free conditioners from this list (http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=2216).
- Avoid using your blow dryer, curling iron, hot curlers, and flat iron.
- If you have curly or frizzy hair, stop using your terry cloth towel and dry your hair with t-shirts or a smooth microfiber towel instead.
- Then invest in coconut or sweet almond oil, apple cider vinegar, and one or two SheaMoisture or Kinky-Curly products.

Yes I think you have a good point oatmealpie, there are more things to avoid for healthy hair. I think that is definatly what makes a real difference and is very important!

jeanniet
July 26th, 2013, 09:21 PM
For me, healthy hair has been as much about getting rid of stuff as getting new stuff.

- Stop using your sulfate-based shampoo. You can replace it with conditioner-only washing, a sulfate-free shampoo, or shampoo bars.
- Stop using your conditioner and styling products with silicones in them. Replace them with 'cone-free conditioners from this list (http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=2216).
- Avoid using your blow dryer, curling iron, hot curlers, and flat iron.
- If you have curly or frizzy hair, stop using your terry cloth towel and dry your hair with t-shirts or a smooth microfiber towel instead.
- Then invest in coconut or sweet almond oil, apple cider vinegar, and one or two SheaMoisture or Kinky-Curly products.

Cones don't automatically make your hair unhealthy, though, and some hair types do very well with them. People following the curly girl method generally avoid them, but not always. There are a number of members here who even CO with a coney conditioner. I think cones are definitely YMMV.

I never use ACV. :D But I do use citric acid rinses.

WilfredAllen
July 27th, 2013, 01:11 AM
- microfibre hair towel
- scrunchies
- wide tooth comb
- tangle teezer

don't invest too much in products until you determine generally what your hair likes and doesn't like, IMO

Anne10
July 27th, 2013, 01:18 AM
My list:

- shower head water filter
- natural, non-stripping shampoos
- several kinds of conditioner, both leave-in and rinse out
- seamless wide toothed comb
- hair clips and bands that don't tear hair
- boars bristle brush
- satin or silk pillowcases
- multivitamin
- GNC Hair, Skin and Nail Formula vitamin
- biotin
- MSM
- iron
- EVOO
- jojoba oil

These aren't shopping items but I would add no heat styling, letting your hair air dry, daily cardio exercise + drinking about a gallon of filtered water.

YMMV!

queenofheartz44
July 29th, 2013, 02:01 AM
Hair teas have really been helping me lately also a horn comb and boars bristle brush. For me i dont do the shampoo anymore but you can try some shampoo bars if you do. Also oils are wonderful for hair. Good luck and happy shopping
What do hair teas consist of Never heard of them, then again there is a lot I haven't heard of when it comes to hair :)

Try a horn comb, and some coconut oil. Clarify your hair with either SLS shampoo or I have heard baking soda works, to start fresh with whatever products you choose. Use them for a while to see what is effective. Don't buy a million things at once so you can't tell what is working and what is not.
I've seem stuff for horn combs, plastic combs and wooden combs. Do they really matter what the combs are made out of? Whats the benefit of a horn comb over the others?

For me, healthy hair has been as much about getting rid of stuff as getting new stuff.

- Stop using your sulfate-based shampoo. You can replace it with conditioner-only washing, a sulfate-free shampoo, or shampoo bars.
- Stop using your conditioner and styling products with silicones in them. Replace them with 'cone-free conditioners from this list (http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=2216).
- Avoid using your blow dryer, curling iron, hot curlers, and flat iron.
- If you have curly or frizzy hair, stop using your terry cloth towel and dry your hair with t-shirts or a smooth microfiber towel instead.
- Then invest in coconut or sweet almond oil, apple cider vinegar, and one or two SheaMoisture or Kinky-Curly products.
What is wrong with silicones? Is it because they are artificial?

queenofheartz44
July 29th, 2013, 02:26 AM
Thank you! I was told at salons that my hair is really healthy but to focus more towards the ends. I was so worried about the rest I forgot the ends!

queenofheartz44
July 29th, 2013, 02:30 AM
Is there a trick for applying leave-in conditioners? Mine is always like water (not sure if they are all like that) and I can never seem to apply it right. I try squirting in my hair, in my hand and no go. I end up making a mess with it. Should I just get a spray bottle for them or no?

tigereye
July 29th, 2013, 02:52 AM
I could tell you my necessities, but you would need to try things yourself.

Tangle teazer
BBB
Seamless comb (not for detangling - my hair will break - I use mine for styling)
SLS-free shampoo, cone-free condish (Im allergic to SLS)
Coconut oil (night before washing)
Nightbloomings Panacea
Scrunchies
My hair-toy collection.

tigereye
July 29th, 2013, 06:43 AM
Is there a trick for applying leave-in conditioners? Mine is always like water (not sure if they are all like that) and I can never seem to apply it right. I try squirting in my hair, in my hand and no go. I end up making a mess with it. Should I just get a spray bottle for them or no?

I would maybe suggest getting a small spray bottle and dissolving it in some more water - the watery ones tend to spread more evenly that way. Also, only apply from the chin/shoulder down. (My scalp doesn't need it - with a week between washes, my scalp hair gets enough moisturising as it is)
I use Nightbloomings panacea, which is much thicker, and possibly harder to spread evenly if you find the watery ones difficult, but I find it also dissolves quite well if you would want to use the spray bottle method with it.
The important thing to note with any of them is to avoid over-using it, since it can just end up looking a mess. I have hip-length hair now, and I use less than a pea-sized amount of panacea. With the thinner ones I have previously tried, I don't even need a full-pumps worth - that dissolved in water would last me two washes at waist. If your hair is shorter, you really don't need that much, especially since your scalp doesn't need it, and indeed, can rebel against it.

chen bao jun
July 29th, 2013, 07:26 AM
Head over to Long Hair Care Forum if you intend to keep relaxing. There are annoying things (to me) about that forum (product junkies, endless discussions on whether or not ethnic hair types grow long that get belligerent) but they are experts on relaxing and retaining growth. There is a 'healthy relaxed hair' thread.
I quit relaxing 13 years ago and am never going back, personally, but to each their own. If you ever decide to quit, 'curly girl' by Lorraine Massey is a great resource and also there is Terri LaFlesh (I might have spelled that wrong) with what is called the 'tightly curly method', I do a blend of the two.
Growing out the relaxer is a serious pain, that was by far the worst part, but otherwise its great over here on the 'curly' side.

Firefox7275
July 29th, 2013, 07:51 AM
Is there a trick for applying leave-in conditioners? Mine is always like water (not sure if they are all like that) and I can never seem to apply it right. I try squirting in my hair, in my hand and no go. I end up making a mess with it. Should I just get a spray bottle for them or no?

Anything that works in a spray bottle or is very watery is not a true conditioner IMO, it's more likely a detangler (water and silicones) or possibly a 'moisturiser' (water and humectants). True conditioners are rich in the major emollients (fatty alcohols and/ or cationic surfactants), these are creamy and fairly thick. Don't trust the descriptions or advertising straplines on products, read the ingredients and choose your products accordingly. I've seen many products claiming to be 'deep' or 'repairing' when they contain nothing that will penetrate just the most basic cheap ingredients.
http://www.naturallycurly.com/curlreading/celebrities/ingredients-commonly-found-in-hair-care-products

I used to rely on a spray leave in 'conditioner', when I finally got around to reading all the ingredients on my products I realised all I'd been using was wall-to-wall silicones, no emollients, natural oils, little protein and so on. Like yours my hair is chemical treated so needs some of the lost proteins and oils replacing, ingredients that will patch over damage and confer strength and protection. There is no such thing as healthy chemical treated hair, the damage is always there and can be seen under a microscope or tested for in a lab, even if it's not visible to the naked eye when hair is styled. My hair was always a mess because I was fighting my waves/ curls, but it never looked straw like or fried despite being damaged (breakage due to the 24/7 ponytail, very porous, velcro ends if not trimmed regularly), still did feel soft and have some shine due to the silicones.

I'm not saying silicones are 'bad' for everyone they absolutely have their place within a balanced regime alongside other ingredients that penetrate or 'nourish'. But if you heat style the chances are you are using a silicone heavy heat protection product, you don't want your leave in conditioner to be little more than water and silicones too. Many people successfully use their wash out conditioner as a leave in conditioner too, if it's a quality product with beneficial ingredients why not make better use of it instead of washing it all down the drain?

queenofheartz44
July 29th, 2013, 03:18 PM
I tend to leave a bit of conditioner in my hair after washing, I heard its good to moisturize and combat frizzies. Sometimes I'll squeeze out as much water as I can and then apply a little bit of conditioner to the ends.

queenofheartz44
July 29th, 2013, 03:20 PM
I tend to leave a bit of conditioner in my hair after washing, I heard its good to moisturize and combat frizzies. Sometimes I'll squeeze out as much water as I can and then apply a little bit of conditioner to the ends. That list is so daunting, how do you remember them all? Should I just print it all out?

starlamelissa
July 29th, 2013, 08:16 PM
First of all, are your current products bothering you? What are you looking for that you aren't getting from what you have?

BambooBeauty
July 29th, 2013, 09:24 PM
I would start simple. I really think tangle teaser is a good investment. A good conditioner ( I like hello hydration, aussie moist) and a couple different oils to try( coconut, jojoba my favorite being olive). I really like spin pins for buns.

queenofheartz44
July 29th, 2013, 09:59 PM
I'm a little leery on the shampoo I have, the Mane n' Tail original formula, just not sure if I like the way it feels. Also this is really my first official attempt to grow my hair past its current length (I always chop it off), so I'm just looking for pointers on growing it out.

Maktub
July 29th, 2013, 10:02 PM
Everyone is different... but here are my essentials, after a few years of testing around for the most natural and best way to take care of my hair:

Wood comb to detangle (I love : http://www.thebodyshop.ca/en/hair-care-products/hair-top-rated/detangling-comb.aspx)
Shikakai to clean, detangle, promote growth and condition hair (Mine comes from, I highly recommend : http://www.hennasooq.com/shikakai/)
Oil for sun protection, sceal moisture and for deep treatments before wash (I use this one : http://www.iherb.com/Artisana-100-Organic-Raw-Coconut-Oil-Extra-Virgin-16-fl-oz-473-ml/27183)
Real silk to sleep on, I use a sleep bonnet (Mine comes from, I highly recommend : http://www.etsy.com/shop/AdorabellaBaby?ref=pr_shop_more)
Sharp hair scissors for regular trims and S & D (to use only for that)
Ways to keep hair up in protective styles so as to reduce future damage (ex. hair sticks, forks, silk scrunchies, etc.)


And the rest is the best diet possible, exercice, benin neglect ... and patience !

queenofheartz44
July 29th, 2013, 11:23 PM
Thank you so much everyone for the awesome responses! It's really cool seeing all the different essentials people use and seeing how many of them line up with each other. :) So excited for my hair journey!

nanea
July 29th, 2013, 11:53 PM
Definitely recommend a bone comb of some sort. (I got mine from hairsense.com and they are seamless)
Jojoba oil or coconut oil (My oil of choice is the Monoi Vanilla oil. It smells divine! :D)
Lots of moisturizing conditioner (Thicker ones tend to work best for me. I use the biolage conditioning balm and it is amazing.)
A silicone free conditioner if you are doing the CO method (I do that and it keeps my hair very moisturized) or a sulfate free or gentle shampoo if you plan to shampoo still.

A little tip. Invest in a type of conditioner based on your hair's needs. If it is more on the dry side, get a moisturizing conditioner. If your hair lacks a bit of protein, invest in a protein conditioner. (Mane n tail is an excellent protein conditioner. My hair loves moisture more than protein though.) Careful though as too much protein can cause your hair to dry and or break. You want a good balance of both moisture and protein for your hair to keep it in a happy and healthy state. Once a month I will egg bomb my hair and it does wonders. :D Don't forget to trim as well to keep your ends in good shape. :)

Happy growing. Hope my meager tips helped in a way? :cheese:

Maktub
July 30th, 2013, 01:50 AM
I know you want to keep straitening, and that is very okay ! But THE most important thing that I ever did that really changed noticebly my hair quality was acceptance and working WITH my natural hair rather than against it. Finding inspiration in gorgeous long natural curly dream hair which had a similar texture than mine really helped for that !

ex.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-qFyDMEj1Sk
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1JO6GgVP7xw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rD3dc1Jw2qk&feature=c4-overview&list=UUgE3VfM7Eu3MDmy-5AKtIZA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LycKEqdJH1I
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DwAZudH3XA8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7GwtYzeawws
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fk_5Lqyj4qQ
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MybqjIeFeKQ

starlamelissa
July 30th, 2013, 05:26 AM
I think things that keep your hair up will help even if you only wear it up at night. if your hair is too short to wear up, a satin pillowcase can help alot to reducing tangles/damage.Also a wide tooth comb, and increased awareness of it rubbing against chairs/getting stuck under your purse strap. It's the little things that build up to big damage.

Mane n tail is pretty basic, deep cleansing shampoo. Maybe alternate with a moisturizing shampoo and see if you like that. I use suave professionals sleek or tresseme vitamin e shampoo for a conditioning wash.

Hootenanny
July 30th, 2013, 10:08 AM
I would second the recommendation for a more moisturizing shampoo. The Shea Moisture lines (esp. the Moisture Retention line) are excellent for both natural and relaxed curlies, and they're easy to find in most drugstores. I'm a 3B (natural) curly, and I <3 Shea Moisture. They aren't pricey either, so it can't hurt to give one of their shampoos a try! :)

Emichiee
July 30th, 2013, 01:49 PM
I like to see it as "preserving the hairs virgin state".
So the closer your ends match your new growth, the better.
For that I like:

1. Gentle, SLS free shampoo (Aubrey Organics or Earthly Delight), Silicone free conditioner.
2. Camellia Oil or Coconut Oil.
3. Wooden hair comb (LeBaoLong makes very smooth combs!)
4. Good quality claw clips for sleeping with a top knot (don't like caps cause I still would be sleeping on a bulk of hair).
5. Baking Soda works for clarifying
6. Sharp scissors to keep up frequent S&D so it never gets too overwhelming (every 2-3 weeks perhaps)
7. A great diet with lots of nutrient rich foods like lots of veggies, fruit and meat and less empty calories from some very high carb foods.
8. I take certain vitamins and minerals as supplements. It is not always possible to get all from foods that aren't as nutrient dense anymore and from less mineral rich soils than used to be. Some people have a malabsorption issue going on too. So I do take a multi, some minerals and supplements that I find important or tend to lack (Vit. d3, iron)
8. A very good hair fork (I like 60th street)


- My favorites atm :)

I also don't use heat, dye or any styling products. I do wear it down every four days or so, other times braided or in some sort of updo.

Neecola
July 31st, 2013, 01:18 PM
I know you want to keep straitening, and that is very okay ! But THE most important thing that I ever did that really changed noticebly my hair quality was acceptance and working WITH my natural hair rather than against it. Finding inspiration in gorgeous long natural curly dream hair which had a similar texture than mine really helped for that !

ex.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-qFyDMEj1Sk
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1JO6GgVP7xw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rD3dc1Jw2qk&feature=c4-overview&list=UUgE3VfM7Eu3MDmy-5AKtIZA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LycKEqdJH1I
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DwAZudH3XA8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7GwtYzeawws
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fk_5Lqyj4qQ
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MybqjIeFeKQ

Nice collection of videos! Lots of curly inspiration there :crush:

queenofheartz44
July 31st, 2013, 03:20 PM
They do help, thank you so much! I'm on the verge of firing my shampoo right now.

queenofheartz44
July 31st, 2013, 03:22 PM
Haha! The shampoo is on the verge of being fired. I tend to glare at it as I wash now...not a healthy shampoo relationship.

queenofheartz44
July 31st, 2013, 03:24 PM
I know you want to keep straitening, and that is very okay ! But THE most important thing that I ever did that really changed noticebly my hair quality was acceptance and working WITH my natural hair rather than against it. Finding inspiration in gorgeous long natural curly dream hair which had a similar texture than mine really helped for that !

ex.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-qFyDMEj1Sk
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1JO6GgVP7xw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rD3dc1Jw2qk&feature=c4-overview&list=UUgE3VfM7Eu3MDmy-5AKtIZA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LycKEqdJH1I
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DwAZudH3XA8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7GwtYzeawws
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fk_5Lqyj4qQ
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MybqjIeFeKQ

Thank you so much for the time you took to pull videos! I've seen a couple of them and really love them. :)

Nice collection of videos! Lots of curly inspiration there :crush:
I second that!

Vrindi
July 31st, 2013, 03:56 PM
Go ahead and get started on the hair toy addiction ;P Enabler! hehe

My first purchases were a wide tooth seamless comb (mine is bamboo) and coconut oil. I'd been doing sulfate shampoo already, but the shampoo/condish you use is totally up to what works for your hair type. Like others have said, try one new product at a time so if something doesn't work, you know which thing it was. Keep a notebook/journal to track what works and doesn't.

And have fun! :D

queenofheartz44
July 31st, 2013, 04:04 PM
I've seen some of the pretty hair toys, I'm still trying to figure out how to work them when I get my hands on them. Some of the styles looks so difficult! I'm sure practice will make perfect but I wonder if i'll end up giving up with a rats nest on my head after "attempts" ;) I have this "Nature fusion" (I think that's what it called) by Pantene PRO-V and well my hair seems to like it a bit more than the Mane n' Tail. The conditioner seems fine though, which is good, but I switch with a bottle of TREsemme anti-breakage (again i'm guessing the name :) )

Medievalmaniac
July 31st, 2013, 06:25 PM
Everyone has given you such good advice in terms of hair products and accessories to use, so I am going to give you advice on the OTHER things you need to be buying (and consuming!) for better hair:

dark, leafy greens: spinach, kale, broccoli, romaine
Bright, colorful veggies: red, yellow, green and orange peppers, carrots, cucumbers, tomatoes (not really a veggie but we put it there anyhow), red cabbage, beans, peas, corn
avocadoes (2 a week is good)
fresh fruits, especially blueberries and bananas, but also melons, apples, pears, peaches, plums, oranges, grapefruits, pineapple

flaxseeds, flaxseed oil, or a flaxseed bread

Jello, or gelatin prepared some other way

Cook with olive oil whenever possible

If you are not a vegan/vegetarian, then eating fish once or twice a week, or taking fish oil capsules, is one of the best things you can do for your hair. Ditto eggs, for the proteins.

A good hair, skin, and nails supplement (especially if you don't like Jello, lol)

And, of course, drink your water!!!

All the hair-care products in the world won't make up for a well-rounded, healthy, plants-based diet. I saw IMMEDIATE results after a week of eating "clean" -- and my hair and nails are much, much stronger. :flower:

Neecola
August 1st, 2013, 10:05 AM
^ Fantastic advice, Medievalmaniac!

queenofheartz44
August 1st, 2013, 03:38 PM
^ Fantastic advice, Medievalmaniac!


Everyone has given you such good advice in terms of hair products and accessories to use, so I am going to give you advice on the OTHER things you need to be buying (and consuming!) for better hair:

dark, leafy greens: spinach, kale, broccoli, romaine
Bright, colorful veggies: red, yellow, green and orange peppers, carrots, cucumbers, tomatoes (not really a veggie but we put it there anyhow), red cabbage, beans, peas, corn
avocadoes (2 a week is good)
fresh fruits, especially blueberries and bananas, but also melons, apples, pears, peaches, plums, oranges, grapefruits, pineapple

flaxseeds, flaxseed oil, or a flaxseed bread

Jello, or gelatin prepared some other way

Cook with olive oil whenever possible

If you are not a vegan/vegetarian, then eating fish once or twice a week, or taking fish oil capsules, is one of the best things you can do for your hair. Ditto eggs, for the proteins.

A good hair, skin, and nails supplement (especially if you don't like Jello, lol)

And, of course, drink your water!!!

All the hair-care products in the world won't make up for a well-rounded, healthy, plants-based diet. I saw IMMEDIATE results after a week of eating "clean" -- and my hair and nails are much, much stronger. :flower:

I heart salads so I have that bit covered :D I do need to work on my water intake I always try to drink more water and generally keep it up pretty good for a week or two before reverting to coffee and/or soda. I've limited my soda intake quite a bit though so that's a good. I don't think I'll fully cut it out because I really do love the taste of it. I've tried drinking flavored carbonated water like la croix and it doesn't work for me. I like the sweet flavor of soda too much.

Jello? I quite like jello but what does it have to do what healthy hair/eating? Oh and I'm a dedicated meat-eater so that's covered as well :p

Medievalmaniac
August 1st, 2013, 04:13 PM
Jello has gelatin in it, and gelatin is good for hair growth. :) :flower:

queenofheartz44
August 1st, 2013, 06:23 PM
Oh wow I didn't know that! We have a ton of jello around here, guess I'll be making some up now.

Princess Woolyb
August 1st, 2013, 06:59 PM
I second the diet also if it hasn't been said, henna has done amazing things for my hair and it does relax hair just a smidge