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Changling
November 22nd, 2011, 08:21 AM
I live in Maine, and it has pretty much already decided to be winter here. It drops below freezing every night, the air is suddenly very dry, and my hair does not appreciate it at all. It's in a jawline bob at the moment ;_; and I can't seem to keep it from getting all static-y and sticking up in every direction! And it clings all over my face. And I know it's not from a change in my routine, because I haven't changed my routine in over a month. AND I know it's not from dryness, because I wash twice a week, and by wash day it's all heavy with sebum and whatever, and really greasy and needs to be washed, but somehow still all static-y! Though I suppose it's a *little* more manageable on wash day...but it's way too greasy to be publicly acceptable!

This is especially a problem for me with trying to grow my hair out long. I have been trying to grow out this pixie for five years! And every time it gets long enough to be in my face, I start to go more and more insane until I get another pixie! And I don't even like them! They are a pain in the butt to style. It's been long enough to be in my face for like, 3 months now. And that's right where it is, all the time. I have *no* experience whatsoever with "bobby pins" or "hair clips" (did I say that right? ...jk XD) because I may as well have been a boy until I was like...18.

Once I can make a ponytail, it will be out of my face and I can benign neglect it until it's nice and long and I can do braids and buns and all manner of truly awesome things with it. But I have to remain sane and find a good hiding place for the scissors until then!

TL;DR: my hair is so static-y and unmanageable I am in danger of cutting it and crying myself to sleep every night.

PrairieRose
November 22nd, 2011, 08:28 AM
@Changling...what kind of comb or brush do you use? I also have a problem with static in the winter. I recently started using a horn comb, this seem to cut down on the static greatly.:happydance:

SpinDance
November 22nd, 2011, 08:33 AM
What is your routine, what products do you use? I get static a lot when I use ACV rinses and also I've had some with oil shampoo. When I do CO or CWC I don't get it. As PrairieRose says, horn combs are supposed to help. I didn't notice any difference after doing ACV/oil shampoo, but then I haven't completely debugged my process with using these. Oh, and oil applied to the static-y hair didn't help me, just gave me oily static-y hair. Putting some oil or Panacea on wet hair seemed to reduce it, though.

Changling
November 22nd, 2011, 08:36 AM
omg...it's super cheap and *plastic* Gee I wonder where all that static could possibly be coming from? Surely not my cheap-as-hell plastic comb! I feel dumb now. I'm a science major, for pete's sake.

But where can I get a horn comb? I live in rural Maine...the only stores that even sell combs are like....Rite Aid and Walmart DX

Changling
November 22nd, 2011, 08:39 AM
What is your routine, what products do you use? I get static a lot when I use ACV rinses and also I've had some with oil shampoo. When I do CO or CWC I don't get it. As PrairieRose says, horn combs are supposed to help. I didn't notice any difference after doing ACV/oil shampoo, but then I haven't completely debugged my process with using these. Oh, and oil applied to the static-y hair didn't help me, just gave me oily static-y hair. Putting some oil or Panacea on wet hair seemed to reduce it, though.

I do use BS/ACV rinses to wash my hair, but I really really like it...I don't wanna stop! D:
I guess I could go back to CO...I do have no-cone stuff. Do you think it would help if I replaced the ACV with beer or something? I got really good results from beer rinses before. But it wasn't winter then.

ktani
November 22nd, 2011, 08:41 AM
What is your routine, what products do you use? I get static a lot when I use ACV rinses and also I've had some with oil shampoo. When I do CO or CWC I don't get it. As PrairieRose says, horn combs are supposed to help. I didn't notice any difference after doing ACV/oil shampoo, but then I haven't completely debugged my process with using these. Oh, and oil applied to the static-y hair didn't help me, just gave me oily static-y hair. Putting some oil or Panacea on wet hair seemed to reduce it, though.

In the past, I have had static after using conditioner.

I have found with catnip use it is the balance of the moisture level of my hair in part and making sure I use the catnip evenly - result - ETA: should read minimal to 0 static - 0 to no static.

That is the key - using enough oil in the oil shampoo and the shampoo not being drying (using too strong a shampoo with the oil) - or using a bit more oil on damp hair afterward, if necessary. Covering damp oiled hair with plastic and using a blow dryer for 5 minutes can help the coconut oil absorb thoroughly and not make the hair look greasy.

Neya
November 22nd, 2011, 08:43 AM
When I lived in Maine my hair was long and super staticy in winter.
I attributed it to dry air + being over moisturized.
I personally just used to dose it in cones - but then I knew nothing about hair care then.

Anje
November 22nd, 2011, 08:45 AM
Try switching to a horn or wood comb -- less static than plastic.

Consider getting a humidifier and/or a little mister bottle with water. Mist your hair periodically. Static tends to have to do with dryness -- not that your hair is dried out, but your environment probably is. When the relative humidity drops really low (as it tends to indoors in winter, especially with forced-air heating), hair and clothes get a lot statickier.

It doesn't take dried out hair for it to be affected by static electricity. (http://blog.taser.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/Van-de-Graaff-generator.jpg)

PrairieRose
November 22nd, 2011, 08:47 AM
omg...it's super cheap and *plastic* Gee I wonder where all that static could possibly be coming from? Surely not my cheap-as-hell plastic comb! I feel dumb now. I'm a science major, for pete's sake.

But where can I get a horn comb? I live in rural Maine...the only stores that even sell combs are like....Rite Aid and Walmart DX
I ordered mine off the internet...some are very expensive, others are reasonable in price. I think I bought mine from www.heavenlyharvestinc.com

Changling
November 22nd, 2011, 08:47 AM
Try switching to a horn or wood comb -- less static than plastic.
Consider getting a humidifier and/or a little mister bottle with water. Mist your hair periodically. Static tends to have to do with dryness -- not that your hair is dried out, but your environment probably is. When the relative humidity drops really low (as it tends to indoors in winter, especially with forced-air heating), hair and clothes get a lot statickier.


So do you think dryness is the culprit? I have a humidifier in my room, and I do have a mister bottle but I could use it more than I do. Any suggestions on a good mister bottle recipe for winter static? I usually just use filtered water (I have hard water, so I wash my hair with filtered water) and like, a drop of conditioner.

Anje
November 22nd, 2011, 08:50 AM
Yes, I think it's the dry air. Winter static is a pretty well-known phenomenon for longhairs.

Your mister recipe is probably already good. A little moisture combats static well, if somewhat temporarily. (I've been known to splash large amounts of water on the super-staticky polyester pants I had to wear for some Christmas performance.)

I've also heard of people running drier sheets over their hair. I haven't tried it myself, but that might help reduce it.

ETA: If you're weird about animal products, The Body Shop in the US has a really nice wooden comb.

Amber_Maiden
November 22nd, 2011, 08:51 AM
Have you tried using aloe? It helps smooth down static, I find.

ktani
November 22nd, 2011, 08:53 AM
Dryness is a contributing factor, not the cause of static. Wet down a staticky skirt for example, and static disappears until the skirt is dry.

However, spray a static spray on a dry skirt and static disappears too.

It is about "lubrication". That does not mean clothes need to be greasy, just coated and lubricated. Fabric softeners are oily and waxy. The wax is less important in this case.

I had a container of fabric softener refill expire and separate. It oozed oil from the container.

ETA: coconut oil has other fatty acids in it (than lauric acid) in small quantities like stearic acid which is waxy but in that quantity is easily washed out unlike the amounts in conditioner that build-up.

Changling
November 22nd, 2011, 09:03 AM
Oh wow, I am TOTALLY asking my mum for a madora comb for the winter solstice ^__^ I just happened upon them in a google search. I don't really have nice things, and it is a very nice thing.

ktani
November 22nd, 2011, 09:10 AM
Oh wow, I am TOTALLY asking my mum for a madora comb for the winter solstice ^__^ I just happened upon them in a google search. I don't really have nice things, and it is a very nice thing.

That will definitely help.

You may also want to consider clarifying your hair (build-up causes dryness) and using a lighter conditioner and a milder shampoo. You can pretty much use any very light oil in a small amount on your hair like camellia oil to not have it look greasy, on damp hair to help as well.

Changling
November 22nd, 2011, 09:16 AM
That will definitely help.

You may also want to consider clarifying your hair (build-up causes dryness) and using a lighter conditioner and a milder shampoo. You can pretty much use any very light oil in a small amount on your hair like camellia oil to not have it look greasy, on damp hair to help as well.

I use BS/ACV rinses to wash my hair, and it's been working really well for me until now. I don't want to stop, but I will try some other methods to see if I can find something else I like that results in less static.

Amber_Maiden, I have some aloe but I haven't used it yet...I experimented with my mister bottle recipe a bit, and found that aloe and my no-cone conditioner literally do not mix (it kind of looked like snow lol). Should I make a spray bottle of aloe water? Or maybe use it on my hair right after a shower, like a hair product? I have no experience with aloe (I'm a noob).

ktani
November 22nd, 2011, 09:19 AM
I use BS/ACV rinses to wash my hair, and it's been working really well for me until now. I don't want to stop, but I will try some other methods to see if I can find something else I like that results in less static.

Ah, that is fine and you do not have to stop what you are doing. Just use a milder dilution of the baking soda - which will be less drying.

ETA: You can also follow the baking soda wash with a well diluted lemon juice rinse, which can help keep some moisture in your hair, while at the same time help prevent frizz, and static to a degree. It is about how well you dilute that too - in this case more as opposed to less.

Changling
November 22nd, 2011, 09:29 AM
Ah, that is fine and you do not have to stop what you are doing. Just use a milder dilution of the baking soda - which will be less drying.

ETA: You can also follow the baking soda wash with a well diluted lemon juice rinse, which can help keep some moisture in your hair, while at the same time help prevent frizz, and static to a degree. It is about how well you dilute that too - in this case more as opposed to less.

I am currently using 1tsp BS to one cup water (I have pretty short hair, so very little is needed), and 1/4 cup ACV to 3/4 cup water. Is lemon juice equivalent to ACV, in that the same proportions would yield similar results? Or is it more/less acidic?

ktani
November 22nd, 2011, 09:36 AM
I am currently using 1tsp BS to one cup water (I have pretty short hair, so very little is needed), and 1/4 cup ACV to 3/4 cup water. Is lemon juice equivalent to ACV, in that the same proportions would yield similar results? Or is it more/less acidic?

It is the same pH used straight as straight vinegar but needs more dilution to get it to be a hair friendly pH.

Experiment with adding more water to your baking soda wash and to keep the baking soda from being abrasive, which it can be, fully dissolve it in warm water before using it.

Changling
November 22nd, 2011, 09:44 AM
It is the same pH used straight as straight vinegar but needs more dilution to get it to be a hair friendly pH.

Experiment with adding more water to your baking soda wash and to keep the baking soda from being abrasive, which it can be, fully dissolve it in warm water before using it.

Thanks! I'll try that.

ktani
November 22nd, 2011, 09:58 AM
Thanks! I'll try that.

You are very welcome.

holothuroidea
November 22nd, 2011, 10:11 AM
Mix a little bit of aloe into your mister bottle. Aloe dissolves pretty well in water and it might work better than conditioner for you. Don't put too much in because it will make your hair sticky, but this depends on the fineness of your strands.

I would decrease the ACV in your rinse. You can try other acids, too, as Ktani mentioned like lemon juice and tea. Tea is my personal favorite and the pH is very close to your scalp's normal pH.

Until you get your super special comb, you could probably stop using the plastic one and detangle with your fingers. I like to rub a drop of oil (I use jojoba with rosemary) into my hands and I flip my head upside down and work my fingers through my hair until there are no more tangles.

Hope this helps :)

ktani
November 22nd, 2011, 10:16 AM
Mix a little bit of aloe into your mister bottle. Aloe dissolves pretty well in water and it might work better than conditioner for you. Don't put too much in because it will make your hair sticky, but this depends on the fineness of your strands.

I would decrease the ACV in your rinse. You can try other acids, too, as Ktani mentioned like lemon juice and tea. Tea is my personal favorite and the pH is very close to your scalp's normal pH.

Until you get your super special comb, you could probably stop using the plastic one and detangle with your fingers. I like to rub a drop of oil (I use jojoba with rosemary) into my hands and I flip my head upside down and work my fingers through my hair until there are no more tangles.

Hope this helps :)

There is nothing wrong with using tea in general as a rinse instead of conditioner. It is acidic.

However, for applications like using it after something alkaline, like baking soda, diluted lemon juice or vinegar is better and more acidic, in my opinion.

holothuroidea
November 22nd, 2011, 10:25 AM
There is nothing wrong with using tea in general as a rinse instead of conditioner. It is acidic.

However, for applications like using it after something alkaline, like baking soda, diluted lemon juice or vinegar is better and more acidic, in my opinion.

True. I hadn't thought of that. I suppose you could just put a squirt of lemon juice in it.

Also, there's a difference between bottled lemon juice and getting the juice fresh out of a lemon. My hair hates bottled juice, the only thing I can think of that makes it different is the preservatives although logically I don't see why it makes a difference but IME it does.

ktani
November 22nd, 2011, 10:32 AM
True. I hadn't thought of that. I suppose you could just put a squirt of lemon juice in it.

Also, there's a difference between bottled lemon juice and getting the juice fresh out of a lemon. My hair hates bottled juice, the only thing I can think of that makes it different is the preservatives although logically I don't see why it makes a difference but IME it does.

It depends on the bottled juice. There are differences between brands. In the lemon rinse thread, some people did notice a difference between fresh and bottled while others did not, as I recall.

heidi w.
November 22nd, 2011, 11:53 AM
Static electricity often occurs in hair because the available humidity indoors is actually fairly dry, or free of moisture.

How's your skin and nose/throat doing by the morning? Dry too?

To help with the problem, consider running a humidifier at night right near the bed. I do, in winter. I know a woman who runs one all year round in her Florida home; even in summer's intense humidity!

I took this tip from Lady Grace, who is relatively unknown on LHC. She has magnificent hair. She used to have something around 8 feet of hair length, and cut it back, and last I heard it was near classic length again. She is an older woman, like myself, and experiences phenomenol growth. She's just one of those lucky people, plus she's done a lot of research on how to grow hair.

But the humidifier thing makes a huge difference. I've even recommended its use to non-longhaired folks, and they even like it. IF your apartment or house is overly dry, consider running a humdifier at night near the bed, and put one in a larger community area where people tend to be a lot, such as the kitchen (which is even drier because people are cooking and heating up the room, sucking up moisture out of the air).

I'm betting this will help a bit.

Then otherwise, really take care to condition the hair when washing, and in snowy/freezing winter, up the temperature of the wash water so the uptake of conditioner works better. A lot of people use too cool of water. Conditioner works better when the hair cuticles are more "open" or "lifted" and emulsifies and is absorbed a bit better when it's a bit slurrier. Conditioner is intended to work by bonding with hair's cortex, and you need warmer water to get to the cortex. Also product can be too cool and kind of stand on top of the hair rather than absorbed by the hair if the water is too tepid. I have to warm the hair over&over, warm the conditioner product, and warm the conditioner once applied to my hair's length to get it to emulsify and thereby be absorbed, before rinsing it out.

I also recommend coconut oil for use on dry skin. Very helpful.

heidi w.

Changling
November 22nd, 2011, 04:46 PM
Static electricity often occurs in hair because the available humidity indoors is actually fairly dry, or free of moisture.

How's your skin and nose/throat doing by the morning? Dry too?

To help with the problem, consider running a humidifier at night right near the bed. I do, in winter. I know a woman who runs one all year round in her Florida home; even in summer's intense humidity!

I took this tip from Lady Grace, who is relatively unknown on LHC. She has magnificent hair. She used to have something around 8 feet of hair length, and cut it back, and last I heard it was near classic length again. She is an older woman, like myself, and experiences phenomenol growth. She's just one of those lucky people, plus she's done a lot of research on how to grow hair.

But the humidifier thing makes a huge difference. I've even recommended its use to non-longhaired folks, and they even like it. IF your apartment or house is overly dry, consider running a humdifier at night near the bed, and put one in a larger community area where people tend to be a lot, such as the kitchen (which is even drier because people are cooking and heating up the room, sucking up moisture out of the air).

I'm betting this will help a bit.

Then otherwise, really take care to condition the hair when washing, and in snowy/freezing winter, up the temperature of the wash water so the uptake of conditioner works better. A lot of people use too cool of water. Conditioner works better when the hair cuticles are more "open" or "lifted" and emulsifies and is absorbed a bit better when it's a bit slurrier. Conditioner is intended to work by bonding with hair's cortex, and you need warmer water to get to the cortex. Also product can be too cool and kind of stand on top of the hair rather than absorbed by the hair if the water is too tepid. I have to warm the hair over&over, warm the conditioner product, and warm the conditioner once applied to my hair's length to get it to emulsify and thereby be absorbed, before rinsing it out.

I also recommend coconut oil for use on dry skin. Very helpful.

heidi w.

I have a humidifier in my room, and my nose and throat haven't been dry but my skin (especially my hands) has.

It kind of sounds like even if I can tame the static in my own home, it'll just come right back the minute I go outside :(

jacqueline101
November 22nd, 2011, 05:05 PM
I used to take a dryer sheet and rub over my hair to kill the static electricity.

Melisande
November 22nd, 2011, 05:27 PM
Humidifier is great. Besides, I have such a tendency to get static electricity that sometimes I'm afraid to touch things. I always keep a little mister bottle handy, filled with distilled water, rose water, aloe vera gel and a drop of almond oil. From time to time, I swish a bit onto my hair and also hands. (In summer, I use the very same bottle to spray on my clingy skirts...)

This is the only thing that really helps me. My husband says that if he hooked up a generator to me, we'd save tons of money on electrity...

Changling
November 27th, 2011, 06:39 AM
This is the only thing that really helps me. My husband says that if he hooked up a generator to me, we'd save tons of money on electrity...

I am also a really good conductor of electricity...if you couldn't guess ;_; my parents used to have this VCR I was always afraid to touch, because it zapped me EVERY TIME! No one else, either. Just me. I remember my high school chemistry teacher was a good conductor, too - so good that he refused to ever touch the Van de Graaff during demonstrations - he always used a wooden meterstick to turn it on and off XD

@jacqueline - I've heard of that, and I'm quite positive it works, but I don't want to do it because of the not-so-good-for-you stuff dryer sheets are made of. I used to have strange rash-like skin problems from using dryer sheets on my clothes.

I've switched to CO for now, because I do have a no-cone conditioner I like ok, and my hair really seems to need the moisture right now. It has been a big help, but I'm going to have to use my mister bottle more too, I think. Thanks for all the help, everyone! :D

holothuroidea
November 27th, 2011, 11:28 AM
Along the same idea as dryer sheets- I use vinegar in the winter time to reduce static in laundry. Maybe you could spray a washcloth with a dilute vinegar solution and wipe your hair down with it to reduce the static. It might not work but maybe it's worth a shot? The vinegar smell should dissipate as it drys, but as a bonus you could put a hair friendly EO in the mix.

heidi w.
November 27th, 2011, 03:41 PM
Oh wow, I am TOTALLY asking my mum for a madora comb for the winter solstice ^__^ I just happened upon them in a google search. I don't really have nice things, and it is a very nice thing.

You can order it straight from a George Michael salon, such as the one in New York or Ohio. You pay shipping: about $25.00 total.

http://madoralonghairheaven.com/madoraprod1.html

Scroll down more than halfway to view combs nearer the bottom of the webpage. I'm on the PRODUCT page. The GM salon in New York, Manhattan is known as the "Madora" salon.

heidi w.

heidi w.
November 27th, 2011, 03:42 PM
Along the same idea as dryer sheets- I use vinegar in the winter time to reduce static in laundry. Maybe you could spray a washcloth with a dilute vinegar solution and wipe your hair down with it to reduce the static. It might not work but maybe it's worth a shot? The vinegar smell should dissipate as it drys, but as a bonus you could put a hair friendly EO in the mix.

NEVER, EVER place ANY form of vinegar directly on the hair. It MUST be diluted, well-diluted and then rinsed out. That's why it's named a "rinse".

heidi w.

holothuroidea
November 27th, 2011, 04:11 PM
NEVER, EVER place ANY form of vinegar directly on the hair. It MUST be diluted, well-diluted and then rinsed out. That's why it's named a "rinse".

heidi w.

Do you have any particular reason for this reaction? It seems kind of harsh. I said diluted. I usually dilute my vinegar 1:10. (ETA: I also didn't say to put it directly on the hair). I certainly didn't intend to suggest anything harmful so if you have found this to be harmful please tell us why.

I would welcome any information that would inform me as to why my suggestion could be wrong, but I don't appreciate the "yelling" without any substantiation. Usually your posts are so informative.

Changling
November 28th, 2011, 07:35 AM
Along the same idea as dryer sheets- I use vinegar in the winter time to reduce static in laundry. Maybe you could spray a washcloth with a dilute vinegar solution and wipe your hair down with it to reduce the static. It might not work but maybe it's worth a shot? The vinegar smell should dissipate as it drys, but as a bonus you could put a hair friendly EO in the mix.


NEVER, EVER place ANY form of vinegar directly on the hair. It MUST be diluted, well-diluted and then rinsed out. That's why it's named a "rinse".

heidi w.


Do you have any particular reason for this reaction? It seems kind of harsh. I said diluted. I usually dilute my vinegar 1:10. (ETA: I also didn't say to put it directly on the hair). I certainly didn't intend to suggest anything harmful so if you have found this to be harmful please tell us why.

I would welcome any information that would inform me as to why my suggestion could be wrong, but I don't appreciate the "yelling" without any substantiation. Usually your posts are so informative.

please don't fight :(

I already use a diluted vinegar rinse on my hair to level the pH of baking soda for washing, but I switched back to CO because I was having dryness. My static issue seems resolved as of now, but I'm going to try lowering the concentration of BS and upping the concentration of ACV to see if I can get the same results that way. Because dilute ACV feels sort of slippy and conditioning in my hair. Or should I reduce BOTH concentrations? :confused:

ktani
November 28th, 2011, 07:55 AM
Both baking soda and apple cider or any regular vinegar (not pickling vinegar for instance, which has a higher acetic acid content) can be drying. Both can be diluted well to not be drying.

There are people here who leave vinegar rinses in their hair. I see no point to that but no one has reported damage from doing so, that I am aware of or have seen in posts. The pH of vinegar is about 2.3 straight. That can be damaging to hair over time. Diluting it raises the pH.

ETA: Pickling vinegar would need much more diluting not to be drying than regular vinegar.

I wrote an article on vinegars, http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/vbjournal.php?do=article&articleid=184

ETA: 2 - I do not recall seeing any post of vinegar used straight on hair. I believe there has been at least one post of someone using it straight on their scalp. I would not recommend that but it was reported I think to relieve a scalp issue.

I clean with white vinegar to remove calcium deposits and soap scum from porcelin. I just pour it straight on my scrubber with liquid soap. The scubber has a handle. When I have accidently gotten straight vinegar on my skin it can "burn" but no harm was done. I would not use it straight on hair.

holothuroidea
November 28th, 2011, 08:07 AM
No fighting. :) I just want to know why she was so against it and also just standing up for myself a bit, no hard feelings.

Everyone's hair is different. BS/ACV is difficult because you need to find the right ratios for you. I use a very dilute vinegar concentration because it is really difficult to rinse out of my hair and I feel like it leaves a little bit of a film. So just experiment and find out what works for your hair.

If you're having dryness then using less BS is the way to go but you don't need to also increase your vinegar. If the concentration of vinegar you are using feels slippy and conditioning and rinses out well then that's probably the right concentration for you.

I'm glad your static issue seems to have resolved. :)

Changling
November 28th, 2011, 11:12 AM
I think what I'm going to do is give my hair a week or two break, just do CO washes for a bit. Then I'm going to try halving my BS concentration and keep the ACV the same. I will post my results here once I do so in case anyone is interested in my little experiment.

Also: I have stopped using my plastic comb. I suspect this was a source of much of my static problem (it was nicely sanded, so it wasn't catching on my hair or anything, but plastic is just so staticy I switched to finger-combing until I can get a nice Madora comb).

holothuroidea
November 28th, 2011, 12:11 PM
Sounds like a plan! I can't wait to hear how it works out. :)

Changling
December 10th, 2011, 09:04 AM
Well, I just tried my BS/ACV rinse again the other day, and I cut the amount of BS, but kept the ACV the same, and here are my findings:

I didn't get the horrible dryness I had before, but then this was only the first wash after a couple weeks of CO, so I should reserve judgement on that for now. I didn't have crazy static, either, but the static was worse than when I CO'd. However, my mister bottle now has double (cone-free) conditioner in it, and I've been using that more often, and it seems to really be helping to keep my hair not dry and not staticy. I'll post again after another few BS/ACV rinses to account for the transition period (from CO to rinsing).

ktani
December 10th, 2011, 09:15 AM
I just posted this, http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?p=1899625#post1899625

Life is about timing, lol.

bloomingrose
December 10th, 2011, 10:30 AM
I know that this is a temporary fix... But when my hair has a lot of static, I pat it down with a dryer sheet and it makes it go away. I usually keep one in my pocket in the winter. :)

Changling
December 10th, 2011, 01:34 PM
@ ktani - Well, hell! I've been using mineral oil on my skin in the winter for three years! I love the stuff - just recently started wondering if maybe it isn't so good for my skin. Glad to see that issue laid to rest! It would be easy as anything to incorporate mineral oil into my routine. Thanks for the info! :D

ktani
December 10th, 2011, 01:40 PM
@ ktani - Well, hell! I've been using mineral oil on my skin in the winter for three years! I love the stuff - just recently started wondering if maybe it isn't so good for my skin. Glad to see that issue laid to rest! It would be easy as anything to incorporate mineral oil into my routine. Thanks for the info! :D

Well hell! You are very welcome, lol. I have written about its safety when cosmetic grade mineral oil is used but this is a whole new ball game.

Changling
December 11th, 2011, 11:40 AM
Mix a little bit of aloe into your mister bottle. Aloe dissolves pretty well in water and it might work better than conditioner for you. Don't put too much in because it will make your hair sticky, but this depends on the fineness of your strands.

How much aloe should I use? Like just a little drop in a 4 oz (~120mL, 1/2 cup) bottle? Or like, a 1:4 ratio? I just bought a second mister bottle, then I realized I had no idea what proportions I should use XD

ktani
December 11th, 2011, 12:24 PM
@ ktani - Well, hell! I've been using mineral oil on my skin in the winter for three years! I love the stuff - just recently started wondering if maybe it isn't so good for my skin. Glad to see that issue laid to rest! It would be easy as anything to incorporate mineral oil into my routine. Thanks for the info! :D

The baby oil has been working well here, http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showpost.php?p=1899753&postcount=76
without stickiness and aloe can build-up on hair and has for people here.

The amount of mineral oil needed is a few drops only and it is antistatic. It should not need to be reapplied and should wash out with shampoo easily. It like any oil can be a problem to wash out if it is overused.

ETA: It was used on damp hair and in this case, no conditioner was used.

ETA: 2 http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showpost.php?p=1897730&postcount=45

ETA: 3 It will vary as to what people prefer and can use or not, as to whether they can use the baby oil or mineral oil alone, or use conditioner first.

Changling
December 11th, 2011, 03:13 PM
I actually want to use the aloe as a sort of less-damaging hairspray (i don't have a problem using products like mousse, but I just don't like hairspray), like mix it into some water and spray it onto my hair upside down maybe? And let it dry. But I've never used aloe before so I don't know how much to put in.

BlazingHeart
December 11th, 2011, 05:51 PM
When I have really bad problems with static, I find that putting just a little bit - one swipe - of a GOOD beeswax based lip balm on my hands, rubbing them together, and then rubbing them over my hair takes care of it. It's just a tiny bit of beeswax, so it doesn't seem to build up, but it's enough to calm things down. My favorite for this has beeswax, some kind of butters (not shea, but I can't remember what), and aloe.

I totally hear you on the dryer sheets, Changeling. We're trying to lower bad chemicals in my household right now because I've started reacting to things (and a friend who has multiple chemical sensitivity says my symptoms were what she ignored years ago, before she was full-blown). Have you looked at 7th Generation dryer sheets? They're supposed to be a lot safer. I can't remember the other brand that has been suggested to me as not containing all the nasty things typical dryer sheets have.

julya
December 11th, 2011, 06:36 PM
When I was growing out my pixie cut, I used gel all the time, until it was long enough for a pony tail. I think it did damage my hair in the long run, but it really helped me to get through the awkward stages.

Changling
December 12th, 2011, 08:53 AM
When I have really bad problems with static, I find that putting just a little bit - one swipe - of a GOOD beeswax based lip balm on my hands, rubbing them together, and then rubbing them over my hair takes care of it. It's just a tiny bit of beeswax, so it doesn't seem to build up, but it's enough to calm things down. My favorite for this has beeswax, some kind of butters (not shea, but I can't remember what), and aloe.

I totally hear you on the dryer sheets, Changeling. We're trying to lower bad chemicals in my household right now because I've started reacting to things (and a friend who has multiple chemical sensitivity says my symptoms were what she ignored years ago, before she was full-blown). Have you looked at 7th Generation dryer sheets? They're supposed to be a lot safer. I can't remember the other brand that has been suggested to me as not containing all the nasty things typical dryer sheets have.

I love suggestions of alternate uses for stuff :) I Bath and Body Works Body Butter for my feet, and for dry winter skin, and sometimes after putting it on my hands, I run my fingers through my hair a little bit (it has jojoba butter in it, among other things), and as long as I use a little bit, it's great for my ends and general dryness. I use a good hemp-beeswax lip balm, so I'll have to try that out.

About dryer sheets, I switched to a free & clear kind a while ago, so it doesn't have any dyes or scent, and I have noticed an improvement in my skin dryness/irritation, but I bet it would be EVEN BETTER if I switched to 7th generation (I use their dish soap, it's great). I often don't even use dryer sheets at all, because I'm afraid of my skin getting all dry and itchy. So I should really invest in those.

Changling
January 6th, 2012, 09:37 AM
Ok, I have fixed my static problem. I now BS (1/2 tsp to one cup water) & ACV(1/4 cup to 3/4 cup water) wash my hair once a week, and CO (no-cone) once a week. After I wash it, I just squeeze it a little to get extra water out - I don't towel-dry. I put a towel over my shoulders to catch drips. I spray my hair all over with my (cone-free conditioner, dragon's blood EO, and filtered water) mister-bottle. Then I make tiny braids all over for my current style (crimped. kinda.). I spray with the mister bottle again when I'm done braiding. I let it dry completely, (sometimes sleep with the braids in), then un-braid for a ridiculous amount of volume and texture. Every day I do a scalp massage, and about every three days I BBB. I never use my plastic comb anymore, I finger-comb. My hair gradually goes from crimped to straightened somehow. There is never any static.

I am in heaven :D

ladyshep
January 6th, 2012, 10:03 AM
Cool Beans! Glad to hear no more static for you!

Since we are on the subject of static and I don't want to start a new thread, why do cones seem to make my hair so staticy? Does this go with other people as well? I have told Several hairdressers this, and they act surprised.

Changling
January 6th, 2012, 09:54 PM
Cool Beans! Glad to hear no more static for you!

Since we are on the subject of static and I don't want to start a new thread, why do cones seem to make my hair so staticy? Does this go with other people as well? I have told Several hairdressers this, and they act surprised.


Well, for me the static was a problem of plastic/electronics/wool and dryness. After I stopped putting static-y things on my head (wool hat, plastic comb, desktop computers XD ), I still had a bit of static until I solved the dryness problem by stretching my washes and keeping my hair well-moisturized.

I have heard that cones apparently can lock moisture out of your hair (?), so this may be giving you a dryness problem, hence static.

btw, even when my hair was super oily and needed a wash badly I still had static before. So it may also have to do with getting good oil distribution, which, if cones are locking the natural oils out of your hair, could be the problem.

white.chocolate
January 20th, 2012, 04:41 AM
Cool Beans! Glad to hear no more static for you!

Since we are on the subject of static and I don't want to start a new thread, why do cones seem to make my hair so staticy? Does this go with other people as well? I have told Several hairdressers this, and they act surprised.

I used a no-'cone shampoo and then a 'cone conditioner. I observed really static hair. I'm assuming that I got the results correctly as I tried to keep everything else constant. I ditched the conditioner, and now I'm looking for a conditioner that will work. The problem is, I have a really tight budget these days and the shops I've looked at don't seem to be giving free samples or in tiny packages. :(