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rowie
April 12th, 2013, 11:46 AM
Okay pardon me, but Google and the search bar is not working for me today. :( I would like to wear my hair in a single English braid everyday. This is appealing to me because some people say that they have grown down to calf length just by simply wearing hair in one single braid everyday. I don't know if that is a myth, but it's hard not to believe when I saw a pretty old woman at Walmart wearing a single braid as long as classic length. Is it a good idea to do so?

I am a daily bun wearer and I'd like to look for a more simple routine (if simplicity exists). I don't like changing my hair style everyday, even though it is recommended, and so far I haven't had any problems with my everyday nautilus bun. I just want a simple routine I can do to protect my ends to give my expensive hair toys a break, and also because i'm at a length where I can't do pin-less buns at the moment. I know it's different for every hair type, and the point of this thread is to observe what the "general" consensus of opinions are when it comes to "braids vs. buns."

What worries me about single braids:

1) I can really feel some of the shorter ends sticking out hitting my back and so friction is an issue. But will that friction damage those exposed hairs hitting my shirt all day?

2) If you don't tie the braid right it can encourage fairy tale ends. I've heard you need a pantyhose material to tie the ends with or something silky or silicone? Or tie it at different lengths everyday?

Similarly for buns:

1) wearing it at the same spot will cause breakage, and you need to shift it during the day to balance stress points. (This is a lot of work for me on a busy day).

2) you have to be careful with the placing of sticks, forks, in order to as much avoid hair snapping if you are the type that likes to weave in these tools.

What are your thoughts? Which causes more damage a bun or a braid? Do you like to braid your hair everyday or bun your hair?

Kaelee
April 12th, 2013, 11:49 AM
Right now I'm trying to mix it up. I'm currently wearing a folded braid, sometimes I wear an English braid down my back, or a bun. As I learn more styles I can mix it up even more. Some days I find my hair just will not do whatever it is I want it to do and I have to resort to something else.

rowie
April 12th, 2013, 11:52 AM
Right now I'm trying to mix it up. I'm currently wearing a folded braid, sometimes I wear an English braid down my back, or a bun. As I learn more styles I can mix it up even more. Some days I find my hair just will not do whatever it is I want it to do and I have to resort to something else.

On those days where you wear your hair in a single English braid, have you had any issues with friction or breakage to your ends?

rowie
April 12th, 2013, 12:05 PM
I'm starting to think that maybe at different lengths it might be different. Like I've heard some people say that what worked was the single braid down the back helped him or her get through the evil phase of BSL and MBL abyss, but bunning will come in handy at classic and beyond. Or maybe their is a technique i'm missing when it comes to braiding such as oiling the braid. hmmmmmm i've got my thinking caps on but so far I haven't found an answer I like. hehehe

BambooBeauty
April 12th, 2013, 12:12 PM
i wear my hair in a french braid daily. i usuall put some oil in my the length. I tie the briad off with a pony tail holder i made from panty hose and then the remaining hair from the holder down I coat with oil to 'seal' my ends. I dont have any breakage.

meteor
April 12th, 2013, 12:13 PM
You can grow as long as you want with braids! However, I find that at hip+ braiding just takes longer than bunning, even if you are fast. When I joined LHC I couldn't do any buns (but I braided a lot) and updos always hurt my head and were extremely awkward and uncomfortable, but now I got used to them and I love them! I don't see any difference in protective quality between buns and braids, except you get to tuck ends with buns and your hair is less likely to be caught on chairs, etc.
I really love braids because they show thickness and length while protecting hair.

neko_kawaii
April 12th, 2013, 12:34 PM
I find at BCL it is much faster to bun than to braid and that a loose braid ends up flopping around and getting in the way more at this length, so those factors and an effort to minimize damage from hair ties leads me to mostly bun, but my scalp complains if I exclusively bun so sometimes I wear a braid to sleep or during the day.

I'd say you can certainly grow to any length with no style other than a braid, just be aware of how you tie it off as you said to minimize thinning of the ends.

blondie9912
April 12th, 2013, 12:42 PM
I think for very long hair (hip+) buns would be much better because your ends are protected. For finer hair especially, braids are kind of risky, because I do feel that the shorter hairs that stick out around my neck/crown get damaged from friction when in a braid.

LadyCelestina
April 12th, 2013, 12:43 PM
I think unless you do something crazy with the braid tassel,it's quite possible.

Panth
April 12th, 2013, 01:14 PM
This:


You can grow as long as you want with braids!

I'd say you can certainly grow to any length with no style other than a braid, just be aware of how you tie it off as you said to minimize thinning of the ends.

is certainly not true for me. Past TBL, I cannot gain any more length without daily bunning. Once I start to sit on my hair, the extra wear and tear means the bottom wears off as fast as the top grows in.

Whether this is true for you ... you'll just have to find out. However, certainly for some people and particularly and more extreme lengths, buns and plaits are not equally protective.

(Btw, I wear a low English plait cinnabunned every day and have for about 1.5 years. Same style, same spot on the head, no problem. I've grown to knee and am still going, despite having fine hair. I think the whole thing about changing styles and moving the style around your head is ... over-rated. Yes, I have nape breakage, but that's from having to wear a cycle helmet, not from wearing the same bun every day.)

ladyfey
April 12th, 2013, 01:36 PM
My hair is mid-calf and a braid just doesn't work for me. It is too in the way and gets way too much damage that way, it also ends up really tangly for some reason. Buns all the way for me. However, if your hair is waist or shorter, I'd think braids would be okay.

kaydana
April 12th, 2013, 01:44 PM
If you want to wear an english braid every day and are worried about damage, try making a paranda. One made out of a silky fabric or ribbon would be gentle against your hair and will protect the ends, as well as offering some protection to the hair in the braid from rubbing against stuff. You make them longer than your hair so all of the hair is in the braid and the tassel is just the paranda.

LakeofGlass
April 12th, 2013, 02:31 PM
I agree with Kaydana. The paranda/parandi is lovely. I use recycled sari silk, which is very soft. You can also use a hair fork or hair stick if you want to keep it in a bun yet not use a hair tie to secure it. This is what I've been doing. If you want to go out or stay at home and not do much to your hair, an idea would be using a hair scarf. It's good for those quick moments. I'd seen a few cute ideas from Super Kawaii Mama (a vintage-loving hair and beauty blogger). She has 2 videos on tying scarves and each one is both cute and elegant.

Personally I don't see a need to choose between the two. I love a good variety! It keeps the fun of having long hair alive. One week I may opt for variations of a braided bun, another week I may do mostly knotted buns, and here and there I may go for just a long braid if I'm at home. Layers end up giving me spikes.

rowie
April 12th, 2013, 02:35 PM
Thanks for the contribution so far! :flower: I hope other people will find this useful.

It's nice to hear that the two of you believe it is possible. There is one way to find out and that is to try. I just thought I could be more educated about it before I take the plunge. Plus I like to hear from you all! :)

You can grow as long as you want with braids! However, I find that at hip+ braiding just takes longer than bunning, even if you are fast. When I joined LHC I couldn't do any buns (but I braided a lot) and updos always hurt my head and were extremely awkward and uncomfortable, but now I got used to them and I love them! I don't see any difference in protective quality between buns and braids, except you get to tuck ends with buns and your hair is less likely to be caught on chairs, etc.
I really love braids because they show thickness and length while protecting hair.


I find at BCL it is much faster to bun than to braid and that a loose braid ends up flopping around and getting in the way more at this length, so those factors and an effort to minimize damage from hair ties leads me to mostly bun, but my scalp complains if I exclusively bun so sometimes I wear a braid to sleep or during the day.


I'd say you can certainly grow to any length with no style other than a braid, just be aware of how you tie it off as you said to minimize thinning of the ends.

I definitely will try the Paranda, but only when I have time. Hmmm it will take me awhile before I can venture into this realm. Time for me to visit the Paranda thread. :)

If you want to wear an english braid every day and are worried about damage, try making a paranda. One made out of a silky fabric or ribbon would be gentle against your hair and will protect the ends, as well as offering some protection to the hair in the braid from rubbing against stuff. You make them longer than your hair so all of the hair is in the braid and the tassel is just the paranda.

rowie
April 12th, 2013, 02:37 PM
I agree with Kaydana. The paranda/parandi is lovely. I use recycled sari silk, which is very soft. You can also use a hair fork or hair stick if you want to keep it in a bun yet not use a hair tie to secure it. This is what I've been doing. If you want to go out or stay at home and not do much to your hair, an idea would be using a hair scarf. It's good for those quick moments. I'd seen a few cute ideas from Super Kawaii Mama (a vintage-loving hair and beauty blogger). She has 2 videos on tying scarves and each one is both cute and elegant.

Personally I don't see a need to choose between the two. I love a good variety! It keeps the fun of having long hair alive. One week I may opt for variations of a braided bun, another week I may do mostly knotted buns, and here and there I may go for just a long braid if I'm at home. Layers end up giving me spikes.

Good Points! I'll have to maybe at least think about doing a different style at least when it is convenient for me to do so. I'm just bad at being lazy and I find detangling and collecting my sheds daily a task that takes a lot of my time on a daily basis.


This:




is certainly not true for me. Past TBL, I cannot gain any more length without daily bunning. Once I start to sit on my hair, the extra wear and tear means the bottom wears off as fast as the top grows in.

Whether this is true for you ... you'll just have to find out. However, certainly for some people and particularly and more extreme lengths, buns and plaits are not equally protective.

(Btw, I wear a low English plait cinnabunned every day and have for about 1.5 years. Same style, same spot on the head, no problem. I've grown to knee and am still going, despite having fine hair. I think the whole thing about changing styles and moving the style around your head is ... over-rated. Yes, I have nape breakage, but that's from having to wear a cycle helmet, not from wearing the same bun every day.)

Glad to hear that the shifting of buns is "over-rated." I have worn my hair in a nautilus bun everyday for the past four months. So if anything, I can always go back and stick to my current routine. Thanks for the other points you made. It gave me some new insights.:)

jacqueline101
April 12th, 2013, 04:23 PM
I've heard the same theory you have about wearing your hair in a braid. I also think a good braid would be easier to maintain.

LakeofGlass
April 12th, 2013, 04:43 PM
In the end, what people prefer best is what is easiest to maintain. I don't believe anyone desperately needs to use a braid vs a bun, or the reversed being true. A bun secured with a good hair stick or hair fork can stay up for hours. Personally I find that having a braid hanging down gets in my way if I'm exercising or cooking. If I'm just relaxing while watching tv or reading a book, a braid that isn't bunned won't bother me. Like I said, it's all about preference.

JadeTigress
April 12th, 2013, 05:07 PM
Sort of on the same track, I just twist my hair up and throw it in a claw clip every day. My hair's a couple inches from bsl, but I can't get any of my buns to hold because of all my layers. It'd take a million pins to maybe make it work. Damage-wise, would a braid be better than the wadded up claw clip thing every day? My layers stick out whether it's in a braid or a clip, so they're pretty much exposed no matter what.

Gumball
April 12th, 2013, 06:50 PM
I'm also a braided cinnabun wearer and I'm going strong. It's now what I do 75% of the time, with the other 20% generally being a nautilus. Okay there are exceptions where 5% might be something else like a banded ponytail when I feel like showing off the length, but keeping it contained.

I put the braided bun up with one stick and it stays all day. I avoid wearing a braid down for prolonged periods of time because I'm afflicted with a nasty case of Chia Braid exacerbated by wurly/curly hair.

Definite perk to a braided cinnabun: The braid is generally not fuzzy by the end of the day. I can then take the stick out, replace the loose hair tie with a scrunchie and I'm suddenly already prepped for bed! Win win! Stylish AND lazy. :D

Kherome
April 12th, 2013, 07:20 PM
Win win! Stylish AND lazy. :D

Indeed! An excellent combo.

arcane
April 12th, 2013, 07:46 PM
Personally I don't think about it that much. I know my hair and its corser and relatively thick and I don't tend to get mechanical damage. I generally put my hair up however; normally in a bun or a ponytail (even though LHC frowns on it, I have no damage from it and I wore my hair in a ponytail daily for about 4 years straight). I tend to only wear braids occasionally because I find my ends get fluffy (not the rest of the braid though) and they continue to look stupid till my next wash. And since I'm now at 7-10 days between washing I generally don't do braids.

I 100% don't believe that wearing hair a certain way garantees growth for everybody. Once your hair is out its dead. I think wearing it so it minimizes damage for you is the key to preserving ones length. And that style/styles is different for everybody. I had hipish length hair throughout my childhood that when I got up in the morning would be knotted into a bob, and that I only wore down. It's all about what your hair can take, I'm assured by that and my own adult knowledge of my hair that I don't have to treat my hair like fine lace (and tbh if I had too I'd keep my hair short, I have no patience). But some people do need to be more protective, and what that entails for them will probably be different from the next person too.

Natalia
April 12th, 2013, 08:10 PM
Im a bunner all the way. I like no fuss and braid are ALOT more fuss for me if they arent for you go with it :). My only 2 cents to add about the braid its that it gets more wear and tear unless your very careful and dilligent about moving it. Sitting, in the car, it swings around, had the potential to get caught in doors and such (yeah ive done it :p), gets sat on if long enough. My braids turn into a frizzy mess in under 2 hours even if i am careful with it. I get highly annoyed with anything that requires that much attention. With a bun i comb it once put it up and im done till i shower and go to bed. Everyone is different though.

jasper
April 12th, 2013, 08:35 PM
My hair is much safer in a bun now that my braid hangs so long. At tailbone length, I have a braid that finds its way into whatever task I am doing in the kitchen, in my garden, in the art studio. I was planting seeds and noticed my braid training in the dirt! Also, for me, a bun is usually going to last all day, but a braid will get fuzzy and need to be redone more than once.

Kaelee
April 12th, 2013, 10:16 PM
On those days where you wear your hair in a single English braid, have you had any issues with friction or breakage to your ends?

No, but I don't think I would if I only wear one every once in a while (say once a week). If I wore one every day I would think that I would, but if I'm having those issues after one day I'd think my hair needs help other than a styling!

Schnee
April 13th, 2013, 01:06 AM
I agree with those who say it doesn't have to be this or the other, variation is good fun! ;) I still wear a single english braid a lot and have ankelish hair now. If I damp braid and ligthly oil it won't fuzz much and it's easy to pin up at need. I've got some taper and damage now, but it's more because of post partum shedding and serious negelect from having twins. ;)

Panth
April 13th, 2013, 01:46 AM
Glad to hear that the shifting of buns is "over-rated." I have worn my hair in a nautilus bun everyday for the past four months. So if anything, I can always go back and stick to my current routine. Thanks for the other points you made. It gave me some new insights.:)

Personally, I think this is true of most "LHC lore". It's great for trouble-shooting, as everyone chimes in with an opinion that helped for them so you get lots of options, including really uncommon or obscure ones. It's terrible for designing a routine, because by default the net total of everyone's opinions = the most extreme, complicated, time-consuming, worry-wart sort of routine. You get a routine that might coax the most fragile hair to grow, or might enable you to reach floor-length, but is completely excessive for someone who is growing more average hair to more (LHC) average lengths (or even my fine hair to quite extreme lengths).

If I was you, I'd just keep doing what I was doing. I'd cut out stuff that seemed too fussy for me. Personally, that's: washing that is more complicated than S&C or oil shampoo, any other treatments, any supplements, any handling more complicated than once-daily combing and plaiting, any every-day hairstyles more complicated than a braided cinnabun or a nautilus, swapping hairstyles daily/more than daily, swapping where I start my bun, etc. I spend (comparatively) very little time on my hair. I also spend (comparatively) very little money on it. My main investment is the most important one: TIME.

Then, if you notice a problem, you can come here, troubleshoot and correct for it. With very long lengths it may take quite a while for the correction to make a difference, but personally I would take that over spending every waking moment faffing with my hair.

Long hair (just like short hair) can be all about fuss, money, fancy products and complicated routines. But it doesn't have to be. And, I'm pretty sure most of the classic+ people here have very simple routines. Benign neglect is a (very!) viable hair growing method.

(Of course, if you want it to be about fancy products, complicated routines and billions of hairstyles, it can be... that is also good, but only if you want it!)

auburntressed
April 13th, 2013, 04:19 AM
For me, my braids get fuzzy in about ten minutes if I don't pin them up. On the other hand, updos have a tendency to make already excruciating headaches even worse. I typically braid my hair and then pin it up with a hairstick. Then I will, at various times throughout my work day, unpin my braid for a while, let it hang over my shoulder, then eventually pin it back up. It spends more time up than down, but having the option to just let the braid down for a while without undoing my entire hairstyle can be really helpful.

If you're worried about friction from clothing, I'd suggest paying attention to what sort of fabrics your shirts and eventually pants are made from. If they feel soft, then you're probably fine leaving it in a braid. If your shirt feels pretty rough, then maybe pin it up that day. :) It's like an extension of the silk pillowcase thing.

Rainbow2911
April 14th, 2013, 03:57 PM
I always bun during the day as that is the least bother, least knotty thing to do with my hair once it's past waist. My little sister on the other hand, wears her hair in a tailbone length braid everyday, and only every buns for gymnastics practice. Our hair is pretty similar aside from colour but we find different things annoying I guess!

millyaulait
April 14th, 2013, 04:08 PM
If I'm not wearing it down then it's always bunned. :)

It's easy, keeps any hair away from my face/neck, no dangly bits for the cat to swipe at, etc.

The only thing I worry about from this is the possibility of traction alopecia (?????) simply because my bun is in the same place every day.

Sometimes it's tight (I try not to do it tight, but sometimes I can't get the balance right with my hair fork :\) so I worry about that tightness at the scalp and if it's going to eventually wreak havok on my hair.

Sharysa
April 14th, 2013, 06:11 PM
Braids are no problem for me, since my hair is pretty coarse and thick. If I try to bun my hair, it's going to weigh on my scalp a LOT and it slips out anyway after a few hours, but braids (especially side-braids) work much better for me since they stay in place all day and lie on my torso pretty calmly.

The only problem is if I try to do a single braid down the back, because that makes my nape hairs snarl up like whoa as opposed to the average/manageable tangles that side braids or twin braids cause.

No idea why that happens, but I'm sticking to side braids and twin braids. I got from shoulder/collarbone length to mid-back in a year, so braiding definitely works for me. One thing I noticed was that I like doing different KINDS of braids, so that probably helps mitigate the damage from tying it off at the same place all the time.

chen bao jun
April 16th, 2013, 08:41 PM
Try a braid; I think you'll see if you are getting damage and if so, you can stop. My thoughts (I only have like apl hair--barely--so they are just thoughts)--you have to take more care to protect your braid tassel than you do with hair in a bun. but it can be done. A more serious issue would be to be sure to be aware of situations in a which a braid would be more dangerous than a bun. Around machinery and so forth is a no-brainer (but its surprising how often people don't think of this. A kitchen, for instance can be a very dangerous place with loose very long hair or a long plait hanging down). You also probably want your hair up or kept inside a coat or shirt in dodgy neighborhoods or situations. It's not only a question of avoiding possible hair thieves or spiteful people (I'm not sure that's all that common) but a braid hanging loose can leave you very defenseless against someone who is not after your hair, if you catch my drift. Sorry to bring up an unpleasant subject,but its better to be safe than sorry.

ibleedlipstick
April 16th, 2013, 09:50 PM
Wear your hair the way you want to. If a braid is most convenient/comfortable, wear it in a braid. Wait a month or two, check your ends, and if you see damage then rethink your hair strategy. I don't really believe that wearing it in a braid instead of a bun is going to help you get to your goal length, but it probably won't hinder it. Hair grows differently for different people, and it will damage differently for different people. It all depends on your lifestyle.

Naiadryade
April 17th, 2013, 08:41 AM
For what it's worth, most of the people I've known IRL who have quite long hair (hip to classic, never known anyone longer) wear their hair in a single english braid almost exclusively. Except for one old woman with hip-length hair, who always always always wears her hair in two english braids. (The silver fades into blonde at the ends, it is quite beautiful.)

Wahinee
April 17th, 2013, 09:01 AM
I use shea butter or something equally heavy to protect my ends and the hairs sticking out. I braid my hair wet and then put A LOT of shea butter on the ends and run the rest over the length of my braid. It makes it a lot smoother

My routine is wash, wet braid and let it dry in a braid over an entire day & night, the next day I wear my hair in a bun, then wash and repeat

karenpetal
April 17th, 2013, 09:07 AM
Hi Rowie

I have gone back and forth between various dos at different lengths - similar to you I like to have a routine - mainly for simplicity. I started with doing half ups since I could not get all my back hair in a clean ponytail - then for the longest time I wore a simple ponytail either at the nape or right behind my nose. As hair got little longer (between shoulder and APL) I found buns to be most effective (simple bun using a stick or a protective wraparound).

But as it grew longer than APL (between APL and BSL) buns got too heavy so I moved to braids. For me I prefer the French Braid the best as it helps tuck all hair in and gives a clean sleek look. I Usually lightly oil my hair (coconut) before braiding to avoid fly-aways. Also with a french braid it is easy to tuck it in (especially since where I worked at that time had a no long hair for safety reasons)

Hope this helps - great going on growth !

Latte Lady
April 17th, 2013, 09:32 AM
I don't see much difference, damage wise, in bunning or braiding my hair. When I bun my hair I get damage if I wear the same style in the same place, every day. I don't rearrange my hair throughout the day though. Too fussy for even me.
I get slightly more damage with braiding, but not much more. I braided my hair for years before I learned to bun. I got damage from rubbing against rough clothing but nothing terrible. I got the most damage from tying off my ends in the same place. Once I learned to switch that up I saw my ends start to thicken up. So some days I braid to the very end and some days I leave a large tassel.
I tend to favor bunning over braiding now since I don't have to redo my buns. My braids got fuzzy, no matter what. I was always re-combing and re-braiding to keep them looking nice.

Miss Maisie
April 17th, 2013, 09:41 AM
My almost BSL baby fine hair revolts in braids. It slips out of even the tightest braids in no time. It's buns for me, every day. I change up the type (top knot, lazy wrap, cinnabun, etc), but buns it is!

torrilin
April 17th, 2013, 10:23 AM
(Btw, I wear a low English plait cinnabunned every day and have for about 1.5 years. Same style, same spot on the head, no problem. I've grown to knee and am still going, despite having fine hair. I think the whole thing about changing styles and moving the style around your head is ... over-rated. Yes, I have nape breakage, but that's from having to wear a cycle helmet, not from wearing the same bun every day.)

I think style rotation is mostly a big deal for the easy and common first updos. Stuff like ponytails, tight cinnabuns and the like. In fine and slippery hair, it can be really tempting to just go tighter so it will stay up, and that works up to a point. But eventually it will cause breakage and get counter-productive. If you get in the habit of rotating your styles and switching things up early on, you'll be less likely to get stuck in a trap of face lift tight hair and breakage layers. Rotating doesn't have to be a big huge deal either. Ponytail, cinnabun, braid is sufficient rotation for my fine, slippery and fragile hair to go from shoulderish to past BSL.

I also kind of think "bun vs braid" isn't all that clear cut, as you're kind of pointing out here. A lot of comfortable and practical updos are based on braids. Another large chunk aren't. My single braid is edging towards waist length, and leaving it loose is starting to get in the way. Loose twin braids are a touch longer, and I definitely pay attention to how I drape them so they don't catch on door knobs or dangle in a candle flame. But sticking them into an updo is pretty straightforward.

I do tend to find that for my hair, braid based styles are a LOT more durable. They can handle more wear and tear.

GeoJ
April 17th, 2013, 11:39 AM
My daughter wears a single braid nearly every day and it has not caused any noticeable damage. Her hair is a couple of inches past classic now (would be somewhere between hip and tailbone on an adult of my size). Rarely I use paranda with her braids. Usually I tie it off with soft satin hair ties I bought in India (I have never seen these ties in the US). I do vary her braids. Most often is the typical 3 strand braid, sometimes 5 strand or 4 strand braids, rarely twist braids or herringbone braids & braids of braids (like 5 different 3 stranded braids that are then braided together into a 5 strand braid). Usually I start at the nape, sometimes I start with one or two Dutch, French, or fairytale braids. For some activities she wears buns, but that is not often. Sometimes I do crown braids on her also.

Note: Now that DD's hair is past classic, I prefer braids that eat up more length, when I get the time to.

I once grew my hair from near waist to classic length with braids (typically a single nape 3 strand braid). Later I grew from hip to upper thigh mostly twisting my hair up and holding it with a claw clip. What made the most difference for my hair was learning about coconut oil. My hair loves coconut oil.

Panth
April 17th, 2013, 12:36 PM
I think style rotation is mostly a big deal for the easy and common first updos. Stuff like ponytails, tight cinnabuns and the like. In fine and slippery hair, it can be really tempting to just go tighter so it will stay up, and that works up to a point. But eventually it will cause breakage and get counter-productive. If you get in the habit of rotating your styles and switching things up early on, you'll be less likely to get stuck in a trap of face lift tight hair and breakage layers. Rotating doesn't have to be a big huge deal either. Ponytail, cinnabun, braid is sufficient rotation for my fine, slippery and fragile hair to go from shoulderish to past BSL.

I also kind of think "bun vs braid" isn't all that clear cut, as you're kind of pointing out here. A lot of comfortable and practical updos are based on braids. Another large chunk aren't. My single braid is edging towards waist length, and leaving it loose is starting to get in the way. Loose twin braids are a touch longer, and I definitely pay attention to how I drape them so they don't catch on door knobs or dangle in a candle flame. But sticking them into an updo is pretty straightforward.

I do tend to find that for my hair, braid based styles are a LOT more durable. They can handle more wear and tear.

I should have clarified - I was speaking simply in terms of loose plaits vs. some sort of bun - i.e. off the nape of the neck vs. not. For me, there is a big difference between the two - loose plaits results in a false terminal at TBL, buns result in knee length and still going. However, all of my buns are plaited ... so it is not technically an absolute "bun only" situation.

Also, I forgot about ponytails. I don't do them at all ... so I forgot. I agree, if you are making your plaits or buns ponytail-based then moving them around might be more necessary.

(I'm not sure I agree with you about rotation, though. If you're doing plaits/ponytails/buns tight enough to cause a face-lift and breakage, it's the tightness that is the problem not that you don't rotate where you place your plait/ponytail/bun. The solution is to do the style looser (or to learn new styles that stay up without needing such tightness). Rotating where you place the style won't fix anything, it'll just spread the damage around. Maybe that's fine for BSL, but it'll probably come back and bite you if you try to get to classic+. You'll have to come up with another solution (i.e. looser styles) and then spend ages growing out the damage. Better to just target the problem correctly to start with. (And I say this as someone who, like you, has fine, slippery and fragile hair.))

LakeofGlass
April 18th, 2013, 09:12 AM
Wear your hair the way you want to. If a braid is most convenient/comfortable, wear it in a braid. Wait a month or two, check your ends, and if you see damage then rethink your hair strategy. I don't really believe that wearing it in a braid instead of a bun is going to help you get to your goal length, but it probably won't hinder it. Hair grows differently for different people, and it will damage differently for different people. It all depends on your lifestyle.

This is pretty much what I was saying, lol. People have different hair types, therefore a braid only or a bun only can't be said to be the best. One person's hair may damage easily, in spite of using a good hair care routine, while another's may be naturally more strong. There's also whether or not one's scalp can handle the weight of a bun or braided bun. There are plenty of non-damaging styles. All one has to do is choose. :)

torrilin
April 18th, 2013, 12:52 PM
I'm not sure I agree with you about rotation, though. If you're doing plaits/ponytails/buns tight enough to cause a face-lift and breakage, it's the tightness that is the problem not that you don't rotate where you place your plait/ponytail/bun. The solution is to do the style looser (or to learn new styles that stay up without needing such tightness)

I think we do actually agree.

To me rotation involves changing the style from day to day. It can also include changing the placement, but the key factor is to do different hairstyles regularly. A lot of styles that are easy to do like ponytails and cinnabuns are very tempting to do tightly (especially on shortish, slippery hair). If you're not doing a tight style every day, it will reduce or prevent breakage... and hopefully provide a chance for a new longhair to work out styles that do not need to be so tight. A lot of new posters seem convinced that updos must cause breakage, and it seems very common for them to only know two: ponytail and cinnabun.

I also tend to feel that the good habit of wearing your hair contained in some way (whether a bun, braided bun, braids or a half up) is important. It doesn't have to be perfectly protective. The point is to do your hair, and not mess with it after. If you feel compelled to fuss, fuss over learning new hairstyles instead of detangling or poking at your ends.

As my hair has grown past waist, I find for me, rotation is less important. A Celtic knot bun is easy, fast, looks good, and works with my bike helmet. Win all around if my hair is loose. And single or twin braids are easy to bun or clip up. I don't think I'd have such an easy time with my hair now tho if I didn't have the habits formed when my hair was shorter.

gracenotes
April 18th, 2013, 01:11 PM
I think if you're trying to wear the same style every day, a single braid is probably the gentlest way to to. As long as you keep the braid from getting stuck in things, it should be fine. I agree with BambooBeauty about oiling the ends. I do that every time my hair is braided and it keeps the ends soft and protected. :)

Panth
April 18th, 2013, 01:24 PM
I think we do actually agree.

To me rotation involves changing the style from day to day. It can also include changing the placement, but the key factor is to do different hairstyles regularly. A lot of styles that are easy to do like ponytails and cinnabuns are very tempting to do tightly (especially on shortish, slippery hair). If you're not doing a tight style every day, it will reduce or prevent breakage... and hopefully provide a chance for a new longhair to work out styles that do not need to be so tight. A lot of new posters seem convinced that updos must cause breakage, and it seems very common for them to only know two: ponytail and cinnabun.

I also tend to feel that the good habit of wearing your hair contained in some way (whether a bun, braided bun, braids or a half up) is important. It doesn't have to be perfectly protective. The point is to do your hair, and not mess with it after. If you feel compelled to fuss, fuss over learning new hairstyles instead of detangling or poking at your ends.

As my hair has grown past waist, I find for me, rotation is less important. A Celtic knot bun is easy, fast, looks good, and works with my bike helmet. Win all around if my hair is loose. And single or twin braids are easy to bun or clip up. I don't think I'd have such an easy time with my hair now tho if I didn't have the habits formed when my hair was shorter.

Maybe we do and don't agree. :flower:

I agree that tight ponytail and/or a tight cinnabun in the same spot day after day would probably cause breakage in most hairtypes.

I'm not convinced on the rotation issue - either style or placement. I wear a low English plait bunned into a cinnabun every day. I don't change my plait to a different one or to no plait, I don't change my bun style, I don't change the placement of my plait/bun, I don't even change the tools I use to keep it up (spinpins). For me that's fine. It doesn't cause any problems. So, as I said for me rotation is overrated.

(I also agree about not fussing with your hair being key.)

As for me, I have a fairly easy time with my hair. But, unlike you, I never learnt to do anything more complicated than a low English plait until it was past TBL. So, now I find learning any other plaits or buns incredibly difficult or impossible. So... I just don't. But, that also equals no-fuss hair...

itsMEowKat
April 18th, 2013, 01:50 PM
I see that braids seem to get more wear, and damage. Do any of you feel this also applies to loose braids while sleeping? And for those of you that do, how then do you keep your hair when you sleep to prevent tangling and damage?

Panth
April 19th, 2013, 01:06 AM
I see that braids seem to get more wear, and damage. Do any of you feel this also applies to loose braids while sleeping? And for those of you that do, how then do you keep your hair when you sleep to prevent tangling and damage?

I think it definitely applies when sleeping - my plaits would be a fuzzy nightmare after sleeping with them. To eliminate this, I plait and then wear a sleep 'stocking' (i.e. tube of silk satin sewn to a wide elastic hairband). Well, actually I don't plait especially for sleep, I just have a plaited cinnabun all day, let down the bun, tie off the plait tassel and go from there.

However, it is also a matter of *relative* damage and the point when something becomes too difficult, painful, fussy or ugly for *you*. So, buns > plaits > loose (for most people) when awake, but then buns are fairly easy to learn and for most people wearing buns while awake is not very painful or ugly. But, it's often a whole different ballpark when sleeping. Most people, I think, find buns too painful or uncomfortable to sleep on. So, it doesn't really matter if buns are better than plaits for sleeping - if you can't wear buns to sleep, the difference is moot.

torrilin
April 19th, 2013, 07:58 AM
Maybe we do and don't agree. :flower:

Sounds reasonable to me :).

It seems to be easier for most people to learn new tricks when their hair is relatively short, say BSL or less. And really, an awful lot of new tricks work out to "new braids". Lace braiding is the one I wish I'd learnt in my teens rather than last year. Most materials about learning braiding present lace braiding as some difficult thing, and on shortish hair it's quite easy... and it opens up scads of hairstyle options.

I don't need or use a gazillion options every day. But it definitely helps to have a toolkit of styles and techniques. For example, I do sleep in buns sometimes. The buns I can make that are flat enough to go under a bike helmet are also flat enough to sleep in. And a bun on top of my head works for sleeping too. When I had hand surgery last summer, I spent nearly a week straight in twin braids (the same ones!) and then something like a month sleeping in buns because I couldn't braid my own hair. Easy. And I'm sure you can imagine how glad I was to be back to able to braid!

Panth
April 19th, 2013, 10:45 AM
Sounds reasonable to me :).

It seems to be easier for most people to learn new tricks when their hair is relatively short, say BSL or less. And really, an awful lot of new tricks work out to "new braids". Lace braiding is the one I wish I'd learnt in my teens rather than last year. Most materials about learning braiding present lace braiding as some difficult thing, and on shortish hair it's quite easy... and it opens up scads of hairstyle options.

I don't need or use a gazillion options every day. But it definitely helps to have a toolkit of styles and techniques. For example, I do sleep in buns sometimes. The buns I can make that are flat enough to go under a bike helmet are also flat enough to sleep in. And a bun on top of my head works for sleeping too. When I had hand surgery last summer, I spent nearly a week straight in twin braids (the same ones!) and then something like a month sleeping in buns because I couldn't braid my own hair. Easy. And I'm sure you can imagine how glad I was to be back to able to braid!

Oh, definitely. At mid-thigh, I can't really learn ANYTHING new. I can't french or dutch plait (on me). I have managed to learn 2-strand rope braids, but can't do lace braids or multi-strand braids. My hair is longer than my arms now, so the dividing and re-dividing associated with plaits just makes them impossible unless I really know what I'm doing.

Also, having worn my hair in a centre parting my entire life, I now can't persuade it to lie any other way.

Learning new stuff would be so much easier with shorter hair. But, then, I'm fairly lazy about my hair so even if I did cut shorter I probably wouldn't learn many new styles. So, english plait, cinnabun, nautilus and faux crown braid it is. That's enough for me.

catamonica
April 22nd, 2013, 11:19 AM
I got longer hair from wearing my hair up. I only braid at night. Probably a cloth tie would be better than a pony tail tie. If you use
water or oil on the end, you might not have to use a tie. I have used water & the end stays. But oil probably works better.

Selkie-
May 30th, 2014, 03:23 AM
Personally, I think this is true of most "LHC lore". It's great for trouble-shooting, as everyone chimes in with an opinion that helped for them so you get lots of options, including really uncommon or obscure ones. It's terrible for designing a routine, because by default the net total of everyone's opinions = the most extreme, complicated, time-consuming, worry-wart sort of routine. You get a routine that might coax the most fragile hair to grow, or might enable you to reach floor-length, but is completely excessive for someone who is growing more average hair to more (LHC) average lengths (or even my fine hair to quite extreme lengths).

If I was you, I'd just keep doing what I was doing. I'd cut out stuff that seemed too fussy for me. Personally, that's: washing that is more complicated than S&C or oil shampoo, any other treatments, any supplements, any handling more complicated than once-daily combing and plaiting, any every-day hairstyles more complicated than a braided cinnabun or a nautilus, swapping hairstyles daily/more than daily, swapping where I start my bun, etc. I spend (comparatively) very little time on my hair. I also spend (comparatively) very little money on it. My main investment is the most important one: TIME.

Then, if you notice a problem, you can come here, troubleshoot and correct for it. With very long lengths it may take quite a while for the correction to make a difference, but personally I would take that over spending every waking moment faffing with my hair.

Long hair (just like short hair) can be all about fuss, money, fancy products and complicated routines. But it doesn't have to be. And, I'm pretty sure most of the classic+ people here have very simple routines. Benign neglect is a (very!) viable hair growing method.

(Of course, if you want it to be about fancy products, complicated routines and billions of hairstyles, it can be... that is also good, but only if you want it!)

I know this is resurrecting an old thread but I just have to say the above post is brilliant! So wise and such good advice. :)