PDA

View Full Version : Pretty desperate for Dandruff help



Kivamaki
March 12th, 2013, 09:36 AM
Hello, I've been seriously struggling with dandruff for a couple years now. At least 3 years. I have tried nearly everything I can think to remedy (except baking soda) this. I've tried dandruff shampoos, nizoral, 100% organic shampoo, water only (I'm currently about 4-5 weeks on water only), coconut oil, hot oil, tea tree oil, acv rinses. I figured I'd go water only since my hair likes it more and no matter what I do I still have terrible dandruff.

I'm still trying acv rinses since it treats my hair decently. Last night I did a acv rinse, very diluted (I just learned about pH and how little acv you actually need). I used 1 part acv: 100 part water. (1 cup water with 1/4 teaspoon acv). And this morning my hair is soft, minimal build up but my dandruff is just crazy. Its all over my hair, and if I play with my hair at all the dandruff just flows out.

I really need to fix this, any suggestions? I've done maybe 4 acv rinses. Last night was my first one properly diluted at about 4 pH.

Kivamaki
March 12th, 2013, 09:38 AM
Also I'm male, with medium length hair.

melusine963
March 12th, 2013, 10:20 AM
Yikes. I would recommend Nizoral, but you've already tried that. Have you been to see a doctor about this? You may need a good prescription shampoo.

RavenBaby
March 12th, 2013, 10:55 AM
I have the exact same problem, this is nothing you can self treat. You must see a GP like I did and get a special scalp solution to rub onto the whole scalp every day and if it persists they have stronger medicine but yeah this is not a simple dandruff problem if it lasted that long. I was told I was suffering from it because of stress but the treatment is working pretty good, I was sorry I didn't seek medical help sooner!

EDIT: My dandruff was terrible too, nothing simple and small, it was embarrasing and visible.

Kivamaki
March 12th, 2013, 11:06 AM
I have the exact same problem, this is nothing you can self treat. You must see a GP like I did and get a special scalp solution to rub onto the whole scalp every day and if it persists they have stronger medicine but yeah this is not a simple dandruff problem if it lasted that long. I was told I was suffering from it because of stress but the treatment is working pretty good, I was sorry I didn't seek medical help sooner!

EDIT: My dandruff was terrible too, nothing simple and small, it was embarrasing and visible.

Do you still have to take the treatment shampoo? I don't want to have to take this for life, also I'm sire the chemicals are pretty harsh.

RavenBaby
March 12th, 2013, 11:29 AM
well, I have only been taking it for a month and when I stop using it for a couple days (which I shouldn't have done) the dandruff came back a little bit but I don't think It's a thing that you have to use forever but it was the first step in regards to what medication she was gonna give me. I will not be using this forever at all and if it comes back with me not using it than I will ask for the next medicine (pills or whatever). I would always choose using this over having the dandruff, it was ruining my self confidence. I think the treatment is supposed to kill the dandruff problem and leave me with not having to treat it anymore after it's gone. I think it's worth seeing a doctor for as there is treatments that don't have to touch the scalp I think.

longforthis
March 12th, 2013, 11:32 AM
I'll be interested in any tips, too.

I have always have had bad dandruff. I used medicated shampoos, CWC, CO, No 'Poo, oil treatments, herbal rinses, and am now water only.

I haven't tried tea tree oil and am really hoping that might work!

Naiadryade
March 12th, 2013, 11:35 AM
Hmm. It does sound like you've tried many things, and RavenBaby might be right. But I can offer what experience I've had treating my lifelong dandruff problem (though mine may not be as severe as yours).

Two things have worked for me: ACV and castor oil.

I did the ACV treatments when I was WO, before I joined LHC. These weren't diluted ACV rinses. This was straight ACV applied directly and thoroughly to my scalp, and then allowed to sit for an hour or more before I rinsed it out. It worked quite well to control my itchy, flaky scalp. It's true that this is way more acidic than your hair wants to be in the long run, but as long as you rinse it out well (maybe even followed with it diluted to the proper pH), I don't think it's going to hurt your hair. It might just be a little drying.

Nowadays, my dandruff has been eliminated by the oil I put on my scalp every 1-2 nights. My mix is about 65% castor oil, 25% sweet almond oil, 10% jojoba oil, and 2% essential oils: lavender, geranium, clary sage, Texas cedarwood, wild thyme, and lemon. I believe it's mostly the castor oil that's helping, as it is very moisturizing, sinks in deep to the scalp, and is antifungal/antibacterial, but it could also be that the essential oils boost that effect. I just massage it into my scalp with a drop at a time spread over my fingers, adding another drop when my fingers get dry until I feel like I've gotten my whole scalp. If I forget to use it for a few days, I start to get itchy and flaky, but it goes away almost immediately when I oil again. Bonus: castor oil may make your hair grow thicker and/or faster!

raingirl
March 12th, 2013, 12:09 PM
As far as I understand, dandruff can be a fungal infection. I would get to a GP or Dermatologist for a culture of the flakes to see what you are dealing with.

Also, it can be diet related, especially if fungal. Maybe try a low carb/no sugar diet for a while and see if it improves?

turquoisedays
March 12th, 2013, 12:11 PM
Diluted monistat is the only thing I've used that makes my scalp feel totally clean and dandruff free until I wash it. I don't use it anymore, though.

Kivamaki
March 12th, 2013, 05:33 PM
When I used Nirzoral (and I still have it), it was the 1%, but I guess you can buy the 2% on Amazon now without a prescription. Think this is worth a try? I'm a little worried that it would dry out my hair pretty bad.

http://www.amazon.com/Nizoral-Shampoo-Ketoconazole-Anti-dandruff-Thailand/dp/B00BCOVTEO/ref=sr_1_2?s=beauty&ie=UTF8&qid=1363131148&sr=1-2&keywords=nizoral+2%25

Mandie
March 12th, 2013, 07:23 PM
My dad had really awful dandruff (no dark shirts in his closet bad) and he now has no symptoms with tea tree oil. Seems worth a shot. He puts it on after every shower.

floralgem
March 12th, 2013, 07:26 PM
I was needing a thread like this! I've been dealing with dandruff since I started washing my hair less often, so I might try going back to 3 times a week (though it might dry my hair a bit.) But I should try these, thanks guys!

OrganicMechanic
March 13th, 2013, 06:14 PM
As far as I understand, dandruff can be a fungal infection. I would get to a GP or Dermatologist for a culture of the flakes to see what you are dealing with.

Also, it can be diet related, especially if fungal. Maybe try a low carb/no sugar diet for a while and see if it improves?

a while back I had a mold problem with my house which caused dandruff, to keep it under control, I rinsed it with 1/4 apple cider vinegar and 3/4 water. If this helps, great (you also might want to check for mold in your house because of the dangers to your health btw), if it doesn't it will strengthen your hair any way :)

Naiadryade
March 13th, 2013, 06:41 PM
a while back I had a mold problem with my house which caused dandruff, to keep it under control, I rinsed it with 1/4 apple cider vinegar and 3/4 water. If this helps, great (you also might want to check for mold in your house because of the dangers to your health btw), if it doesn't it will strengthen your hair any way :)

This scares me a bit, mostly because it probably happened to me in the house I used to live in without me even realizing, and that's kind of gross to think about.

But yeah, a strong dilution of ACV like the one you suggested always cleared it right up, at least for a little while. Vinegar kills fungus.

akilina
March 13th, 2013, 06:42 PM
Snip
Hmm. It does sound like you've tried many things



castor oil.

Snip


As far as I understand, dandruff can be a fungal infection.
Snip:

Snip: Diluted monistat is the only thing I've used that makes my scalp feel totally clean and dandruff free until I wash it. I don't use it anymore, though.

All of these!!

I suggest trying monistat..I know that sounds creepy...but there is NO reason to be freaked out by it. Its not like the monistat cream is made out of vaginas. Its just an anti fungal cream.

AnthonyB93
March 13th, 2013, 07:13 PM
Use castor oil, maybe with some other oil. This has anti fungal properties. It helps my medical dandruff. Just take a bottle with a resevoir tip(hairdye bottle) and apply to your scalp and massage it in. Leave in over night and wash out in the morning.

chrissy-b
March 13th, 2013, 07:19 PM
I agree with trying Monistat and tea tree oil. And also seeing a derm if you can. I've had luck with shampoo bars for dandruff (THIS ONE (http://www.etsy.com/listing/86818857/neem-tea-tree-rosemary-herbal-shampoo) in particular is great).

OrganicMechanic
March 13th, 2013, 10:16 PM
This scares me a bit, mostly because it probably happened to me in the house I used to live in without me even realizing, and that's kind of gross to think about.

But yeah, a strong dilution of ACV like the one you suggested always cleared it right up, at least for a little while. Vinegar kills fungus.

I'm sorry you had to deal with it. I've lived with it most of my life, so I've developed a pretty bad intolerance for it. Vinegar also kills staph too, so if you have acne it might help :D

Kivamaki
March 14th, 2013, 12:11 PM
I have tried many oils and none have worked so I'm concerned with just wasting time trying castor oil. I'm learning more towards the Nizoral 2% or Monistat.

jacqueline101
March 14th, 2013, 12:20 PM
I get the occasional flair ups I use garnier fructis anti dandruff shampoo and conditioner.

AnthonyB93
March 14th, 2013, 01:55 PM
I have tried many oils and none have worked so I'm concerned with just wasting time trying castor oil. I'm learning more towards the Nizoral 2% or Monistat.

Castor oil has a natural form of Miconzale nitrate in the monistat that get rid of dandruff.

Happytresses
March 14th, 2013, 03:51 PM
I had the same problem. The dandruff was so bad that I started to shed more than usual. I finally went to the derm and he told me that I have Seborrheic Dermatatis. He prescribed ketoconazole shampoo. I used it the first three days in a row and the flakes just went nuts. I only use it on my scalp. I guess the first use gets all the flaking off and then I went to using it once a week and now Its once every two weeks. I shampoo with my regular shampoo. I wish I had known this sooner. I really struggled with it. I would type at my desk at work and see flakes on my black keyboard. I battled it for about 4 years. Go to the derm and make sure its not something else, especially if you have tried on your own. The strength of the Ketoconazole is 2% so you have to get a prescription. My hair and my scalp are way better and I dont flake anyomre.

jillosity
March 14th, 2013, 07:17 PM
I had dandruff years ago, and actually both of my parents did too, my father's was extremely severe and my mom still has it. Mine went away when I started using Reincarnate solid shampoo by Lush, it has rhassoul mud in it and it absolutely cleared up my scalp. I used it for several years after just because it smells great and my hair was clean and shiny after using it. Especially so when I did an ACV rinse afterward and did minimal rinsing, basically I left most of it in my hair. Reincarnate worked for my mom too, but she was too lazy to use a bar if you can believe it, her scalp is always a mess.

I think it can also be related to diet, too much processed foods and sugar perhaps.

legendya
March 15th, 2013, 01:15 AM
Have you tried undiluted ACV? It helped with my dandruff. I rub some undiluted ACV on my scalp (trying not to get too much on my hair) and cover my head with a shower cap. After 30 min, I wash my hair with shampoo. It cleared up my dandruff and made my scalp feel clean and fresh.

akilina
March 15th, 2013, 01:45 AM
Try to get ahold of malibu wellness packets...search on amazon. I am on my phone so going and finding the link would be difficult. Today at work i used one on a client (the one in the grey packet) for the first time and it worked wonders...
Do try to be open minded and search for these online to read ingredients and even search their website..they have lots of q and a and info backing these packs. I gather that they are really cheap for a box on amazon. Just throwing that up there...this stuff really worked wonders on my client today.

Kherome
March 15th, 2013, 02:31 AM
You seem to be missing the most important point made on this thread OP, see a doctor first to get a proper diagnosis of the problem, then try a treatment.

leslissocool
March 15th, 2013, 03:24 AM
All these years I thought I had really bad dandruff until I started to flake on my face. I went to the dermatologist and he told me I had Psoriasis, not very severe at all but enough to flake in my face to be noticeable (and it bothered me a lot).

Go to the doctor.

SleepyTangles
March 15th, 2013, 08:39 AM
I have often dandruff and itching problems. For long I used henna to ease the problem, but when I turned to sulphate free shampoos it got considerably better (provided a period of assessment: every treatment tends to boost the symptoms before solving the problem). Instead, long periods between washing do nothing for me, or even worsened it up.
Now my dandruff is more a "stress" thing. I just try to relax and use a delicate anti-dandruff shampoo.

From my limited experience, most dandruff comes from harsh products - for this reason I try to not rely on harsh medicated shampoo, like the ones with sulfur and coal tar - or stress. But I'd go to see a dermatologist in any case: just to sort out the reasons behind your scalp problems.

DinaAG
March 15th, 2013, 01:03 PM
daily washing shampoo roots only with sulfate free and silicone free helped me alot and every 5 days silsun blue or nizoral, just do not put oil on ur scalp it will make it worse

DinaAG
March 15th, 2013, 01:06 PM
ah i forgot: less as much as possible ur intake of sugar, fats and diary products=much better effect

Kivamaki
March 25th, 2013, 07:30 AM
OP here, I went to the dermatologist and he basically perscriped me a sal-acid shampoo and Clobestesol foam for my scalp. I looked these up and they seem to pretty much be temporary treatments that I'd have to take for life, that also have side effects. I'm looking for a better solution, I know there's on about there. I've done about 3 more ACV (very diluted) since my last post, and they clean my hair well and it's soft but my dandruff is awful after it dries. I always put some coconut oil in while my hair is damp, and my scalp. I've done two water rinses in the last couple days and I've noticed my hair getting oily sooner than it normally does (causing me to rinse). I normally rinse my hair once a week. I rinses my hair Saturday night and its oily enough for me to do it again already.


daily washing shampoo roots only with sulfate free and silicone free helped me alot and every 5 days silsun blue or nizoral, just do not put oil on ur scalp it will make it worse

Why not put oil on the scalp? I always put coconut or jojoba oil on.

Naiadryade
March 25th, 2013, 09:23 AM
Two things:

One- Try castor oil! It's really done wonders for my dandruff. You might want to also try adding some essential oils (I think this makes mine even more effective against the dandruff specifically). Cedarwood, clary sage, rosemary, and thyme are all good EO's for dandruff. There are even EO's you could add to encourage your sebum production to balance out (meaning your hair won't look oily so fast). Check out this awesome page, courtesy of Shell (http://gossamerstrands.com/Hair/Westherbart.htm). It has a section on dandruff treatments as well as a section on essential oils.

Two- You say you "rinse" your hair. Do you know how to do a proper water-only wash? It's a little more involved than rinsing your hair with water. Basically, you massage your scalp and your hair (gently but firmly) under running water for like, as long as you can stand it. Certainly no less than 5 minutes of just massaging your hair under running water. Just make sure you're not rubbing upwards towards your head, or in a way that will create tangles. If you haven't been doing this, starting to do so might help your hair not look oily again so fast, because more of the dirt and oil will have actually been washed away. Also, how long have you been WO? There's definitely an adjustment period while your scalp figures out it's no longer getting stripped on the regular and can calm down a bit with its sebum production!

ETA: There's no universal reason to not put oil on your scalp. For some people, oiling their scalp causes shedding. For me, castor oil has reduced my shedding. Lots of folks oil their scalp every day. YMMV. Just pay attention to your reactions to each new thing!

Kivamaki
March 25th, 2013, 10:49 AM
Two things:

One- Try castor oil! It's really done wonders for my dandruff. You might want to also try adding some essential oils (I think this makes mine even more effective against the dandruff specifically). Cedarwood, clary sage, rosemary, and thyme are all good EO's for dandruff. There are even EO's you could add to encourage your sebum production to balance out (meaning your hair won't look oily so fast). Check out this awesome page, courtesy of Shell (http://gossamerstrands.com/Hair/Westherbart.htm). It has a section on dandruff treatments as well as a section on essential oils.

Two- You say you "rinse" your hair. Do you know how to do a proper water-only wash? It's a little more involved than rinsing your hair with water. Basically, you massage your scalp and your hair (gently but firmly) under running water for like, as long as you can stand it. Certainly no less than 5 minutes of just massaging your hair under running water. Just make sure you're not rubbing upwards towards your head, or in a way that will create tangles. If you haven't been doing this, starting to do so might help your hair not look oily again so fast, because more of the dirt and oil will have actually been washed away. Also, how long have you been WO? There's definitely an adjustment period while your scalp figures out it's no longer getting stripped on the regular and can calm down a bit with its sebum production!

ETA: There's no universal reason to not put oil on your scalp. For some people, oiling their scalp causes shedding. For me, castor oil has reduced my shedding. Lots of folks oil their scalp every day. YMMV. Just pay attention to your reactions to each new thing!

I tried castor oil (bought from walgreens) last week once, I left it on for about 2 hours and washed it out. I had to use acv and nizoral to wash it out because it was so thick (I didn't want to use a shampoo).

I've been WO for about 2 months, but my dandruff was just as bad when I used shampoo.

Naiadryade
March 25th, 2013, 11:06 AM
I tried castor oil (bought from walgreens) last week once, I left it on for about 2 hours and washed it out. I had to use acv and nizoral to wash it out because it was so thick (I didn't want to use a shampoo).

I've been WO for about 2 months, but my dandruff was just as bad when I used shampoo.

Castor oil absorbs very well if you give it time and don't use too much. I put one drop on a finger, then spread it over all my fingers so there is just a sheen. Then I massage my scalp with oily fingers. When my fingers aren't oily anymore, I'll add another drop, spread it out, and keep going. Repeat until you've massaged your whole head with slightly oily fingers. I do this at night before going to sleep, and by the morning it's all absorbed and it doesn't look or feel greasy. I don't need to wash it out.

ETA: Also, Nizoral is shampoo. It has an extra antifungal ingredient, yes, but it's actually a rather harsh, SLS-based shampoo. If you're using that occasionally, no wonder your hair is having trouble adjusting to WO! The SLS in the Nizoral is stripping your hair, leaving your scalp all confused about how much sebum to produce.

Kivamaki
March 25th, 2013, 11:37 AM
Castor oil absorbs very well if you give it time and don't use too much. I put one drop on a finger, then spread it over all my fingers so there is just a sheen. Then I massage my scalp with oily fingers. When my fingers aren't oily anymore, I'll add another drop, spread it out, and keep going. Repeat until you've massaged your whole head with slightly oily fingers. I do this at night before going to sleep, and by the morning it's all absorbed and it doesn't look or feel greasy. I don't need to wash it out.

ETA: Also, Nizoral is shampoo. It has an extra antifungal ingredient, yes, but it's actually a rather harsh, SLS-based shampoo. If you're using that occasionally, no wonder your hair is having trouble adjusting to WO! The SLS in the Nizoral is stripping your hair, leaving your scalp all confused about how much sebum to produce.

I try the castor oil again tonight. I only used the nizoral once, just because I couldn't get the castor oil out. I haven't used it any other time.

EtherealDoll
March 25th, 2013, 02:16 PM
Henna is the only sure thing that definitely gets rid of dandruff. I had terrible dandruff throughout all my teen years and only henna got rid of it(and I held it on my head for only 25 minutes so it doesn't turn orange, and it wasn't full on henna, it was mixed with conditioner).

heidi w.
March 25th, 2013, 03:19 PM
I have dandruff all the time but I just shampoo my head, then shampoo a second time. I've only found one shampoo that ever got rid of the symptoms in the first wash. *** shampoo by ***. It works!
heidi w.

leilasahhar
March 25th, 2013, 03:47 PM
Ive had problems with dry scalp in the past and came upon a product called Redwood Roots..its a mist that keeps the scalp moisturized and to promote growth. Its been amazing for me. I personally did not want to do the prescription shampoo or other "drug" route, as I was afraid of the stuff drying me out even more :)

DinaAG
April 3rd, 2013, 08:35 PM
check the last section here dear, thats the reason http://edition.cnn.com/HEALTH/library/seborrheic-dermatitis/DS00984.html

Kivamaki
April 5th, 2013, 10:15 AM
I've tried castor oil about 4 times now, I applied it the night before last and let it sit on my scalp all day yesterday and rinsed it this morning. I rinsed my hair in cool, and then warm water for 5 minutes, massaging my scalp. My dandruff is so awful right now, I have to wear a hat it's so noticable from far away. I've never had it this bad. I'm not saying it's due to castor oil, I'm just so lost as to what's causing it. I'm about to cut all my hair off but I know the dandruff will still fall from my scalp. At least you won't be able to see it.

I've tried Tea Tree oil before DinaAG, it just dried my scalp.

Memza
April 5th, 2013, 12:58 PM
Several other posters have mentioned henna, I would suggest cassia as it also has anti fungal properties but won't affect your hair colour. It is the only thing that ever worked for me.

Kivamaki
April 5th, 2013, 02:47 PM
Several other posters have mentioned henna, I would suggest cassia as it also has anti fungal properties but won't affect your hair colour. It is the only thing that ever worked for me.

I've done henna before to actually dye my hair, and only once with a neutral. The results were great and I don't remember the results on the neutral. I don't really like how it thickens your hair by coating it and will eventually go away. I used Light Mountain Henna, which I found out the active ingredient is Cassia. So I guess I could try that again? The neutral.

Sarahlabyrinth
April 5th, 2013, 04:13 PM
Try chopping up a double handful of fresh lemon leaves, allow them to soak in just enough boiling water to cover them. When the water has cooled to room temperature, strain out the leaves then use the "tea" to rinse your scalp and hair. I haven't needed a dandruff remedy myself and haven't tried it but this recipe is from a trichologist (specialist in hair problems) in New Zealand. At least you know what is in this remedy, unlike some shampoos....

heidi w.
April 5th, 2013, 05:33 PM
Diet can make a moderate difference. Dandruff is irritating. I have Seborrheic Dermatitus which is an advanced form of dandruff. A number of months back now, I had to cut off my length...all of it since was in a gigantic knot that I couldn't undo. So I cut it off. My hair is around chin length now. So, first take a breath and relax. Second, whatever it takes, find a shampoo without SLS,,,however much it might cost. Second, wash the hair with this shampoo, after doing an ACV rinse properly.
Properly is with 3 T of baking powder blended with 3 T of shampoo; blended so there are no lumps whatsoever; wet all the hair and wash the hair. Continue this wash repeatedly for around 3 days or so. First, notice the symptoms, if they go away when you do this or if they increase. Increase means it doesn't work at all; decrease means you have some management. When you condition the hair, DO NOT condition the scalp whatsoever. Only from the top of the ears on down the length. No matter what happens DO NOT CUT YOUR HAIR. Dandruff is a short or long-term problem. Each person's dandruff experience is highly different. If you want, make an appointment with a licensed dermatologist to find out whatever. Nizoral worked for me for a short couple of years; then I found an SLS-free shampoo along with a conditioner that helped my situation decidedly as well as detangling my hair.
Patience, it'll all work out somehow.
PM me if you like.
heidi w.

heidi w.
April 5th, 2013, 05:48 PM
You MUST see a licensed dermatologist and get a prescription or shampoo treatment AND a diagnosis. Not all flakes = Dandruff; but all Dandruff = flakes. That's the way it is. You can read online about Dandruff and Seborrheic Dermatitus which is called cradle cap in babies. And hear even more gossip about how to solve Dandruff. ACV is the best thing for the scalp.
heidi w.

ravenreed
April 5th, 2013, 06:10 PM
Shampoo won't remove oil. A CO wash is the best way to remove it. I suggest trying what your doctor prescribed first to see if your dandruff lessens, and then look for alternative solutions. You can make your problem worse by throwing too much at it.


I try the castor oil again tonight. I only used the nizoral once, just because I couldn't get the castor oil out. I haven't used it any other time.

ellen732
April 5th, 2013, 06:43 PM
I have to mention nettle tea. It is known for helping dandruff when used as a rinse.

Kivamaki
April 5th, 2013, 08:26 PM
Shampoo won't remove oil. A CO wash is the best way to remove it. I suggest trying what your doctor prescribed first to see if your dandruff lessens, and then look for alternative solutions. You can make your problem worse by throwing too much at it.

Shampoo removing oil is sort of irrelevant since I'm water only anyways. I looked up what my doctor prescribed me and it just seems too harsh. I could go to store bought shampoo just to lessen the dandruff till I can get ahold of some cassia or henna again.

heidi w.
April 5th, 2013, 08:29 PM
Henna is for the hair; Dandruff is a scalp skin problem. Completely different and a bunch of hullabaloo is henna.
heidi w.

patienceneeded
April 5th, 2013, 09:37 PM
I would really consider following your dermatologists advice on treatment. Once the situation is under control, then perhaps look for alternatives to treat your condition. If it's as desperate as you make it sound, then follow your doc's suggested course of treatment and use the darn shampoo!

Mesmerise
April 5th, 2013, 09:40 PM
Henna is for the hair; Dandruff is a scalp skin problem. Completely different and a bunch of hullabaloo is henna.
heidi w.

Henna is applied to all the hair, including the scalp though... and the posters here are talking about its effect on the SCALP not the hair.

Henna can be used to treat skin conditions (here is an example, although it's for cancer patients suffering from side effects from their treatment: http://hennablogspot.com/how-to-use-henna-to-treat-hand-foot-syndrome/).

The point is, regardless of your opinions of henna for hair, don't be so quick to dismiss henna's other properties and the ways in which it may benefit the scalp.

heidi w.
April 5th, 2013, 11:06 PM
Don't be so quick to dismiss me. You guys want science, I'll bring you a boatload of science which I've already written about in the past. Long posts. Explaining.
Don't henna your hair; it won't solve a thing, most likely. That's my guess. MY GUESS. Yep, my guess.
Now I'm being clear on what to do. First, listen to the dermatologist. Try their suggestion out at least once. And see how it goes. I did and that's what got me started to solving my S.D. problem. Then, do either lemon juice or ACV rinsing where you clear the hair so as to be as sure as possible that ACV is getting on the scalp. Then, clean your detangling tools the same way you wash your hair. Wash your pillowcase too. Condition as told to you, by leaning from one side or the other to get the conditioner on the length, but NOT on the scalp. Do ACVing a few times and see how your scalp looks. You can also scritch the scalp prior to a hairwash with a scritching comb sold exclusively for the purpose, a really small comb, about the size of a comb for a large dolls head...this will loosen the detris and help to lift off the crud before showering. Then shower with ACV. Then condition almost as usual. THEN let it air dry. Don't put a thing on the scalp at all.

I recommend you read up on Dandruff. It's a tough one to solve but it can be done to a certain degree. People of all ages get
Dandruff; and there's no fixed age when one gets it. And there's no actual solution to curing the problem. There's only managing the problem. I still manage my S.D. to this day, and now I have much shorter hair than ever, but it's growing. Slow, but surely growing. I'm older now too. I'm 52. I've been on LHC for many years, and was invited by other members to join up. Now they're mostly someplace else.

You can PM me with any questions you want.
heidi w.
P.S. I know what I'm talking about. As in scientifically and why I'm telling you everything. I don't explain like I used to explain. I explained.

Bunnysaur
April 5th, 2013, 11:34 PM
I'm not sure if it's been mentioned here yet, but I use neem and tea tree oil to control my SD.
Neem powder in my henna also works wonders. Neem's a wonderful ingredient and has many benefits for hair and skin, I use it on acne, my SD and even healing piercings! The only drawback to neem is that it smells like death. The powder I add to my henna doesn't reek, but the oil, wow. It's nasty.
I have a squeeze bottle that has neem, tea tree, hemp and rosemary (for the smell) oils in it, and I apply it to my scalp about an hour before each wash. it's made such a difference!

Allychan
April 6th, 2013, 05:55 AM
Well I just thought I'd chime in.

Getting the dandruff under control and eliminating it altogether are two different things. unfortunately western medicine often looks only at treating symptoms not the cause. Indian culture uses castor oil to rid the scalp of dandruff because it (castor oil) is an antifungal and antibacterial.

Anyone with babies that have had cradle cap would've likely been told at some time to massage warm oil into the scalp, this loosens the dry skin. I am GUESSING this is why your dandruff got worse when you used the castor oil. Basically you are sloughing off the skin, it'll take a week or two to get rid of this off your scalp.

AVC is also an antibacterial and will help get the castor oil out if you aren't a shampoo fan. Coconut oil also has some antibacterial properties and can be mixed with the castor oil to thin it down so it isn't so 'viscousy' (if that's even a word?).

EtherealDoll
April 6th, 2013, 07:00 AM
... and the posters here are talking about its effect on the SCALP not the hair.



Yes, that's what I was talking about.

Everybody here mentioned what worked for them, so I mentioned what worked for me. But since I talked about henna, I must be lying or being totally stupid or Heaven only knows what! because it's suddenly has a topic on its own how it is so stupid to ever suggest henna because somebody hates it! Great! Let's all make topics about how others' posts are so stuuupid because they dared to suggest something that somebody hates! What a lovely forum!

MsBubbles
April 6th, 2013, 08:50 AM
EtherealDoll :grouphug:

Please continue to post your input. I think that's generally the way things happen around here, that we all post what worked for us and the other members can take what they like from it, and leave the rest.

SLS ("Sodium Laureth/Laurel Sulfate") shampoos give me dandruff almost immediately! I haven't had dandruff since switching to Aubrey Organics Tea Tree Clarifying shampoo years ago. That is, I get dandruff back immediately when I run out of AO and have to borrow my son's cheap drug store shampoo.

The problem with dandruff is that it can take so long for the problem to go away even after you may well have eliminated the problem, that it's hard to pinpoint the cause. I think it took about 6 weeks for the dandruff to quit when I switched to Aubrey Organics.

Also if I don't wash my scalp at least every 2 days, I get dandruff. I can't have a greasy scalp (and I do have a naturally very greasy scalp).

goldloli
April 6th, 2013, 09:13 AM
I know it's been said, but go to the doctor. That medicated shampoo you mentioned, sure it's harsh but you shouldn't need to be on it long term. I had scalp itchies that were leading to flakes and alopecia, obviously a scalp condition! I used that shampoo, at the same time was taking probiotics and refraining from any form of heavy residue on scalp such as oil or hair masks (I usually apply hair masks liberally up to the roots). Now I cant say this will cure your dandruff as I had a different scalp condition... What I can say is that if there's a bacterial issue or a fungal one, this should address it. I think tea tree neat or in a strong concentration is bad for skin, if it's a skin issue and not a fungal/bacterial then strong tea tree might irritate the skin. I'd add a couple drops to a hair rinse or shampoo instead. There are various metallic salts added to dandruff products but if it's a skin issue this could irritate. One of the more common ones is zinc (oxide, carbonate etc), which is very calming to skin, on head or body. There are actually zinc soaps that are used by people with eczema/acne. I would look to find something that contains this ingredient, I know head and shoulders does, but it also contains many things that build up too. Zinc is also a natural anti fungal, I think this is one of its modes as action as dandruff treatment.

lapushka
April 6th, 2013, 09:19 AM
I'd say do what the doctor prescribed first and foremost too, until it's under control. Then you can try alternate routes.

Unicorn
April 6th, 2013, 09:32 AM
As far as I understand, dandruff can be a fungal infection. I would get to a GP or Dermatologist for a culture of the flakes to see what you are dealing with.

Also, it can be diet related, especially if fungal. Maybe try a low carb/no sugar diet for a while and see if it improves?

+1

OP, I think a`lot of your difficulties are from expecting immediate results. While dandruff is often a fungal problem, it can take some time for solutions to work. I had severe dandruff and eventually resolved it using ACV rinses 2-3 times a week, I also stopped using any oils on my scalp, which I did do previously. It took over a year for my dandruff to disappear completely and a couple of months for me to notice any real difference at all.

An ACV rinse 2 or 3 times a month, now seems to be enough to now keep it at bay. The solution you use seems rather weak to my thinking. I use about 1/2 cup in a bowl of water and spend about 5 minutes pouring it through my hair and scalp, plus dunking my hair and scalp into the bowl of water. I use it as a final rinse.

It's worth re-reading Heidi W's post. I'd agree with majority of it and the level of detail is really helpful.

We only differ in our opinions on the henna. Henna has excellent anti-fungal properties, but it seems a rather complex solution for dandruff when ACV does the same job over time. So I'd still agree with Hiedi on not using it as a dandruff solution, even if my reasons are different.

N.B. About the caster oil, it does tend to make the dandruff appear worse initially, as it seems to strip away deeper layers that would otherwise take longer to flake off. I hope that makes sense...

Unicorn.

DinaAG
April 7th, 2013, 06:13 PM
dear cutting wont solve it, try again selsun blue/nizoral first wash then second time leave it on your scalp for 5 minutes before rinsing and please do not put any oil on it and tell me the results. wishing you the best dear

planetqueenie
April 7th, 2013, 09:26 PM
Dandruff is fungal, that's why it itches. tea tree oil is an awesome anti fungal, and there are lots of other herbal antifungals. apple cider vinegar is also great. just shampoo your hair with a mild shampoo like california baby shampoo, or if you don't like shampoo try egg yolk! it's my secret. 1 egg yolk in one cup of water, mix and pour through wet hair. massage and leave in for a few minutes and them rinse out. that will clean you hair. then rinse your hair with 1 tbls apple cider vinegar in a cup of water with 5-10 drops tea tree oil. leave that in your hair. take 1 tsp jojoba or virgin coconut oil(antifungal) and mix with tea tree oil (about 5 drops max) and massage that into scalp and leave in over night as a treatment. dietary: fungus feeds off sugar, avoid antibiotics, sugar, and eat healthy! do not eat raw egg white as it has avidin which binds to biotin preventing absorbstion. biotin is needed for healthy hair and skin. you may also want to avoid gluten as it has been linked to skin problems. REMEMBER: YOU NEED TO BE CONSISTANT to see results. using something once or twice is not enough.

Kivamaki
May 27th, 2013, 10:15 PM
I wanted to bring this back up since it's an ongoing issue for me and I've followed some advice and given it some time.

I did end up cutting my hair pretty short, but alas still tons and tons of dandruff, hot scalp, and itchy scalp. I ACV rinse about 1-2 times a week. My dilution is one coffee mug of water with about 1-2 tablespoons of acv. I've seen TOO many acv ratios to know what's correct. I have really short hair so I would assume this is enough especially to the scalp. There has been once or twice where my dandruff was quite less after the acv rinse, but still had an itchy scalp, and further rinses after that still have awful dandruff after them. I'm pretty consistent with the rinses.

I do let my hair get oily before I do an acv rinse. My hair is always really dry and lifeless out if the shower, and after a few days the oil in my hair makes my hair better. Maybe this is an issue? I've read oily scalps/hair can cause dandruff.

Another thing is sex drive. I have a very high sex drive, which I know increases testosterone and that can be converted into DHT which can lead to hair loss and dandruff. I'm wondering if this could be the issue? If so, it makes me want to try nizoral again (but the 2%) since it kills/blocks the DHT I hear.

Kivamaki
May 27th, 2013, 10:16 PM
Also, acv rinses for about 2 months now.

jeanniet
May 27th, 2013, 10:53 PM
Have you ever used the products prescribed to you?

BlazingHeart
May 27th, 2013, 11:13 PM
Okay, so...there's a point that almost everyone here seems to be missing. Based on what the doctor prescribed for you, you don't have dandruff. He would have given you an antifungal if you did, and he didn't. If you use dandruff treatments on a scalp that doesn't actually HAVE dandruff, all you're going to do is irritate it, which is what you've been doing and why things are getting worse instead of better.

The things he gave you serve two purposes. One is to help your skin shed in small, unnoticeable pieces instead of big flakes (that's the salicylic acid). The other is to decrease the inflammation, irritation, heat, and pain (that's the clobetesol).

Now, based on what he prescribed to you, you're probably looking at lifelong conditions. I would guess either psoriasis or a dermatitis (probably seborrheic dermatitis). There are some things that help with those: exposing the scalp to sunlight often helps (though for a small percentage of people it makes it worse); regular washing can help; good moisturizing (I suggest shea butter, though coconut oil may be okay - for some people, it causes breakouts, but for many it works well); and of course, the medication you've been prescribed. Now, for some people, if you break the inflammation cycle, things stay better for a significant period of time, even if you wean off the medications (that is, use the medications exactly as prescribed, probably every day, and keep doing that until everything calms down). For some people, you're right, it's medication for life. If you're serious about wanting to get rid of it, here's where I'd start: eliminate as many fragrances and dyes as you can (use fragrance-free lotions like Jason's Naturals or Magick Botanicals, use a fragrance free powder detergent - I recommend Arm and Hammer's, use shampoos and conditioners that are fragrance-free or scented with essential oils like Jason's Naturals, Magick Botanicals, Chagrin Valley 'poo bars, etc). Give it a few weeks, and if that doesn't help, I'd start thinking about diet. Dietary intolerance and mild allergies can cause skin problems like this. Wheat, corn, milk, soy, nightshade vegetables (tomatos, potatoes, and eggplants), and eggs are the ones that come to mind - you might need to do an elimination diet to figure out if your diet is causing this. Finally, there is the possibility that it could be autoimmune. If that's the case, steroids are about the only thing that will help, I'm afraid.

I hope this is helpful. I have psoriasis on my scalp, and am just now starting to deal with it. I thought my scalp irritation had to do with something else, but when that changed and it still wasn't getting better, I had the doctor look at it, and next I'm off to the dermatologist. I know rather a lot about this because I've done my research, and have friends and family with these conditions. My family is very sensitive-skinned on both sides, so unfortunately we have to learn this stuff (and to love sunblock, because we're Irish-fair on one side of the family, and prone to sunburns and skin cancer).

~Blaze

Firefox7275
May 28th, 2013, 07:44 AM
What have you actually been diagnosed with? Dandruff is not a proper medical term, sometimes that is used by laypeople to mean a flaky scalp which can have any one of a number of causes, sometimes it specifically refers to seborrhoeic dermatitis which is partly related to a yeast overgrowth. If you have a problem with malassezia them failing to cleanse your scalp effectively but gently is the worst thing you can do. ACV is drying, it may reset the pH of the scalp but it absolutely will NOT repair the skin's protective acid mantle, that is also comprised of beneficial microorganisms on the skin and a certain amount of secretions such as sweat and sebum.

Agree with those that say diet is highly relevant and that certain oils either feed the malassezia or irritate reactive scalps, especially those rich in oleic acid.

Kivamaki
May 28th, 2013, 11:54 PM
Okay, so...there's a point that almost everyone here seems to be missing. Based on what the doctor prescribed for you, you don't have dandruff. He would have given you an antifungal if you did, and he didn't. If you use dandruff treatments on a scalp that doesn't actually HAVE dandruff, all you're going to do is irritate it, which is what you've been doing and why things are getting worse instead of better.

The things he gave you serve two purposes. One is to help your skin shed in small, unnoticeable pieces instead of big flakes (that's the salicylic acid). The other is to decrease the inflammation, irritation, heat, and pain (that's the clobetesol).

Now, based on what he prescribed to you, you're probably looking at lifelong conditions. I would guess either psoriasis or a dermatitis (probably seborrheic dermatitis). There are some things that help with those: exposing the scalp to sunlight often helps (though for a small percentage of people it makes it worse); regular washing can help; good moisturizing (I suggest shea butter, though coconut oil may be okay - for some people, it causes breakouts, but for many it works well); and of course, the medication you've been prescribed. Now, for some people, if you break the inflammation cycle, things stay better for a significant period of time, even if you wean off the medications (that is, use the medications exactly as prescribed, probably every day, and keep doing that until everything calms down). For some people, you're right, it's medication for life. If you're serious about wanting to get rid of it, here's where I'd start: eliminate as many fragrances and dyes as you can (use fragrance-free lotions like Jason's Naturals or Magick Botanicals, use a fragrance free powder detergent - I recommend Arm and Hammer's, use shampoos and conditioners that are fragrance-free or scented with essential oils like Jason's Naturals, Magick Botanicals, Chagrin Valley 'poo bars, etc). Give it a few weeks, and if that doesn't help, I'd start thinking about diet. Dietary intolerance and mild allergies can cause skin problems like this. Wheat, corn, milk, soy, nightshade vegetables (tomatos, potatoes, and eggplants), and eggs are the ones that come to mind - you might need to do an elimination diet to figure out if your diet is causing this. Finally, there is the possibility that it could be autoimmune. If that's the case, steroids are about the only thing that will help, I'm afraid.

I hope this is helpful. I have psoriasis on my scalp, and am just now starting to deal with it. I thought my scalp irritation had to do with something else, but when that changed and it still wasn't getting better, I had the doctor look at it, and next I'm off to the dermatologist. I know rather a lot about this because I've done my research, and have friends and family with these conditions. My family is very sensitive-skinned on both sides, so unfortunately we have to learn this stuff (and to love sunblock, because we're Irish-fair on one side of the family, and prone to sunburns and skin cancer).

~Blaze

I use zero fragrances in any products i use. Nor do I use any shampoo or condition. I use straight water and ACV rinses. The dermatologist told me it was Seborrheic Dermatitis. I believe I have a decent diet, I intake very little sweets/milk/soy and eggs sometimes. Should I stop the ACV rinses then? I'm scared of going back to shampoos because of how awful the ingredients are in them, even the "natural" ones have terrible stuff in them like JASON/Aubrey/etc etc. I believe now part of the issue is maybe I let my scalp get too oily before washing (WO/ACV) my hair. I don't really massage it either to bring the oil to my hair, I'm pretty lazy with that.

Also worried this could lead to hairloss because of heard of Seborrheic Dermatitis could lead to hairloss which I do notice my hair being a little thinner at the temples of my hairline. This plus the flakes want me to get it fixed STAT. I'm going to make an appointment with my family doctor tomorrow and get her suggestions and perhaps she can recommend a dermatologist.

jeanniet
May 29th, 2013, 12:31 AM
I use zero fragrances in any products i use. Nor do I use any shampoo or condition. I use straight water and ACV rinses. The dermatologist told me it was Seborrheic Dermatitis. I believe I have a decent diet, I intake very little sweets/milk/soy and eggs sometimes. Should I stop the ACV rinses then? I'm scared of going back to shampoos because of how awful the ingredients are in them, even the "natural" ones have terrible stuff in them like JASON/Aubrey/etc etc. I believe now part of the issue is maybe I let my scalp get too oily before washing (WO/ACV) my hair. I don't really massage it either to bring the oil to my hair, I'm pretty lazy with that.

Also worried this could lead to hairloss because of heard of Seborrheic Dermatitis could lead to hairloss which I do notice my hair being a little thinner at the temples of my hairline. This plus the flakes want me to get it fixed STAT. I'm going to make an appointment with my family doctor tomorrow and get her suggestions and perhaps she can recommend a dermatologist.

Again, did you ever use the products the original dermatologist prescribed for you? Rather than playing around with things that are obviously not working, it would be better to use the medicated products, get your scalp calmed down, and then figure out a routine that will keep it that way. Going at it in a hit-or-miss fashion is more likely to irritate your scalp and make the problem worse. Another dermatologist isn't going to be helpful if you're not willing to follow their suggestions and use what they prescribe for you.

Kivamaki
May 29th, 2013, 12:43 AM
Again, did you ever use the products the original dermatologist prescribed for you? Rather than playing around with things that are obviously not working, it would be better to use the medicated products, get your scalp calmed down, and then figure out a routine that will keep it that way. Going at it in a hit-or-miss fashion is more likely to irritate your scalp and make the problem worse. Another dermatologist isn't going to be helpful if you're not willing to follow their suggestions and use what they prescribe for you.

If I take what the original dermatologist suggested, how will I find an alternative to help with the issue if I keep having to take what they prescribed? I'm hesitant to follow his suggestions since it was less than a 5 minute consultation and out the door.

jeanniet
May 29th, 2013, 01:05 AM
If I take what the original dermatologist suggested, how will I find an alternative to help with the issue if I keep having to take what they prescribed? I'm hesitant to follow his suggestions since it was less than a 5 minute consultation and out the door.

If you use the prescribed products to relieve the scalp issue, then you'll have a clean slate to start from, and you can see what other products/methods work and what don't. As it is now, you're just guessing, and since you've had this problem for a couple of years now, clearly you haven't found a solution. I realize that you don't want to use anything with what you consider to be toxic ingredients, but you may have to choose between that and having a healthy scalp, at least in the short term. Dermatologists see a lot of SD, so a short consultation doesn't necessarily mean the doctor didn't know what he was talking about.

BlazingHeart
May 29th, 2013, 03:23 AM
If I take what the original dermatologist suggested, how will I find an alternative to help with the issue if I keep having to take what they prescribed? I'm hesitant to follow his suggestions since it was less than a 5 minute consultation and out the door.

As I already said, you can sometimes break the irritation cycle by using exactly what the doctor prescribed to you. If you break the irritation cycle, you may be able to go with other methods in the future. The idea is to get you back to your baseline - that is, where you don't have the itching, burning, and flakes. There is a solid chance you won't need these all the time. I'm trying to think of a good metaphor for this. Think of it as hitting the reset button on your scalp because your scalp's operating system has crashed. Once the reset is done, you can try other methods of managing your system to avoid a crash, but you need to get to that reset point first. What the doctor prescribed you is the fastest and most reliable way to reset your scalp. Doing anything else first will probably mean you spend more time with the flakes and the discomfort.

(alternatively...have you ever gotten so angry with someone or something that you need to step back, cool down, and calm your temper so you don't start yelling at them? That's where your scalp is now. For your scalp, the prescribed treatments are how it can calm down and get a hold on its temper, maybe see things a different way so it's not so upset. And once it's calmed down, you can start figuring out exactly what it was that made your scalp start shouting at you. It may be this spring weather - in my area, at least, it's the worst allergy season in a decade or more, and that can come into play with SD.)

Once your scalp is back to normal, you can start experimenting and trying to figure out exactly what works for you when you aren't already flared up.

I understand that this was a fast consultation, but the thing is...seborrheic dermatitis is actually a pretty easy to diagnose condition, and the first line of medications (chosen because they have high effectiveness and relatively low side-effects) are pretty standard. It's only if this doesn't work for you that things get more complicated and you get longer discussions with the doctor about what to do next.

~Blaze

danacc
June 1st, 2013, 10:26 PM
I agree with others who recommend starting with what the doctor gave you. I have seborrheic dermatitis, too. It is a condition that has flare-ups. Knowing how to get it under control is important. This is the "reset". It is much easier to figure out what works for you when you start in the calmed-down state. Work with your doctor and do whatever it takes to get it calmed down, and then start figuring out a more gentle routine that won't trigger it. Since you've tried ACV rinses for a couple of months, and it's still a problem, that is clearly not enough to reset it.

Firefox7275
June 2nd, 2013, 10:09 AM
I use zero fragrances in any products i use. Nor do I use any shampoo or condition. I use straight water and ACV rinses. The dermatologist told me it was Seborrheic Dermatitis. I believe I have a decent diet, I intake very little sweets/milk/soy and eggs sometimes. Should I stop the ACV rinses then? I'm scared of going back to shampoos because of how awful the ingredients are in them, even the "natural" ones have terrible stuff in them like JASON/Aubrey/etc etc. I believe now part of the issue is maybe I let my scalp get too oily before washing (WO/ACV) my hair. I don't really massage it either to bring the oil to my hair, I'm pretty lazy with that.

Also worried this could lead to hairloss because of heard of Seborrheic Dermatitis could lead to hairloss which I do notice my hair being a little thinner at the temples of my hairline. This plus the flakes want me to get it fixed STAT. I'm going to make an appointment with my family doctor tomorrow and get her suggestions and perhaps she can recommend a dermatologist.

Decent diet is not the point, anti inflammatory is: the balance of different fatty acids (especially oily fish), types of carbohydrates (very low glycaemic index/ load), other anti inflammatory foods (especially dark or bright coloured low sugar fruits and non starchy vegetables). I work in/ qualified to degree level in lifestyle healthcare, I very very rarely see anyone who hits all the government recommendations - far from ideal - let alone optimum nutrition. If you are not consuming milk or soy where are you getting your calcium from?

Absolutely agree your choice of cleansing method is an issue because your own sebum and sweat contains irritants, especially oleic acid. Have you tried cleansers that respect the skin's barrier function and acid mantle? Most products claim to be 'pH balanced' meaning neutral/ 7. Massaging more could be counter productive, you don't want to overstimulate your sebaceous glands nor cause irritation/ inflammation.



If I take what the original dermatologist suggested, how will I find an alternative to help with the issue if I keep having to take what they prescribed? I'm hesitant to follow his suggestions since it was less than a 5 minute consultation and out the door.

Seborrhoeic dermatitis is super common and super easy to diagnose - it's done by family doctors here in the UK - not sure what the point in getting a diagnosis was if you are going to ignore it? There is no cure for SD only treatments, you may be able to become asymptomatic with lifestyle modification and choosing products that respect and repair the skin barrier but you will have to continue that for life.


What I really note from your posts is the use of negative words like 'worried' and 'scared' - firstly stress is pro inflammatory so can worsen seborrhoeic dermatitis. Secondly people who get get overly concerned about chemicals in food or products but don't have a science background too often end up worsening their health by just cutting everything out without replacing it with suitable alternatives. A healthy body evolved to keep nasties out, the skin is a barrier and so is the digestive system. It's all about balance, no food or cosmetic ingredient is entirely good or bad unless you personally are allergic or sensitive to it, the amount you consume or use is critical. If you did not consume every food or ingredient that someone somewhere in the world was allergic or sensitive to you would die.

starlamelissa
June 5th, 2013, 07:06 PM
Chemicals aren't necessarily bad. Quite a few are just lovely. I'd recommend using the treatment the doctor gave you, and frequently washing your hair with shampoo. My husband has dermatitis...and his scalp, eyebrows, and face do best with a good daily lathering. He uses bar soap on his face and dandruff shampoo on his head. Hydrocortisone cream on his face and a scalp treatment if he is having a reoccurrence.

StephanieP3
June 29th, 2013, 02:28 PM
I have had dandruff issues ever since moving from Missouri to Florida, and the only thing I have tried that has worked ( I have no health insurance and I cannot afford a doctor) and my husband and myself have both started using t gel CVS brand, the past month or two and our dandruff is finally under control!

martyna_22
June 30th, 2013, 02:38 AM
I don't know if you have access to it, but the one mask that helps me is an Ukrainian one - Sulsena. I was pretty amazed when it helped me, but it really did, nothing else seemed to help. After 2-3 applications I got rid of dandruff almost completely. Now I have to use it regularly, but it helps, so I don't mind :)

Pigfarts
July 1st, 2013, 01:50 PM
I don't know if this has been said, but Coconut Oil is REALLY helpful. It moisturizes your scalp and it's antibacterial and a fungicide! If you mix that with some Tea Tree Essential Oil(fungicide) and some Lavender Essential Oil (calms skins and antibacterial), it should help. :)

get 2tbsp of the coconut oil and a few drops of each oil and really massage it into your scalp. Then let it sit there as long as possible. :)

McFearless
July 1st, 2013, 05:16 PM
I don't know if this has been said, but Coconut Oil is REALLY helpful. It moisturizes your scalp and it's antibacterial and a fungicide! If you mix that with some Tea Tree Essential Oil(fungicide) and some Lavender Essential Oil (calms skins and antibacterial), it should help. :)

get 2tbsp of the coconut oil and a few drops of each oil and really massage it into your scalp. Then let it sit there as long as possible. :)
Unrefined coconut oil has cleared up my scalp psoriasis. The trick for me is applying it on a wet scalp. For some reason applying it on a dry scalp doesn't get rid of the flakes or itchiness. There are some people who need to warm it to get results. Every case is different.

Neem oil is another alternative treatment. I prefer it to tea tree oil myself.