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Naiadryade
December 30th, 2012, 09:36 AM
One of my favorite parts about having long hair is my ability to use it as a blanket. But that means in the winter I'm leaving it down almost all the time, and letting it get damaged... which is why it's stuck at BSL. To make it worse, I work outside playing in the snow, teaching wilderness living skills to kids. This is the time that it gets the MOST tangled, since it's under a hat, rubbing a scarf, and I'm moving around a lot--but it's also the time I need it as a blanket the most!

Does anyone know any updos that work for BSL hair, that protect my ends and prevent tangles but leave my ears and neck covered with hair? Any ideas are appreciated!!

Thanks!

LadyCelestina
December 30th, 2012, 09:56 AM
Wait,wait - You said you wear a scarf and a hat,but you still need something to warm your ears and neck? :-O

Maybe a braid,but that won't help the friction much.A bun a little lower on the nape with hair brushed over your ears could work.I don't know any updo's that cover the neck,sadly.

How about wraping your entire head in a wide scarf tied under your chin? Would that be unpleasant?

CurlyMopTop
December 30th, 2012, 10:04 AM
You could try a low hanging pony bun. I can't remember what they're called, but there are special winter hats out there somewhere designed to help protect your hair from winter damage and keep you warm. Maybe someone else could chime in with the name and where you can buy them.

Naiadryade
December 30th, 2012, 10:14 AM
Wait,wait - You said you wear a scarf and a hat,but you still need something to warm your ears and neck? :-O

Maybe a braid,but that won't help the friction much.A bun a little lower on the nape with hair brushed over your ears could work.I don't know any updo's that cover the neck,sadly.

How about wraping your entire head in a wide scarf tied under your chin? Would that be unpleasant?

It's COLD here, lol! I really don't know how short-haired folks do it. All the men I know who spend as much time outside as I do grow beards in the winter, and they still wrap their faces in scarves sometimes. Though I guess maybe they'd say, they don't know how folks who can't grow beards can do it, and I should just suck it up?

Sigh... I feel like there MUST be some styles that cover the neck, at least for very long hair. Question is, will they work for BSL.

Maybe I should try wrapping it all in a silk scarf under my fleece hat and scarf?

Thanks for the ideas! CurlyMopTop, if you remember what those hats are called please let me know!

Nique1202
December 30th, 2012, 10:27 AM
You may have to settle for a longer, wider scarf that can wrap around you multiple times to cover everywhere. Even if it's thinner fabric, if it's wider and covers more exposed skin, it will almost always be much warmer. I use cheap pashminas for my neck, and they often do the job even for my low blood pressure and low body temperature (although I usually need earmuffs or a long hat for my ears, because they're particularly sensitive to cold). I'm living in Newfoundland and growing up in southern Ontario, trust me when I tell you I know cold!

I recommend looking for a scarf or piece of material (cotton, fleece, flannel, or if it's knitted make sure it's so tight you can't see through the holes) at least 8-10 inches wide and 5+ feet long. Center it on your head as if you were going to tie it under your chin, covering from your ears on to the back, then take both ends and wrap them around your neck. I usually cross them over after wrapping them back around to the front, since they're already at an angle, it secures them against my shirt and under my coat, and it covers any drafts from a zipper that starts to come undone or a low top button. :) If you don't quite cover the bottom of the back of your hair this way, you could also use the first neck wrap a little higher, unless your scarf is particularly silky and slides against itself that should cover everything fairly well.

jacqueline101
December 30th, 2012, 10:31 AM
I'd try a pony tail sorry its not approved and use a wide scarf to cover your head all the way to the ends.

Chromis
December 30th, 2012, 10:50 AM
I wear warm knitted tams that cover all my hair and in extreme cold I'll wear a headband under that and pull my hood up too. I've also been known to double up on scarves, especially with non-hooded coats. One under the coat and one over. Keeps those pesky gaps at bay.

JadeTigress
December 30th, 2012, 11:13 AM
I just got a calorimetry for Christmas, and I love it. Keeps the ears covered, but the hair is still free for updos. It obviously won't help keep the neck warm, but mine keeps my head warmer than I would have thought just to look at it.

spidermom
December 30th, 2012, 12:05 PM
I'd wear up-dos and compensate with scarves.

Sillage
December 30th, 2012, 12:16 PM
I'd wear up-dos and compensate with scarves.


Me too-- you've got to get yourself some warmer scarves!

Naiadryade
December 30th, 2012, 01:20 PM
Wow Canadians, you really know how to get it done! Thanks! How would you recommend wearing your hair under all that fabric? In a braid? In a bun that sticks out between the hat and scarves?

raingirl
December 30th, 2012, 02:52 PM
Fur Trapper Hat (https://www.google.ca/search?q=fur+trapper+hat&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&um=1&ie=UTF-8&hl=en&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&ei=RqngULe3L8jo0gGJs4EY&biw=1608&bih=783&sei=SangUKHVEaq90QGrxICgBw)?

Nique1202
December 30th, 2012, 02:55 PM
Wow Canadians, you really know how to get it done! Thanks! How would you recommend wearing your hair under all that fabric? In a braid? In a bun that sticks out between the hat and scarves?

Either way. Whichever is easiest for you. If you plan to put a hat on top of all that, though, a braid of some sort would probably be best as it wouldn't stick out and make it fit oddly.

Chromis
December 30th, 2012, 03:11 PM
Ready for some picture overload? Ya might want to grab a cuppa tea if you have a slow connection

Favourite winter style:
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7155/6776230451_30fd5d221e.jpg
The log roll. Your hair is still too short for this I think, but you might be able to do a French Twist. I never figured them out myself. You can find this style in the articles for instruction. A fairly flat bun like a cinnamon bun with Amish pins should work well and so does a Ficcare braid or a folded braid. Flattish is the key for me under most hats. I do have one that can take anything I throw at it, but I do find I can't really wear a hood if I make the bun too big anyhow.

My favourite hat:
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7156/6776227333_d96da83cff.jpg
Best reason to learn how to knit ever. I love this hat. I'm wearing it hear to show the degree of slouch. It's not rasta sized, but much roomier than a beanie. I never wear it like this in real life though!

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7175/6776233467_125636ac40.jpg
I have to admit, it does make a bulge in the back, but my ears are all covered and so is my hair.

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7155/6776243825_3e6f22ebdd.jpg
And it looks pretty cute still from the front! (The pattern here is called Guinan btw)

If you can find or make even poofier hats, you can eliminate most of the bulge even!
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7199/6857225437_5fa6f8e4aa.jpg
This pattern is the Russula Tam. Very, very roomy. Again just showing this for comparison.

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7193/6857205065_6af990edaa.jpg
And this is how I normally wear it, with bonus chicken! Hi Camilla! I made this one as a fall/spring hat so I could actually have a matching set of something for once :lol:

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8073/8327440466_dc5ca1f0f4.jpg
And as a proof of concept shot, this is a picture I took once just after I'd walked home and then shoveled snow. Double scarves and there is a Calorimetry under a slouchy toque.

Chromis
December 30th, 2012, 03:17 PM
Oh, and one more to add...

I personally have the best luck in simply making sure my hats fit over my hair. Look at the difference otherwise:
http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2687/4120765406_c453cb69c0.jpg
I know they are hard to see, but look at those poor chilly earlobes all exposed! Brrrr.... Plus the whole hat wants to skootch upwards leaving my forehead more exposed too. When I put the hat fully over the hair, I am all covered and warm! AT least until there is a super chilly wind :lol:

Maelyssa
December 30th, 2012, 07:03 PM
Oh, and one more to add...

I personally have the best luck in simply making sure my hats fit over my hair. Look at the difference otherwise:
http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2687/4120765406_c453cb69c0.jpg
I know they are hard to see, but look at those poor chilly earlobes all exposed! Brrrr.... Plus the whole hat wants to skootch upwards leaving my forehead more exposed too. When I put the hat fully over the hair, I am all covered and warm! AT least until there is a super chilly wind :lol:

I have absolutely no clue how to knit but this hat alone has made me add it to the bucket list of things to do in2013. Thanks so much Chromis for sharing!

vanillabones
December 30th, 2012, 09:38 PM
It is SO cold in MA right now. I wish I had longer thicker hair to keep me warm lol. I love my pompom hat that covers my ears, it is the warmest. And it may not be very warm but I have seen others on here suggest lining the inside of you hat with silk or satin to protect your hair from damage, matting, tangling, rubbing etc.

Chromis
December 30th, 2012, 10:29 PM
I have absolutely no clue how to knit but this hat alone has made me add it to the bucket list of things to do in2013. Thanks so much Chromis for sharing!

Yay! Do eet! Knitting is quite fun and I like having something to do with my hands when I watch movies or nature documentaries or whatnot. Plus I can make myself things that I'd have a hard time finding to buy in stores :D

Maelyssa
January 5th, 2013, 12:28 PM
Yay! Do eet! Knitting is quite fun and I like having something to do with my hands when I watch movies or nature documentaries or whatnot. Plus I can make myself things that I'd have a hard time finding to buy in stores :D

Any suggestions to start learning? Youtube videos or anything?

Chromis
January 5th, 2013, 02:16 PM
Any suggestions to start learning? Youtube videos or anything?

I learned mostly from a Susan Bate's Learn to Knit kit that had crappy aluminum needles and a paperback kids book that was simply awesome. I can't find the name of it now of course... I didn't have internet access when I was teaching myself but YouTube is great too and so is knittinghelp.com

My biggest bits of advice for beginners:
- Get some wooden or bamboo needles. They don't cost much extra and they are much easier than those slippery metal ones!
- Get smooth yarn, hopefully with some or all wool in it. Don't get mohair or loopy eyelash yarn to start because it will be hard to see what you are doing. Paton's Classic is perfectly nice yarn to start with and comes in loads of colours. Unless you are really truly strapped, it is worth spending a dollar extra to get yarn that won't make you tear your hair out. If you like something nicer and it isn't novelty yarn, grab it! Variegated and stripey yarns are pretty fun since you can watch the colours change.
- Start off by making a couple of little squares. Knit a square with all knit stitch, then one of all purl stitch, and then a stockinette one. Then you don't have to cast on a ton of stitches when you mess up the first couple of rows and you don't have to feel as perfectionist about mistakes ;)
- My best tip if you'd like to learn to knit but you are strapped for cash is that the library is your friend and so are other knitters. Most of us have stash yarn laying around! We are often pretty happy to share. I know I buy more than I need for a given project so that I won't run out. When someone announces they want to learn, I always offer them yarn!

Chromis
January 5th, 2013, 02:19 PM
Oh and also! That particular hat is very easy pattern and would make a great first hat once you've got the hang of knitting a few sample squares. (If you have a cat, those little sample squares make great toys if you fold them and then sew them into little kitty wontons, just stuff with yarn and/or catnip.)

chen bao jun
January 5th, 2013, 02:49 PM
What I've been doing with my hair so far this winter is putting it in a satin sleep cap and then pulling a regular hat over it to hide the sleep cap. Then I wrap a scarf around neck--there is no hair to get in the way but the hair is keeping my head warm as sort of a 'layer' inside my sleep cap and wool hat.
Hair is awesome for keeping a person's head warm. I have thick type 3c/4a hair and my head is NEVER cold in winter, nor my ears either because of it. and the longest it has ever been is bra strap. But it only has to be shoulder length to keep me very warm in a hat. the denser curls seem to keep it warmer--I've never understood the theory of evolution that states that more tightly curly hair 'evolved' to keep people's heads cooler in Africa. My hair does not keep me cool at all--in fact in the summer, I have to braid it up completely out of the way to avoid heat stroke (and headaches from being too warm). But in the winter its the greatest thing. I was knitting top down hats for orphans in the Ukraine and someone with type 2a hair had to tell me to get rid of the little hole on top, because people with this hair type would get cold air seeping in though the hole, while in my case, I've never had to worry about this--my hair blocks off any air coming through the hole on top very effectively.
I also don't 'get' why they say lighter skin 'evolved' for cold climates, when its very dark-skinned people (Eskimos) who live where its coldest and---but I'm off topic, sorry.
Maybe a snood inside your coat would also help to keep you warm? I haven't tried this but it seems like a snood would protect you hair AND keep it down for warmth...

Nique1202
January 5th, 2013, 03:01 PM
I also don't 'get' why they say lighter skin 'evolved' for cold climates, when its very dark-skinned people (Eskimos) who live where its coldest and---but I'm off topic, sorry.

As far as I can remember, Native Americans actually came over from Asia some 10 000 or more years ago (either on a land bridge by foot or a nutrient-heavy seaweed bridge on boats, depending who you ask). Asia being more temperate, their natural selection was for darker skin over the previous tens or hundreds of thousands of years. They haven't been in the colder climates long enough to have natural selection work to make their natural skin tone lighter. White-skinned people generally come via the northern part of Europe, where skin had to be lighter to allow more vitamin D production. Even people native to the Mediterranean (Italians, Greeks) often have noticeably darker skin than people from, say, Finland.

June
January 6th, 2013, 06:50 AM
I always wear my hair up in winter, frozen strands and friction isn't good... With my current short hair, I put it in a folded braid or French roll type thing, then a thin silk bacaclava/ski mask, then a knitted or windstopper fleece hat with ear flaps (is also low in the back, so protects neck). Add scarf and possibly a mock turtleneck thing in wool ( like this: http://kauppa.ruskovilla.fi/tuote/53 )

BTW the silk ski masks come in black only, and cost around 2USD locally, so I'm more than happy to send some out (they fit in an envelope) if you can't find them. Just let me know here (or pm when I get enough posts to be allowed it) and I'll mail you one (free)

Maelyssa
January 6th, 2013, 07:09 PM
I learned mostly from a Susan Bate's Learn to Knit kit that had crappy aluminum needles and a paperback kids book that was simply awesome. I can't find the name of it now of course... I didn't have internet access when I was teaching myself but YouTube is great too and so is knittinghelp.com

My biggest bits of advice for beginners:
- Get some wooden or bamboo needles. They don't cost much extra and they are much easier than those slippery metal ones!
- Get smooth yarn, hopefully with some or all wool in it. Don't get mohair or loopy eyelash yarn to start because it will be hard to see what you are doing. Paton's Classic is perfectly nice yarn to start with and comes in loads of colours. Unless you are really truly strapped, it is worth spending a dollar extra to get yarn that won't make you tear your hair out. If you like something nicer and it isn't novelty yarn, grab it! Variegated and stripey yarns are pretty fun since you can watch the colours change.
- Start off by making a couple of little squares. Knit a square with all knit stitch, then one of all purl stitch, and then a stockinette one. Then you don't have to cast on a ton of stitches when you mess up the first couple of rows and you don't have to feel as perfectionist about mistakes ;)
- My best tip if you'd like to learn to knit but you are strapped for cash is that the library is your friend and so are other knitters. Most of us have stash yarn laying around! We are often pretty happy to share. I know I buy more than I need for a given project so that I won't run out. When someone announces they want to learn, I always offer them yarn!

Thank you so much for the advice! What a fun project to start.:D