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View Full Version : Alternatives to air drying?



Hirsutist
April 18th, 2011, 03:10 PM
Walking around with damp hair is a surefire method to get sick, as I've come to realize. No matter what I try to combat the problem - drinking hot tea, exercising, wearing too many clothes - I can't keep my core body temperature up with damp hair in this less-than-warm weather. Any alternatives without having to resort to blow drying or rubbing it dry with a towel?

louisemg82
April 18th, 2011, 03:13 PM
Hmmm.... I guess if you have to go out, wear a nice warm hat. Sorry it's not much but I also like to stay away from heat and there are precious few alternatives :(

kyandii
April 18th, 2011, 03:14 PM
You could use a fan? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omGqvaDVGTo

However I wrap an old tee-shirt around the ends of mine and let it dry that way, no heat or rubbing.

firicia
April 18th, 2011, 03:16 PM
I have not been using my blow dryer but I do know it has a "cool" setting where it just using the room temp air and blows it. That would make it dry faster although it might cause a few more tangles, but if it's making you sick it might be worth it?

I do remember hearing something about a special towel some people here use, but hopefully someone who knows more will respond about that.

Druid of Alba
April 18th, 2011, 03:18 PM
I was just going to suggest a fan, too.

Wavelength
April 18th, 2011, 03:24 PM
Wet hair shouldn't make you sick, unless your immune system's already compromised by something else (i.e. lack of sleep, poor diet, etc). I always air-dry and I live in a cold climate.

Or just change the time when you wash your hair so that you have enough time to air-dry indoors, where it's warm. I take most of my showers in the evening just after supper, and my hair's nearly dry by bedtime.

alwayssmiling
April 18th, 2011, 03:26 PM
Now the weather is warmer here, I've been washing my hair in a morning and drying it as I'm driving - fan on a slow, cool breeze turned towards my face. Very time saving!

Firefox7275
April 18th, 2011, 03:35 PM
Wet hair shouldn't make you sick, unless your immune system's already compromised by something else (i.e. lack of sleep, poor diet, etc). I always air-dry and I live in a cold climate.

Or just change the time when you wash your hair so that you have enough time to air-dry indoors, where it's warm. I take most of my showers in the evening just after supper, and my hair's nearly dry by bedtime.

Agree with this: colds and flus are viral infections, wet hair alone is not a predictor. I air dry indoor and outside year round and I can't remember my last respiratory infection. :confused:

Hirsutist have you been checked by your doctor for a circulation problem? Or are there any issues with your diet that might affect your immune system or ability to keep warm? Exercising is a temporary solution, since once you start sweating you may overcool. If you are sitting around one of the cheapest and most effective ways to keep warm is a heated under or overblanket - they use about as much power as a lightbulb and save me putting on the heating even in wintry weather.

spidermom
April 18th, 2011, 03:43 PM
Wet hair shouldn't make you sick, unless your immune system's already compromised by something else (i.e. lack of sleep, poor diet, etc). I always air-dry and I live in a cold climate.

Or just change the time when you wash your hair so that you have enough time to air-dry indoors, where it's warm. I take most of my showers in the evening just after supper, and my hair's nearly dry by bedtime.

I agree with this. There's really no link between wet hair and getting sick. I always leave the window open at my side of the bed no matter the temperature and usually wash my hair just before bedtime. I think I get sick less often than the average person.

But you can blow dry on warm and cool if you don't want to spend long hours with wet hair. As long as you aren't pulling/stretching the hair too hard or using too hot a setting, this should be just fine. Remember, blow down the hair shaft from top to bottom to avoid frizz.

RitaCeleste
April 18th, 2011, 03:48 PM
I live in a warmer climate my hair is porous so if wash it in the evening when the heater is on, its dry by bedtime. You could turban it if doesn't hurt your neck and see if that keeps you warmer? I usually eat a higher protein, fat diet and make sure I have plenty of iodine in my diet to keep cold hands and feet warm. I get results from better fuel for my body, not so much from heaters and such. My old trailer has no real insulation left, its nice and drafty. I just crawl under a blanket.

Allar
April 18th, 2011, 06:06 PM
I see that many people alredy suggested it, but I think that wrapping a towel around your head, wearing a cap or putting whatever you like around your head should be a good method to help you hair to dry while keeping your head warm and not dissipate body heat.

Blow drying with cool air is good too, if it doesn't give you the same heat problem you have with cold air.

By the way, I'd suggest you give a look at the oil shampoo thread, this method should also give, besides other benefits, a shorter drying time, so maybe it could be helpful for you.

julliams
April 18th, 2011, 07:06 PM
Those microfirbre towel turbies are really good, but I find that I need about two or three if I'm to leave them on my head because even with a good squeeze, I make them totally wet in about 4 minutes. I think if you wear warm clothing and put on some super warm wooly socks, go through a couple of turbies for the first 30 minutes and then let your hair mostly airdry for the next hour or two, you can throw it in a bun for the rest of the time which should keep the cool length off your back. The top actually dries pretty fast considering alot of heat is lost through the top of your head, so once that part is dry it should be fine.

I have honestly never gotten sick from airdrying my hair. Are you prone to head-colds?

Mesmerise
April 18th, 2011, 07:27 PM
Honestly, air drying your hair shouldn't make you sick unless your immune system is compromised in some way (as others have said). Flus and colds are caused by a virus, and whether you catch a virus or not shouldn't depend on whether your hair is wet or dry.

However, it's not always pleasant to be out in cold weather with wet hair! I have never dried my hair with a hairdryer (well not NEVER but not ever regularly). What I think I would do is either wash it earlier and let it air dry (mostly) while still inside, or wash it at night so it will be dry in the morning, or if I had to - get a hairdryer that has a completely cool setting (mine has warm and hot only!).