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Flame3345
July 8th, 2013, 06:14 AM
Hey everyone^^ I've been whipping my hair back and forth everytime I've finished washing it, and it really helps with drying my hair. (Normally when I just leave it alone, it takes 2-4 hours to dry, and my hair is still short :O But when I whip it around, then it only takes like 5-10 minutes to get 90-95% dry) It works really well with my hair, but I'm just curious whether or not it damages the hair? (I mean, it's not like it's manupulation, because I'm not touching it with my fingers ^^) Feel free to answer everyone, your thoughts, opinions, and experiences :D

Firefox7275
July 8th, 2013, 06:32 AM
Potential to stretch it in its weakened state, also strands rubbing against strand. Probably not a massive deal on short hair tho. Why don't you gently blot with a microfibre or flour sack towel or cotton t-shirt?

FireFromWithin
July 8th, 2013, 06:43 AM
I think the main problem would be tangles. If I flip my hair around, especially when wet it tangles terribly but other than that it should be fine I'd have thought

Kherome
July 8th, 2013, 06:52 AM
I wouldn't do it personally.

Flame3345
July 8th, 2013, 06:54 AM
Potential to stretch it in its weakened state, also strands rubbing against strand. Probably not a massive deal on short hair tho. Why don't you gently blot with a microfibre or flour sack towel or cotton t-shirt?

Thank you for your answer^^ Yes, that's the damage I'm afraid off :O I've tried those other methods too, but I just aren't sure which method is the most gentle on hair^^



I think the main problem would be tangles. If I flip my hair around, especially when wet it tangles terribly but other than that it should be fine I'd have thought

Thank you for your answer :) I always thought that my hair would tangle too if I just whipped it around, but surprisingly enough, it doesn't cause tangles in my hair, but I do use grapeseed oil on my hair and ends everytime I wash it and when I go to bed, so I guess it is protected from tangles^^ (If I don't use grapeseed oil, then I can't even brush through my hair when it's wet and drying :O)

I hope that it doesn't damage my hair, at least, because my hair seems to like this method :D (But I rarely find anything my hair "doesn't" like *shrugs*)

Flame3345
July 8th, 2013, 06:56 AM
I wouldn't do it personally.

Thank you for your opinion/answer ^^

jacqueline101
July 8th, 2013, 07:26 AM
Yes it does damage it.

Beborani
July 8th, 2013, 07:54 AM
You just reminded me that when I was young (traditional indian hair care) after blotting the hair with thin towel I used to whip it lightly with the towel (thin soft cotton) while holding the ends together to remove the debris of shikakai or chickpea flour that was used to wash the hair and itbwould get quite dry too during the process. I think I was taught this and it was pretty much the norm in my family where most girls have/had long thick hair. I think thick as in dense hair can withstand this tratment lot more than wispy and thin hair. We were never allowed to whip hair around but that is cultural.

sally_neuf
July 8th, 2013, 08:10 AM
sorry, what is whipping?
I don't rub it with a towel (!) But I make a little "turbant" keep it there for a couple of minutes and then headbang some water out!
Personally, I am at tailbone now and I can't see any damage from it

Firefox7275
July 8th, 2013, 08:16 AM
Thank you for your answer^^ Yes, that's the damage I'm afraid off :O I've tried those other methods too, but I just aren't sure which method is the most gentle on hair^^

Thank you for your answer :) I always thought that my hair would tangle too if I just whipped it around, but surprisingly enough, it doesn't cause tangles in my hair, but I do use grapeseed oil on my hair and ends everytime I wash it and when I go to bed, so I guess it is protected from tangles^^ (If I don't use grapeseed oil, then I can't even brush through my hair when it's wet and drying :O)

I hope that it doesn't damage my hair, at least, because my hair seems to like this method :D (But I rarely find anything my hair "doesn't" like *shrugs*)

Friction is damaging, be that brush against hair, hair against hair or towel against hair. Few of us here rub with the towel anyway, we blot turban or squeeze so limited friction the water is being taken out by capillary action. Any towel with fluffy fibres can ruffle the cuticle. I can imagine whipping long hair would not only cause tangles but stretch the hair nearer the roots due to the weight of the lengths plus water.

If you cannot brush your hair wet then comb it, but also maybe review at the ingredients and pH of your products? By all means oil your hair but it seems to me you are using that to substitute for adequate conditioning. Conditioner residues (ingredients like cationic surfactants, fatty alcohols, panthenol, hydrolysed protein) help protect the hair from friction/ mechanical damage and can patch repair. By all means use occlusives (oils and silicones) as well but not instead, you should not need to use a non penetrating oil so often.

PetuniaBlossom
July 8th, 2013, 10:04 AM
So glad you asked the question. I learned about 'whipping' the hair (headbanging) from watching this video by Habioku:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hoQbYQadjYo

Habioku is a member here. She has an amazing website with lots of great info and excellent tutorials. She has the most seriously beautiful and healthy hair I've ever seen.

So I've been doing the headbanging after washing for several months now and it has greatly shortened my drying time. Yay! It doesn't cause me any extra tangles nor any damage. My hair is approaching hip length, it's wurly, and virgin, with long blended layers which I'm growing out. If your hair type is different, damaged, etc., I can't say whether this technique would work for you. But I wouldn't be afraid to try it. Good luck. :flowers:

Flame3345
July 8th, 2013, 10:50 AM
Yes it does damage it.

Thank you for your opinion/answer :D


You just reminded me that when I was young (traditional indian hair care) after blotting the hair with thin towel I used to whip it lightly with the towel (thin soft cotton) while holding the ends together to remove the debris of shikakai or chickpea flour that was used to wash the hair and itbwould get quite dry too during the process. I think I was taught this and it was pretty much the norm in my family where most girls have/had long thick hair. I think thick as in dense hair can withstand this tratment lot more than wispy and thin hair. We were never allowed to whip hair around but that is cultural.

Thank you for your answer! ^^


sorry, what is whipping?
I don't rub it with a towel (!) But I make a little "turbant" keep it there for a couple of minutes and then headbang some water out!
Personally, I am at tailbone now and I can't see any damage from it

Thank you for your answer/opinion :D (I guess i meant headbanging^^ sorry) I think it's not damaging, as long as it's just headbanging it for a limited amount of time (to separate the hair strands so that it will dry faster)


Friction is damaging, be that brush against hair, hair against hair or towel against hair. Few of us here rub with the towel anyway, we blot turban or squeeze so limited friction the water is being taken out by capillary action. Any towel with fluffy fibres can ruffle the cuticle. I can imagine whipping long hair would not only cause tangles but stretch the hair nearer the roots due to the weight of the lengths plus water.

If you cannot brush your hair wet then comb it, but also maybe review at the ingredients and pH of your products? By all means oil your hair but it seems to me you are using that to substitute for adequate conditioning. Conditioner residues (ingredients like cationic surfactants, fatty alcohols, panthenol, hydrolysed protein) help protect the hair from friction/ mechanical damage and can patch repair. By all means use occlusives (oils and silicones) as well but not instead, you should not need to use a non penetrating oil so often.

Thank you for your answer and opinion :) When I think of it the way you just explained, then I definitely understand that it CAN be damaging :O I guess I should just dry it by squeezing out some excess water and then putting it up in a turban and then headbang the hair some, to separate the strands a bit, and then combing it gently so that I can leave it to dry by itself :D (I definitely wouldn't want to stretch my hair or cause friction to it) I do use conditioner^^ I CO-wash my hair everyday and use a VERY moisturizing conditioner every monday, when I use a shampoo. I use my grapeseed oil to seal in the moisture^^

woodswanderer
July 8th, 2013, 10:55 AM
I just squeeze mine grabbing at the nape and squeezing my way down. It's kind of like wringing it out, but I don't do any twisting. I have to do this a couple of times, usually waiting a minute in between for gravity to help. Whipping the hair sounds like it would make a mess in the bathroom to me.

Flame3345
July 8th, 2013, 10:57 AM
So glad you asked the question. I learned about 'whipping' the hair (headbanging) from watching this video by Habioku:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hoQbYQadjYo

Habioku is a member here. She has an amazing website with lots of great info and excellent tutorials. She has the most seriously beautiful and healthy hair I've ever seen.

So I've been doing the headbanging after washing for several months now and it has greatly shortened my drying time. Yay! It doesn't cause me any extra tangles nor any damage. My hair is approaching hip length, it's wurly, and virgin, with long blended layers which I'm growing out. If your hair type is different, damaged, etc., I can't say whether this technique would work for you. But I wouldn't be afraid to try it. Good luck. :flowers:

(I love her videos! :D)
(I guess it should have written "headbanging" :) ) Do you only headbang your hair? or do you allow your hair to dry on its own for some time? (like in Habioku's video^^)
I guess it doens't damage hair, as long as it's only used to separate the hair strands, so that the hair can dry faster! :D (My hair was quite static after only headbanging it instead of letting it dry on its own for some time :O ) Normally I use Habioku's method and my hair isn't static at all^^ (or at least only a "LITTLE")

Flame3345
July 8th, 2013, 10:59 AM
I just squeeze mine grabbing at the nape and squeezing my way down. It's kind of like wringing it out, but I don't do any twisting. I have to do this a couple of times, usually waiting a minute in between for gravity to help. Whipping the hair sounds like it would make a mess in the bathroom to me.

Thank you for your answer and opinion :D I've seen a few people use that method, but my hair isn't long enough (Yet :P) I'll definitely try it once it's longer^^

Firefox7275
July 8th, 2013, 11:08 AM
I do use conditioner^^ I CO-wash my hair everyday and use a VERY moisturizing conditioner every monday, when I use a shampoo. I use my grapeseed oil to seal in the moisture^^

You don't condition after the co-wash? If not that might be the issue, your co-wash product is a gentler replacement for shampoo, it's not intended to be a one step process, like shampoo and conditioner two in one. My hair is literally 'squeaky' clean when I have co-washed tho it's a softer squeak than shampoo, it's not conditioned but it is not stripped either. The Curly Girl method has two further conditioning steps after co-washing, obviously not suggesting everyone with wavy or curly hair wants or needs both.

I'm just wondering why you need a daily sealer when you have mid length hair that you are treating with respect.Also I don't understand what moisture you are sealing in if you apply the oil at night to dry hair or have I misunderstood? Really a moisturising conditioner plus occasional oiling/ good quality deep condition should be plenty. If your hair is drying in five to ten minutes after shaking the water out, then whatever products you have in at that point (conditioner) is not holding sufficient moisture - you don't need a neat oil for that, the basic ingredients of any decent conditioner (cationic surfactants and fatty alcohols) help the hair retain moisture.

Anje
July 8th, 2013, 11:16 AM
Well, not everyone needs a second heavier conditioner after CO washing. I never did -- it was a simple one-step process for me. More conditioning would have weighed things down, which isn't great when you're about 1c/F/ii. (Only reason I'm not doing it these days is that I cut bangs, and they seem to need a bit more stripping if I don't want them clumpy.)

OP, definitely try turbaning your hair if it's straightish. Blot gently or use a T-shirt to turban if you've got curlier hair that needs to be kept in clumps. Way less tangling, less risk of damage, and far more practical, especially as your hair gets longer. Even at my length, I could do some damage or knock things over from quite a large radius if I started headbanging to dry my hair on a regular basis. The water damage to the house alone would make it a poor choice in drying method!

ravenreed
July 8th, 2013, 11:18 AM
I use just one conditioner. I do follow everything with a catnip rinse, but I don't think it is conditioning, it just gives my hair slip so it doesn't tangle as much. I also don't oil regularly.

OP- When my hair was very short, I did the same thing. I wouldn't do it now because I would have water from one end of my house to another, and my hair would be one big tangle.


You don't condition after the co-wash? If not that might be the issue, your co-wash product is a gentler replacement for shampoo, it's not intended to be a one step process, like shampoo and conditioner two in one. My hair is literally 'squeaky' clean when I have co-washed tho it's a softer squeak than shampoo, it's not conditioned but it is not stripped either. The Curly Girl method has two further conditioning steps after co-washing, obviously not suggesting everyone with wavy or curly hair wants or needs both.

I'm just wondering why you need a daily sealer when you have mid length hair that you are treating with respect.Also I don't understand what moisture you are sealing in if you apply the oil at night to dry hair or have I misunderstood? Really a moisturising conditioner plus occasional oiling/ good quality deep condition should be plenty. If your hair is drying in five to ten minutes after shaking the water out, then whatever products you have in at that point (conditioner) is not holding sufficient moisture - you don't need a neat oil for that, the basic ingredients of any decent conditioner (cationic surfactants and fatty alcohols) help the hair retain moisture.

amanda_the_tall
July 8th, 2013, 01:26 PM
i'd recommend combing the knots out, then finger combing it. it helps get air in between the strands to make it dry faster. usually this results in less tangles, for me. and my hair *loves* tangles.

Flame3345
July 8th, 2013, 01:37 PM
You don't condition after the co-wash? If not that might be the issue, your co-wash product is a gentler replacement for shampoo, it's not intended to be a one step process, like shampoo and conditioner two in one. My hair is literally 'squeaky' clean when I have co-washed tho it's a softer squeak than shampoo, it's not conditioned but it is not stripped either. The Curly Girl method has two further conditioning steps after co-washing, obviously not suggesting everyone with wavy or curly hair wants or needs both.

I'm just wondering why you need a daily sealer when you have mid length hair that you are treating with respect.Also I don't understand what moisture you are sealing in if you apply the oil at night to dry hair or have I misunderstood? Really a moisturising conditioner plus occasional oiling/ good quality deep condition should be plenty. If your hair is drying in five to ten minutes after shaking the water out, then whatever products you have in at that point (conditioner) is not holding sufficient moisture - you don't need a neat oil for that, the basic ingredients of any decent conditioner (cationic surfactants and fatty alcohols) help the hair retain moisture.

Well, no I don't use a conditioner after CO-washing it, I use a moisturizing hair mask on the ends :D (I guess I'm afraid of it not having moisture)
I use a homemade leave-in conditioner that I've made of my most moisturizing conditioner and with a few drops of Rosemary and peppermint oil in it and then I use my grapeseed oil :D (My hair seems to love it^^) I use it on my after washing it and before going to bed (right before applying my oil)
I've just let my hair airdry (I was at the Beach earlier today, so I got home and Deep conditioned my hair and used my grapeseed oil. Earlier today after headbanging my head, my hair was pretty static, but right now (After letting it dry on its own, only headbanging it for a few seconds to separate the strands and then combing it through gently) my hair is incredibly soft and doesn't even have any static at all :D


Well, not everyone needs a second heavier conditioner after CO washing. I never did -- it was a simple one-step process for me. More conditioning would have weighed things down, which isn't great when you're about 1c/F/ii. (Only reason I'm not doing it these days is that I cut bangs, and they seem to need a bit more stripping if I don't want them clumpy.)

OP, definitely try turbaning your hair if it's straightish. Blot gently or use a T-shirt to turban if you've got curlier hair that needs to be kept in clumps. Way less tangling, less risk of damage, and far more practical, especially as your hair gets longer. Even at my length, I could do some damage or knock things over from quite a large radius if I started headbanging to dry my hair on a regular basis. The water damage to the house alone would make it a poor choice in drying method!

Thank you for your opinion and answer ^^ (I used the t-shirt turban method on my hair before doing my big chop and I really liked it :D But right now my hair is too short, so i can only use the towel turban method. :D But I'll definitely use the T-shirt method once my hair gets longer. Hehe, yes everything would get wet by headbanging VERY long hair :O


I use just one conditioner. I do follow everything with a catnip rinse, but I don't think it is conditioning, it just gives my hair slip so it doesn't tangle as much. I also don't oil regularly.

OP- When my hair was very short, I did the same thing. I wouldn't do it now because I would have water from one end of my house to another, and my hair would be one big tangle.

Thank you for your answer/opinion ^^ I definitely understand that :D

Flame3345
July 8th, 2013, 01:39 PM
i'd recommend combing the knots out, then finger combing it. it helps get air in between the strands to make it dry faster. usually this results in less tangles, for me. and my hair *loves* tangles.

Thank you for your answer and opinion :D I use finger combing somestimes before using my wide tooth comb ^^ (I haven't experienced tangles at ALL, ever since i started to use Grapeseed Oil on my hair everyday :D)

Bene
July 8th, 2013, 01:57 PM
For the life of me, I can not imagine whipping my hair back and forth as something I'd ever want to do. Do it long enough, you get dizzy, fall over, and that's a cracked skull in the ER that makes the triage nurse consider having you carted off to the psych ward for an evaluation.





Also, I hated that song/video. Especially when everyone assumed that just because I was doing the hair thing, that a "hair song" would be something I'd enjoy. Nevermind that it's a music genre I despise and child entertainers annoy me to no end.

Keepitgrowing31
July 8th, 2013, 02:09 PM
I would imagine it causes damage. Seeing as though whipping wet hair causes tangles which lead to knots which cause damage.

honeybunnie8
July 8th, 2013, 03:24 PM
It might..but I do it a few times to break up my hair after a shower anyway. I have fine hair and cant comb it while wet because it stretches and breaks. I dont get tangles or knots and I have WL hair.
Its not like I'm headbanging for an hour its just a few times to break up my hair so it dries faster.

AliD
July 8th, 2013, 06:41 PM
I have realized that letting my hair air dry a bit instead of combing it wet makes it much easier to comb

ravenreed
July 8th, 2013, 06:54 PM
Probably for the same reason I spin around in my office chair until I am dizzy. I am just silly that way. What song? I used to do it just because it was an effective way to get the water out of my hair without resorting to a blow dryer. I have never been a big fan of sitting under a blow dryer, even before LHC. I am far too impatient. The last time my hair was that short was probably the mid-80's, however.



For the life of me, I can not imagine whipping my hair back and forth as something I'd ever want to do. Do it long enough, you get dizzy, fall over, and that's a cracked skull in the ER that makes the triage nurse consider having you carted off to the psych ward for an evaluation.





Also, I hated that song/video. Especially when everyone assumed that just because I was doing the hair thing, that a "hair song" would be something I'd enjoy. Nevermind that it's a music genre I despise and child entertainers annoy me to no end.

majesticmoon
July 8th, 2013, 06:54 PM
i "headbang" too and i have damaged hair and i dont have tangles.

jennescence
July 8th, 2013, 07:01 PM
For a minute I thought you were joking lol. Yes it does absolutely damage it. Similar to how your hair would get wind damaged driving with the windows down in the car.

jennescence
July 8th, 2013, 07:03 PM
also maybe you should sit in front of a fan on low. thats what i do and it cuts drying time in half.

Flame3345
July 9th, 2013, 03:22 AM
Thank you everyone, for all of your great answers and opinions! ^^

sally_neuf
July 9th, 2013, 04:35 AM
Ohh ok so I had the right idea!:) Anyway, I just "headbang" two or three times to take water out, and I wash it twice a week, so 6 "bangs" a week... no damage for me. However, I have quite strong hair, maybe finer hair would tangle? or curly hair? mine definitely doesn't.
On a funny story: I had a friend who also use to have thick WL hair and do the same, one day she went pixie! and she wash her hair normally, and when she did the "headbang" woow! almost completely felt off! she used to lift that massive amount of wet heavy hair, and then she had almost nothing, so she put too much force and well.. felt out of balance!

PetuniaBlossom
July 9th, 2013, 05:58 AM
Ohh ok so I had the right idea!:) Anyway, I just "headbang" two or three times to take water out, and I wash it twice a week, so 6 "bangs" a week... no damage for me. However, I have quite strong hair, maybe finer hair would tangle? or curly hair? mine definitely doesn't.
On a funny story: I had a friend who also use to have thick WL hair and do the same, one day she went pixie! and she wash her hair normally, and when she did the "headbang" woow! almost completely felt off! she used to lift that massive amount of wet heavy hair, and then she had almost nothing, so she put too much force and well.. felt out of balance!

Ha! That's a funny story. I can just picture her almost falling over. It's like after a big chop I went to brush my hair and kept on brushing into thin air, long after the hair ended.

woolyleprechaun
July 9th, 2013, 06:59 AM
Ummmm.... I really wouldn't do that. A soft t-shirt is a good drying tool :) 'plopping' with a shirt gives me nice, soft, well defined waves (well, those weird sausage dread waves my hair likes to make). Probs worth a try!

Dorothy
July 9th, 2013, 07:13 AM
I wash, condition, rinse, vinegar, rinse, then squeeze down the length (no twisting) in the back. At this point, my hair is one long mass headed straight down my spine. But I don't want it there, so I whip gently 3 times, which makes it all go upward without tangling it, then fingercomb camellia nut oil in while I'm upside down, then damp bun for that to soak in.
After about 1/2 hour, I either go straight to bed and undo the bun over the end of the bed, or I fingercomb then widetooth seamless comb, part it, comb it down, gently whip once or twice to fan the strands, and sit under a ceiling fan.

Frankly, I don't believe this amount of gentle whipping is bad for my hair, I think a lot more damage happens every time I comb it up dry and put it in a bun. That takes a lot of combing. The whipping is not like headbanging, which from my observations is a little more violent, I don't do it hard enough to tip over and risk ER visits, it's very gentle. More like flipping than whipping. My hair is straight and slippery, and I'm holding at waist to thicken my ends.

I think there are worse things I could do. There's more friction involved in braiding, and I lose more hair in that process.

StephanieP3
July 9th, 2013, 04:03 PM
Okay, 2 questions, is playing with my hair a lot when it's drying bad? (not playing as in twisting and brushing and causing damage, but touching it a lot) And what is plopping?

biogirl87
July 9th, 2013, 05:00 PM
Stephanie, I don't think touching your hair a lot while it's drying will cause damage. Touching your hair while it's drying can cause frizz if your hair is curly. As I understand it, plopping is another way of towel turbaning your hair (don't know if that a word though). Basically when you're plopping your hair, you lay a towel or a T-shirt on a flat surface, put your head/hair on the towel and than after putting the rest of towel over your head, tie the towel around your head to decrease drying time and not have to rub your hair (which was how I'd towel dry my hair before getting out of the shower on wash days in my teens). I probably haven't explained it clearly but then again I haven't done it a lot as for me (2b hair type) plopping just causes frizz. Seems it only works for "real, 3/4 hair type" curlies. Maybe the curly members on this forum can explain this better.

Firefox7275
July 10th, 2013, 08:41 PM
Okay, 2 questions, is playing with my hair a lot when it's drying bad? (not playing as in twisting and brushing and causing damage, but touching it a lot) And what is plopping?

Yes it can be damaging: hair is particularly weak and vulnerable when wet. I used to finger comb my ponytail whilst it was drying, after a few months of that my hair started breaking off. Touching can also cause frizz in wavy or curly hair.

See YouTube for plopping videos: works for plenty of type 2 wavies on curly hair forums, doesn't always work for those with shorter hair tho. I'm not that keen because instead of neat ringlets I get curls that rotate one way and then reverse but it doesn't cause frizz with the right products and timing. I prefer scrunching out the excess water with my flour sack towel but still plop when it's more convenient to do so.

ExpectoPatronum
July 10th, 2013, 09:21 PM
As someone who actually wants to be an astronaut, I found this to be immensely interesting to watch! I wonder how much I would hate having long hair if I was up in the ISS...

ExpectoPatronum
July 10th, 2013, 09:26 PM
Ahhh I had the wrong reply window open to the wrong thread! I feel like a dunce.

TheMechaGinger
July 11th, 2013, 09:53 AM
I do this all the time! When I get out of the shower I squish the extra water out (no twisting) and then I wrap it all up in a 3XL t-shirt for a few minutes to soak up some extra moisture. After that I take it down, gently detangle, and add in my serum. Once I'm done applying serum I bend over at the waist and whip my hair around a few times! It's like a little post-shower headbanging party. I use a lot of cones so there's hardly any friction between the strands. I find it separates the large clumps of hair that form from being wet and dries much much faster for me because everything is separated. I don't notice any damage from this and I've been doing it this way for about 2 years now

swearnsue
July 11th, 2013, 11:14 AM
I bend at the waist and gently whip/shake my hair downward before I wrap in a turban. I don't whip it around to get it to dry faster. My hair is thin and I live in an area with about 6% humidity. Besides I think if I whipped wet hair around it would scare my cat.

Emichiee
July 11th, 2013, 03:38 PM
I headbang to dry my hair all the time (in circles), I think that is what you mean.
It doesn't cause more friction than wind, but since the hair is spun in a circle, gravitating away from you head, I don't see how it could cause major damage.
I did it years ago with 0 damage and splits, and then when my health worsened and I started getting more splits and weakened hair it still did not contribute to any more damage.
It is also a quick and gentle way to detangle. I would cause more "damage" detangling with a comb. After headbanging my hair is a good as combed.
Healthy hair is more resilient than one thinks and will withstand minor combing, handling and hairdos. If hair is so brittle that it breaks at the slightest touch, something else is at play.

panffle
July 11th, 2013, 04:30 PM
I do that 2-4 times after I wash my hair. I have fine hair and get no tangles whatsoever from doing it, and I haven't seen any damage either. Not to mention it cuts down the drying time to almost half, and since I wash my hair at night it's a lot better than not whipping the hair and then using a blow drier (mine doesn't have a cold setting).

Flame3345
July 12th, 2013, 03:34 AM
Thank you so much everyone, for all of your answers / experiences and opinions! :D (I really appreciate it ^^)

Tristania
July 12th, 2013, 04:59 AM
I believe any manipulation of wet hair is damaging, which is why I even wash my hair with my head upside-down so as to not move my hair too much while I get my scalp clean.