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View Full Version : Never trimmed -vs- trimmed hair tip : which is strongest ?



Sweetness
March 15th, 2010, 03:31 PM
I always wonder about this when I S & D and find new hair growing with the natural "pointy" tip (and not yet as long as my hemline).

I have this feeling that trimmed hair might actually be more prone to splits and that I should wait for this hair to be the same length as my hemline to trim the end...

But I also have this urge to trim them, for an obscure reason, to a flat and freshly cut end...


So, question is : which is more resistant to damage and splits ? Natural pointy end or trimmed one ?

Do you ever trim/dust your "perfectly healthy" never trimmed growing hair ?

Any opinions about this ??

Arctic_Mama
March 15th, 2010, 03:35 PM
Huh. That's a good question. It does seem that my tapering new hair is actually more split-prone, and a clean blunt end from sharp scissors hardly ever splits on me... So completely anecdotally, by experience says that a blunt, cut end fares better with my fine hair than a natural tapering point.

Who knows what the truth is, though?

Hana
March 15th, 2010, 03:39 PM
i havent seen a pointy tip on my hair........ ever, i think.
i have always like my ends blunt, and I S&D that way, too.

thinking about it, i should imagine a pointy tip is marginally weaker because its thinner.
like a piece of thread is stronger than a spider web. although that could be rubbish.

*shrugs*
interested to know what others think, though!

Sweetness
March 15th, 2010, 03:43 PM
Huh. That's a good question. It does seem that my tapering new hair is actually more split-prone, and a clean blunt end from sharp scissors hardly ever splits on me... So completely anecdotally, by experience says that a blunt, cut end fares better with my fine hair than a natural tapering point.

Who knows what the truth is, though?

My theory was a somewhat about the "triangle shape" being stronger than the strait one (in general) ... and the fact that the hair cortex is totally "hidden" inside the naturally pointy growing new hair... and not if the tip is cut off....

Don't hair split mostly when the cortex is exposed and the cuticle is incomplete / damaged / broken / eroded / weaken, etc. ?


http://www.dayza.com/Users-Photos/1268689907.jpg (http://www.dayza.com/file/Users-Photos/1268689907.jpg/1.html)


But then again, I have NO IDEA what the truth is about this either.

As its really difficult to trim them with regularity (as those new hair grow everywhere...), I'd really like to know if giving them a blunt cut is actually a very bad idea or a great one ... :confused:


(of course, not talking about the hemline itself, which is easy to keep blunt and in perfect condition with regular care... nor the damage in shorter hair, which of course has to be cut off to enable the hair to get longer and stop the "breaking off vicious cycle" )

spidermom
March 15th, 2010, 04:03 PM
It doesn't seem to matter. I get as many splits on untrimmed hairs as I do on trimmed hairs.

ravenreed
March 15th, 2010, 04:12 PM
Pound for pound, spider silk is extremely strong. I bet if you made thread out of it, it would be far superior to regular thread... but I get your point.


i havent seen a pointy tip on my hair........ ever, i think.
i have always like my ends blunt, and I S&D that way, too.

thinking about it, i should imagine a pointy tip is marginally weaker because its thinner.
like a piece of thread is stronger than a spider web. although that could be rubbish.

*shrugs*
interested to know what others think, though!

Sweetness
March 15th, 2010, 04:35 PM
This is a commercial cosmetic study on chemical hair treatments & surface damaging and may not apply to "clean healthy trimming" at all, but it's all I found so far ...


"(...) hair with exposed cortex is more susceptible to abrasion/erosion in the presence of SLS than hair containing intact cuticle.


(…) These results show that the cuticle is more resistant than the cortex to the degradative effects of abrasion/erosion, especially in the presence of SLS (...) Such an effect is also consistent with the known greater resistance of the cuticle to alkali solubility (...)

(...) It was also demonstrated that hair with exposed cortex is more susceptible to protein loss by surfactants than hair with an intact cuticle. (...)"




SUKHVINDER S. SANDHU and CLARENCE R. ROBBINS, "A simple and sensitive technique, based on protein loss measurements, to assess surface damage to human hair", Technology Center, Colgate Palmolive Company, j. Soc. Cosmet. Chem., 44 (May/June 1993), pages 172-174




Still intrigued about the hair tip per se ...

Sweetness
March 15th, 2010, 04:47 PM
Oh and another question too ; do you cut hair strands "strait" or "diagonal" ?
Which do you think is least prone to damage ?

Sorry for all the questions :oops:

Hana
March 15th, 2010, 05:50 PM
Pound for pound, spider silk is extremely strong. I bet if you made thread out of it, it would be far superior to regular thread... but I get your point.

i know that if spider web were the same size as a piece of wire, it would be infinitely stronger, but i mean in comparison to how it actually is.

i suppose it would be more accurate to compare wire to thread.

LaurelSpring
March 15th, 2010, 05:56 PM
I subscribed to this thread because now I am just sooo curious to find out if there is an answer to this question. :drama:

walterSCAN
March 15th, 2010, 05:58 PM
Oh and another question too ; do you cut hair strands "strait" or "diagonal" ?
Which do you think is least prone to damage ?

Sorry for all the questions :oops:


As far as I know, cutting 'straight' (flat, blunt, 90 degree angle, etc) is less prone to damage. Specifically, I seem to recall that hair that has been razored (which usually means it has been cut more diagonally) tends to get splits more readily.

No worries about the questions, that's what LHC is for!

ETA--> With regard to the original question: My intuition says that uncut ends would be stronger than cut, just because the hair's integrity hasn't been compromised yet. However, like the other posters here, I'm just guessing. I'd love to know definitively.

christine1989
March 15th, 2010, 06:12 PM
I have tons of those pointy new hairs too and I like to snip them off whenever I find one. Since neither my blunt ends or pointy ends split, I assume it dosen't make much difference.

Yozhik
March 15th, 2010, 07:18 PM
I've been wondering about this, too (recently gone on a S&D binge).
I'd also go with my gut feeling that untrimmed hair ends are less prone to breaking, but they do look awfully thin, and sometimes I succumb to the urge to trim :o

I definitely would not cut diagonally, though -- that would expose a huge amount of the inner cortex, which in my mind is inviting a split :)

Igor
March 15th, 2010, 07:32 PM
Personally I have observed that the hairs that grow to the full length is the thickest/coarsest and those that are shorter are finer
The thicker hairs seem to be naturally stronger and therefore grow to the full length with less damage
Even if you canít observe any structural differences, you might have some hairs that grows stronger and to the full length without damage

Sweetness
March 16th, 2010, 11:48 AM
Interesting insights all of you ! If someone ever finds the official answer, do tell us :)

enfys
March 16th, 2010, 12:49 PM
Since I only trim split ends I can't say.

If I see a split I trim it, but can't say what the end was like before it split. Was it an end that was previously cut for layers? Or a sealed end that had caught up? Fairytailing on my layers means it's impossible to tell.

I don't see any need to cut unsplit ends, if they are blunt or pointy unless I'm trimming my ends. I won't single out ends that are healthy.

princessp
March 16th, 2010, 01:28 PM
this is a really interesting thread. i tended to think that trimming helps w/ spilt ends but now i'm not so sure ...:drama:

LadyJennifer
March 16th, 2010, 01:33 PM
Oh and another question too ; do you cut hair strands "strait" or "diagonal" ?
Which do you think is least prone to damage ?

Sorry for all the questions :oops:

I've read that cutting on diagonal is a bad idea because it exposes more of the internal cortex, and everything cut on a diagonal is weaker anyway (think of a ribbon cut on diagonal, how it frays more than one cut straight).

DMARTINEZ
March 16th, 2010, 01:37 PM
Ive always trimmed these pointy hairs,but after reading this,IM leavin them alone!!!! ;)


Deb

Anje
March 16th, 2010, 03:54 PM
Interesting question.

Personally, those pointy new-growth hairs drive me nuts, because it seems takes an inch or two of growing before the follicle figures out how to put out a more robust hair that that it doesn't want to make curly hairs after all. So my new growth curls and is fairly flimsy, knotting easily and generally sticking out. For me, perhaps a properly-trimmed hair is better. But I'm not about to start S&Ding all the new growth out. If it's not split, I don't cut it in S&D.