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Curlsgirl
August 27th, 2008, 12:54 PM
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/06/fashion/06locks.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

freznow
August 27th, 2008, 01:15 PM
It's been brought up before. Heidi W. and I think one other LHCer? were interviewed for that article.

*goes off to search for the link on the old boards*

Edit: found! (http://archive.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=70043)

Fencai
August 27th, 2008, 01:23 PM
interesting article!
Thanks for sharing, I handt seen it!

Euphony
August 27th, 2008, 01:34 PM
It is a good article. I actually have a small blurb and a link printed off and stuffed in my car. I tend to run off at the mouth when someone asks me if I donate my hair. My husband was appalled the first time I was asked, his thinking was - can't I just grow it for me. He's relatively armed with information now too :grin:

PseudoScot
August 27th, 2008, 01:37 PM
This thread (http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=547) has some elaboration on other options. I knew there was a reason that article felt familiar!

Chamomile betty
August 27th, 2008, 01:39 PM
Very interesting.
It just shows how much the public, and myself, are unaware how much hair is not used.

Thanks for posting that Curlsgirl.

lora410
August 27th, 2008, 01:42 PM
How awesome that the woman with calf length hair stood up for herself when people though it was selfish NOT to donate her hair. I wish alot of people would ready how much hair LOL throws away *sigh*

Nightshade
August 27th, 2008, 01:49 PM
Am I the only one who doesn't get how these hair-donation organizations say on their sites that the hair must be contained in a ponytail, i.e. they have to pony it and cut above it, and yet the articles show pictures like this? :confused:

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/09/06/fashion/06lock190.2.jpg http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/09/05/fashion/06lock190.4.jpg

Or is that the world's smallest ponytail?? WTF?

Lamb
August 27th, 2008, 01:58 PM
“A check would be easier for me,” Ms. Coffman said. “But would the donors get out of it what they do? No.”

Aww, don't tell me she is being charitable that way, too, making sure everyone gets that "warm, fuzzy feeling." :confused: I mean, if a check is easier, why doesn't she darn well ask for checks instead of hair?? Why encourage donations for nothing?
Or is it just a teeny bit possible that people wouldn't shower her with checks the way they do with hair? :rolleyes:

arylkin
August 27th, 2008, 02:59 PM
“A check would be easier for me,” Ms. Coffman said. “But would the donors get out of it what they do? No.”

Aww, don't tell me she is being charitable that way, too, making sure everyone gets that "warm, fuzzy feeling." :confused: I mean, if a check is easier, why doesn't she darn well ask for checks instead of hair?? Why encourage donations for nothing?
Or is it just a teeny bit possible that people wouldn't shower her with checks the way they do with hair? :rolleyes:

Yeah, it really does seem kind of shady- especially when you compare the amount of hair donations received vs. the amount of wigs actually given away. What's annoying is I know people who have given away their hair, and I'm sure they would not have given it away if they had known about this. People give away their hair so they can help other people, not so they can get a "warm and fuzzy feeling". :rolleyes:

Tapioca
August 27th, 2008, 03:15 PM
Here's my response to the "fuzzies" - (warning-rant ahead)
You want a warm and fuzzy feeling? Donate some blood, or some time, or some sweat. There are plenty of nursing homes that could use volunteers, Habitat for Humanity doesn't care if you don't know how to swing a hammer, and the Red Cross is always looking for donors. If you don't have time, *every* charity will happily take a monetary donation.

Nightshade
August 27th, 2008, 03:23 PM
Here's my response to the "fuzzies" - (warning-rant ahead)
You want a warm and fuzzy feeling? Donate some blood, or some time, or some sweat. There are plenty of nursing homes that could use volunteers, Habitat for Humanity doesn't care if you don't know how to swing a hammer, and the Red Cross is always looking for donors. If you don't have time, *every* charity will happily take a monetary donation.

Personally, I think it's more about praise. You spend 20 hours helping at a nursing home, no one notices outside the facility.

You donate to LOL people go, "OH! You cut your hair" and now they get to blather about their sacrifice and outpouring of generosity.

Charitable acts, IMHO, are not about getting recognition. :rolleyes:

I donate blood, a lot. Nobody commends me for the scars on the insides of my arms, they just probably think I'm some sort of addict if they notice at all :p

musicmomma
August 27th, 2008, 03:29 PM
i understand why people are upset but if you don't read the rules and faq's you can't be angry. most places will tell you exactly what they need and if folks send in dyed hair, short hair, frazzled hair, they didn't read the info before they donated. and if they didn't read the info, they should have investigated the charity before they donated. just my opinion though.

DaveDecker
August 27th, 2008, 07:34 PM
Heidi W. and I think one other LHCer? were interviewed for that article. Correct.


Personally, I think it's more about praise. You spend 20 hours helping at a nursing home, no one notices outside the facility.

You donate to LOL people go, "OH! You cut your hair" and now they get to blather about their sacrifice and outpouring of generosity.

Charitable acts, IMHO, are not about getting recognition. :rolleyes:

I donate blood, a lot. Nobody commends me for the scars on the insides of my arms, they just probably think I'm some sort of addict if they notice at all :p

Excellent point, Nightshade!

Bene
August 27th, 2008, 09:47 PM
a few years ago, when i had long hair, my boss' wife asked me if i was donating to LOL. i answered with a "nope", and she had the nerve to ask "but, why not?"

biting my tongue, i quickly responded "because it's my hair"


when i finally did chop it off (because it was just bad hair, having been colored treated and heat damaged), she came up to me and sweetly asked me if i had donated. again, i told her "nope"




the look on her face after that, priceless. she was both shocked, and i think even offended that i wouldn't want to give to sick kids. i knew about LOL, and while i didn't know at the time that most hair is thrown away, i did know that it wasn't long enough and it wouldn't be acceptable because it wasn't virgin.


but aside from that, i have other reasons. i don't hate cancer kids. i'm just apathetic towards them. i don't think i'm a bad person, i just don't care about cancer kids. i donate blood as often as possible (except for time off because of piercings and tattoos), and i spend most of my free time at a nursing home. i don't need to make myself feel better about myself because i gave a bald kid my hair. i do, however, have a serious problem with ppl treating me like i'm inhuman because i don't want to do this.

Sidani
August 27th, 2008, 10:26 PM
Thank you for posting this, Curlsgirl, I feel much more informed now. I had no idea about how those folks worked.

meichigo
August 27th, 2008, 10:33 PM
When I was at university there was a blood drive. I was all willing, if apprehensive, to donate. I answered no to every single question on their questionaire except one... had I had a needlestick within the last six months.
I was a fashion student. I prick myself with pins and needles on a regular basis. (Obviously accidentally.)

So they turned me down. Essentially this means I will never be able to donate blood unless I throw out all my pins and replace them with new ones just to make sure I don't accidentally poke myself with a pin that someone else had previously accidentally poked themself with.

Tapioca
August 28th, 2008, 10:37 AM
When I was at university there was a blood drive. I was all willing, if apprehensive, to donate. I answered no to every single question on their questionaire except one... had I had a needlestick within the last six months.
I was a fashion student. I prick myself with pins and needles on a regular basis. (Obviously accidentally.)

So they turned me down. Essentially this means I will never be able to donate blood unless I throw out all my pins and replace them with new ones just to make sure I don't accidentally poke myself with a pin that someone else had previously accidentally poked themself with.

I would think that a needlestick would refer to a hypodermic needle. I work for the landfill department, and one of our guys got a needlestick a few months ago while sorting out recyclables.

heidihug
August 28th, 2008, 11:30 AM
People give away their hair so they can help other people, not so they can get a "warm and fuzzy feeling".

I think that helping other people is a part of it, but I think many many people give away "stuff" rather than money (hair, Goodwill-type items) because it gives them a warm and fuzzy feeling without them having to actually pull out their wallet. And then they can tell other people about their donation. I mean, you wouldn't be talking to an acquaintance and then say "I just donated $100 to the Red Cross". At least I wouldn't mention a monetary donation. But, as nightshade said, you can talk about cutting your hair and donating it because it's an obvious appearance change.

Xi
August 28th, 2008, 08:46 PM
I don't particularly mind why other people donate their hair -- if they want to help people, feel good, or be praised, that's their business.

But I do find it strange that people feel free to tell me to donate my hair. No one has ever stopped me on the street randomly and told me to donate my time or money to kids with cancer. Surely a body part is even more personal than time or money?:shrug:

Thank-you for this article -- I'm glad to have the information straight in my own mind.:)