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View Full Version : Are styles easier with one length hair?



Fluffy01
February 19th, 2013, 08:10 AM
I recently got some more layers put in my curly hair. Now the shortest is between chin and shoulder and the longest is about mid bsl and mid back. I did it for volume at the crown but I think I made a mistake. One of my goals is to be able to braid my hair in different ways and bun it with sticks, etc. Now I am having issues even bunning in a Ficcare. Should I shoot for one length eventually since I wear my hair up most of the time and forget crown volume? Will it make my goals easier or it doesn't matter? Thanks!

hypersensitive
February 19th, 2013, 03:30 PM
Yes. Layers do not work effortlessly with braids or buns. It is much easier to do when your hair is one length. You will have to deal with hair sticking out and bobby pins/hair spray/gel will be a must if you want to get a sleek look

Fluffy01
February 19th, 2013, 05:57 PM
Yes. Layers do not work effortlessly with braids or buns. It is much easier to do when your hair is one length. You will have to deal with hair sticking out and bobby pins/hair spray/gel will be a must if you want to get a sleek look

Thank you for your response! I'm guessing hemlines are still okay though? Like a U shaped wouldn't be like layers right? Or is it better to be all straight across? Thanks again!

hafattack
February 19th, 2013, 07:09 PM
I have a v hemline.. it is quickly turning into fairy tail ends, but i have no problem bunning

dulce
February 19th, 2013, 09:44 PM
I had multi layers all over plus a sharp v hem when it was mid back,I grew it all out to one length as braids and buns were too difficult[layers kept sticking out] and I hated the thin taper in my braids and ponys.So for me one length,no layers is the easiest to make my updos with.

jacqueline101
February 19th, 2013, 10:04 PM
I think if you have long layers it works better then short layers.

Sharysa
February 19th, 2013, 10:08 PM
One length is definitely easier. I've snipped off ONE lock of hair in October, and in February the last vestiges of that lock are still sticking out of the braid.

AnqeIicDemise
February 19th, 2013, 11:19 PM
One length is easier for up dos and as far as hemline goes its up to you. I like blunt hemlines but I hate how lifeless the straight across looks on my hair so I go for a shallow U. I get some form of movement and its thick, pretty and I don't have to worry about layers sticking out of my hair. Sort of. I'm still growing layers out from a chop shop cut

kidari
February 20th, 2013, 06:09 AM
I have tons of layers and I really can't do braids without it looking extremely messy. Some updos are difficult as well. However, I value crown volume and how my hair looks down more than anything. I need to have layers and movement to frame my face otherwise I'm not happy with the way I look. I wish I were one of those people who look amazing with all of their hair pulled back and who really rock the thick, long, one-length look. I guess you just need to decide what is more important to you and how you wish to wear your hair.

torrilin
February 20th, 2013, 06:45 AM
I think there's a bunch of different stuff involved.

For shorter hair (say BSL or less) it's usually possible to get a fairly all one length look. But if you think about how a blunt all one length cut is done, the individual hairs will vary in length. The hairs at the nape area will be shortest, and the ones towards your bang area will be longest. With the way you'd part your hair for braids and buns, this works well and leaves pretty minimal flyaways from the style, no matter how curly your hair or how much of a styling noob you are.

In a haircut where the stylist is cutting in layers on purpose, again, the hair lengths vary over your head. But most of the time the variation doesn't wind up really consistent with how your hair grows out of your head, so it can be very hard to work with. Even so, some members find that their hair is pretty easy to manage in a layered cut.

A few LHC members have a pretty natural hemline with a deep V and fairy tale ends. This is layered from a hairstylist's point of view, but here it tends to be done via your natural growth pattern. This kind of natural or naturalistic layering tends to be very easy to work with.

If you head past waist, you'll probably find that it's not possible to maintain a purist version of any hemline except maybe a naturalistic V, and the natural V isn't exactly easy :). So your length is somewhat working against you. Right now, if you want root volume, you must have some cut in layering, and that's just going to be annoying. But with longer lengths, you may find that cut in layers are not necessary, and your natural growth pattern solves a lot. You may also find that your hair gains root volume as you gain length... that happens sometimes and can be pretty neat.

On my straight hair, a blunt hem is preferable most of the time (tho razor sharp bluntness is not necessary). On curlier hair, that often seems to be a poor choice since it pretty much ignores how curly hair works.

Fluffy01
February 20th, 2013, 09:05 AM
I think there's a bunch of different stuff involved.

For shorter hair (say BSL or less) it's usually possible to get a fairly all one length look. But if you think about how a blunt all one length cut is done, the individual hairs will vary in length. The hairs at the nape area will be shortest, and the ones towards your bang area will be longest. With the way you'd part your hair for braids and buns, this works well and leaves pretty minimal flyaways from the style, no matter how curly your hair or how much of a styling noob you are.

In a haircut where the stylist is cutting in layers on purpose, again, the hair lengths vary over your head. But most of the time the variation doesn't wind up really consistent with how your hair grows out of your head, so it can be very hard to work with. Even so, some members find that their hair is pretty easy to manage in a layered cut.

A few LHC members have a pretty natural hemline with a deep V and fairy tale ends. This is layered from a hairstylist's point of view, but here it tends to be done via your natural growth pattern. This kind of natural or naturalistic layering tends to be very easy to work with.

If you head past waist, you'll probably find that it's not possible to maintain a purist version of any hemline except maybe a naturalistic V, and the natural V isn't exactly easy :). So your length is somewhat working against you. Right now, if you want root volume, you must have some cut in layering, and that's just going to be annoying. But with longer lengths, you may find that cut in layers are not necessary, and your natural growth pattern solves a lot. You may also find that your hair gains root volume as you gain length... that happens sometimes and can be pretty neat.

On my straight hair, a blunt hem is preferable most of the time (tho razor sharp bluntness is not necessary). On curlier hair, that often seems to be a poor choice since it pretty much ignores how curly hair works.

Wow! Thank you for your insight! I wish I had asked this before having my layers cut shorter a month ago.

So what hemline would you rec for curly hair if not blunt? U shaped? Thanks again!