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Thread: The Cadogan Braid

  1. #1
    Member skay's Avatar
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    Default The Cadogan Braid

    I'm slowly trying a few new updos.

    As a I was reading a book, I came across something called a "Cadogan Braid".

    Google results:

    Not much out there.

    However, it seems that, in general, it is something that is attached to the main hairstyle.

    ---------------------------------------------------
    Example (though it refers to a wig rather than a braid):

    http://www.maisonsaint-gabriel.qc.ca...5a_c18_02.html

    Cadogan wig
    The cadogan wig was a small pad of rolled hair. This fake chignon was tied to the person’s real hair with a ribbon.

    ---------------------------------------------------

    However, the entry in the book I was reading makes it sound like something totally different. See quotation below.

    Book: Emily Climbs
    Author: L.M. Montgomery. This is the author of the Anne of Green Gables series. (If you loved that series you'll love this particular "Emily" series as well!)

    Quotation from the book:

    "Emily, with skirts a fraction longer and her hair clubbed up so high in the "Cadogan Braid" of those days, that it really was almost "up", was back in Shrewsbury for her Junior year..."

    --------------------------------------------------

    Does anyone know what this Cadogan Braid is??

    In the above quotation, it sounds pretty intriguing!

  2. #2
    Practically Tidal Wavelength's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Cadogan Braid

    I love the Emily series.

    I looked it up once, but it was awhile ago so I can't remember the site offhand. IIRC it was another name for the French braid. So my guess from the quotation was that she braided her hair in a French braid and tucked the tail under. Therefore it wouldn't have been what they'd call "up" exactly, but it would have been "almost up".

    Not sure that's correct but it made sense, to me at least.
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    Default Re: The Cadogan Braid

    I have been reading about this recently: in French it is the "catogan" (meaning = male hairdo with a pigtail and ribbon). I am yet to see it though! May be these?
    http://www.cfa.ilstu.edu/lmlowel/THE.../Menreview.htm

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    Default Re: The Cadogan Braid

    Quote Originally Posted by Diamondbell View Post
    I have been reading about this recently: in French it is the "catogan" (meaning = male hairdo with a pigtail and ribbon). I am yet to see it though! May be these?
    http://www.cfa.ilstu.edu/lmlowel/THE.../Menreview.htm
    That's not a braid though...
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    Default Re: The Cadogan Braid

    *blink* maybe that's a regional thing, but pigtail=braid when I grew up. It meant a single, fairly short braid like you'd see on a periwig, but pigtail def. meant a braided tail.

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    fightin' in satin tights Kuchen's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Cadogan Braid

    I think the French explanation makes sense. A catogan might not have been a braid when men wore it in one century, but when women wore it at a later period, they would have had to braid in order not to have loose hair.

    Incidentally, random fact, a Cadogan teapot is one which is filled from underneath. It's attributed to Lord or Lady Cadogan, so I expect it took just one misunderstanding or mishearing to transform the Catogan style into a Cadogan, and another step to braid the pig tail.

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    fightin' in satin tights Kuchen's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Cadogan Braid

    Oh no! I wrote a long reply about catogan and cadogan and cadogan teapots and now it's lost. I think the Frenc explanation is best - a simple corruption turned it from catogan to cadogan. And a lady would have avoided loose hair, hence it became a braid.

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    Default Re: The Cadogan Braid

    Someone needs to tell Jessica Simpson about this ... I think she believes she "invented" hair extensions!

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    Default Re: The Cadogan Braid

    My DBF, who's a eighteenth-century freak, always wears his APL hair in a low ponytail, held by a black silk ribbon he calls, in french, Catogan. There's an article on the french Wikipedia that seems to make order in the ideas that were brought here, let's see if I can translate it properly:

    Le catogan est un noeud utilisé pour attacher les cheveux en une coiffure ramassée sur la nuque. Par extension, il désigne une coiffure où les cheveux sont attachés et ramassés sur la nuque. Le mot fut créé au xviiie siècle, à partir de Cadhogan, nom du général et comte anglais qui mit cette coiffure à la mode.
    Au xviiie siècle, en Europe, le catogan semble avoir la forme d'une queue de cheval basse, très courante chez les soldats, les domestiques...
    En Asie, très porté et ses sens sont très divers.
    Actuellement, le mot catogan est plutôt utilisé pour désigner une sorte de large chignon bas.


    The Catogan in a knot used to tie hair into an updo brought togheter on the nape. By extension, it can refer to that updo. The word was created in the eighteenth century, from Cadhogan, name of the English general and count that brought this hair setting into fashion.
    In the eighteenth century, in Europe, the catogan seems to have the shape of a low ponytail, very common among soldiers, servants...
    Nowadays, the word catogan refers mostly to a kind of wide low bun.

    HTH!

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    Default Re: The Cadogan Braid

    Oops I forgot a line! It says: In Asia, very common and its meanings are various. (It doesn't make much sense in French neither, actually...)
    So what I suppose about the catogan braid, and what I saw on historical reconstitution weekends, is men who braid their (APL to BSL) hair and tie it with a catogan in a bow. I don't think adult women would wear their hair in a braid out of home at that time, rather in a coiffe or a more elaborate updo.

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