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*Elvina*
March 9th, 2008, 05:14 AM
Hey, I wanted to know if anyone has experience with this. My hair is bsl, which I don't consider as very long but I know hairdressers do. And yes, I know it's bad for your hair but i've been thinking about it for a long time now. I have 1c/2a hair and I'd like to be 2c. They always say a perm doesn't last in long hair but what if you only do the ends orso? or leave out the crown? Could anyone give me some information on this?:)

eadwine
March 9th, 2008, 05:41 AM
Have you tried other methods yet, like plunking/plopping or rag curling? Just wondering since those are hair friendly methods, and if it is only the ends it should work.

FrannyG
March 9th, 2008, 06:14 AM
My knee-jerk response is to say don't perm your hair. While the curls will fall away in time, your hair is permanently altered. If you colour your hair at all, you're in for double damage.

Having said that, I have had perms with fairly long hair in the past, and I quite enjoyed them. However, that was before I was committed to long hair, so it didn't bother me that I needed to cut my hair quite a bit as the perm faded

If you really feel you must get a perm, just for the experience of it, please bear in mind that ultimately you will need to cut off that previously permed hair. There really is no way of keeping post-permed hair damage-free. Eventually there will be breakage, fuzzy ends, and lots of splits.

The bottom line is, it's your hair and you need to be happy with it, but I'd think long and hard before getting a perm. Please give it at least two weeks of thought.

In the meantime, perhaps you could try some other methods of getting curls. Pin curls, rag curls, bun waves and plopping are just some of the things you could try.

The most important thing I've learned here at LHC is to embrace my hair type. I fought against it for years, but now I'm in a place where I appreciate my fine, straight hair, and I see its beauty.

I wish you the best whatever you decide. :flower:

WavyGal
March 9th, 2008, 09:36 AM
My knee-jerk response is to say don't perm your hair. While the curls will fall away in time, your hair is permanently altered. If you colour your hair at all, you're in for double damage.

Having said that, I have had perms with fairly long hair in the past, and I quite enjoyed them. However, that was before I was committed to long hair, so it didn't bother me that I needed to cut my hair quite a bit as the perm faded

If you really feel you must get a perm, just for the experience of it, please bear in mind that ultimately you will need to cut off that previously permed hair. There really is no way of keeping post-permed hair damage-free. Eventually there will be breakage, fuzzy ends, and lots of splits.

The bottom line is, it's your hair and you need to be happy with it, but I'd think long and hard before getting a perm. Please give it at least two weeks of thought.

In the meantime, perhaps you could try some other methods of getting curls. Pin curls, rag curls, bun waves and plopping are just some of the things you could try.

The most important thing I've learned here at LHC is to embrace my hair type. I fought against it for years, but now I'm in a place where I appreciate my fine, straight hair, and I see its beauty.

I wish you the best whatever you decide. :flower:


Frannyg is right. Ultimately it is up to you with what you want to do, but I agree with her on not perming. Get a perm not only damages your hair, but if you have fairly straight hair with a slight wave or to, a perm will take more work than expected. I can't tell you how many times I have seen straight or even wavy haired people get perms and still think they can treat them like their own natural hair. Then they get frustrated because they weren't expecting to do so much work. A perm has to be treated like naturally curly hair. Plus perms can, even today, go wrong. Lots of times they will either come out too tight or the curls won't hold. I would also agree that you should learn to work it with your own hairtype. Why? Because it's beautiful. You will never be happy if you try to get everything you don't have. Once you buy into that method, you will put yourself in a spot where you will have to buy every "miracle" product on the market. Not only is that expensive, that won't make you feel better.

What I suggest is to wait two weeks before doing anything. Often when we are in a bad mood/having a bad hair day, we want to do something drastic with our hair. On my bad hair days it's tempting for me to straighten it. But then I quickly remember how much of a pin it is for me to straighten my hair. Often you'll find that when you are in a better mood, you will be glad that you didn't do anything drastic. If you still want a perm, DO your research and GET a test strand done to make sure if you hair can handle the chemicals. Only go to a hairstylist with experience, otherwise you are just guaranteeing yourself disastrous results.

Good luck in doing whatever you decide to do.

blondecat
March 9th, 2008, 09:45 AM
I've had 2 wash and wear perms over a long period. [long time ago]
They both took well to the hair and grew themselves out over a couple of years.

I had problem with them knotting constantly and trying to corksrew back onto themselves [like dredlocks] And had to keep the hair plaited for a time.

My hair is a very fine and thin type 1b/ 2a

Perming did cause a lot of dammage.

Carolyn
March 9th, 2008, 09:51 AM
I have your same hair type. I haven't had a perm in years but I've had them at various times in my life. A perm is a chemical change to the hair. I never once had a perm completely fall out or go away. The permed hair was always wavier and a different texture than my newer unpermed hair. Do you think you could trust a stylist to just make your ends slightly wavier? I think that's what you are saying you want. I'd be very afraid of my hair coming out too curly and damaged. Consider it very carefully before you do it. If the perm is a disaster are you willing to sacrifice your length?

yogachic
March 9th, 2008, 09:55 AM
Hey, I wanted to know if anyone has experience with this. My hair is bsl, which I don't consider as very long but I know hairdressers do. And yes, I know it's bad for your hair but i've been thinking about it for a long time now. I have 1c/2a hair and I'd like to be 2c. They always say a perm doesn't last in long hair but what if you only do the ends orso? or leave out the crown? Could anyone give me some information on this?:)


I have had bsl length hair since I was in 8th grade, and I have also had spiral perms in my bsl hair since high school. I never really noticed how much they made my hair so dry, but this last one I got over a year and half ago, I really noticed it. Probably because I joined LHC! I will not get another perm...ever, and the Frizz omg! Its horrible. My hair holds a perm until my hair is cut off! So its not true that long hair doesnt hold a perm very long, it does. Way to long in fact. If you decide to perm, you will be stuck with that permed hair for a Long Time.

justgreen
March 9th, 2008, 10:20 AM
I had spiral perms for 15 years. I haven't let those chemicals touch my hair in almost 4 years and I'll never do it again. I've learned to embrace my semi straight hair and love it. It has blessed me with alot of pleasure and more time to spend doing what I like to do, instead of coifing my hair all the time, spending money on hair products and then living with all that damage.

Once again, it's your hair, but I'd wait the 2 weeks out and then decide, especially after looking at all the unpermed hair here.

blue_nant
March 9th, 2008, 11:32 AM
I permed when my hair was hip-length and I was 25 and bored.

I got permed once, which "didn't take" and a few weeks later, was permed by a more experienced person which did take. Problem is that I effectively had a perm on top of a perm = DAMAGE!

I liked my permed hair, except that bugs seemed to like me more (??).

BUT after the honeymoon was over (a year or so?) it took forEVER to grow out, like several years. I'm not even sure that the problems with my ends splitting are not from that hair having been previoiusly permed. I don't know how to tell, really.

Please think about it, try some other methods of wave-ifying your hair.

BTW, it's 20 years later right now. If those ends are still with me, they are at my thighs.

It's one heckuva commitment! Think it over. Good success!

Blueneko
March 9th, 2008, 11:37 AM
Oh, I am anti-perm. It is instant fry damage and so bad for your hair.

I would try the curling suggestions from the other posters first. It should be a last resort, an even then, it is so drying and causes tons of breakage.

addikted
March 10th, 2008, 12:50 AM
Hello, I have permed my BSL hair waaaaaayyyy back in 2000, definitely pre-LHC. As I have fairly straight asian hair, you can imagine the condition of it. Very damaged, dried and tangly. It would only look good if it was loaded up with silicone products which in hindsight did not address the dry hair issue. So I don't recommend it. Especially now that I want to reach classic and not trim. But, I think the perm technology has improved since then, have heard of 'ionic', 'water', 'ceramic' perms which are supposed to be kinder to your hair using less chemicals etc. Go and check those out if you are really interested in perming your hair.

sandrak
March 10th, 2008, 03:14 AM
I don't want to tell you what to do, but I do want to tell you what happened to my hair. I permed back in 2005 and have regretted it ever since. I am still fighting damage on the ends. My hair is fragile and breaks easily. I have spent ALOT of money trying to get my hair in shape. It just doesn't happen. If I was you, I would run as fast as I could away from the perm. Good luck!

Smokie
March 10th, 2008, 05:24 AM
Isn't amla supposed to add a bit of wave? I seem to recall reading something about that over at Henna for Hair (http://www.hennaforhair.com/)... Hmm...

Also, when I permed (Yes, I know I already have very curly hair) I never payed much attention to the quality of my hair. I just wanted it to straighten out a bit and was told by someone that if you continuously comb your hair with perm-chemicals on it, it would relax a bit. This was maybe ten years ago. I was afraid of chemical relaxers and just wanted looser curls anyway (still do! **pouts**) and would do anything to get them. Pretty sure it was quite damaged. Of course, I didn't know what healthy hair felt like then. I'm still not 100% sure as only my 3" of henna-only roots are completely healthy.

k_hepburn
March 10th, 2008, 07:41 AM
I still think back fondly to the time I had my past-bsl hair permed about ten years ago. I had asked them to do it in bigger rollers than the tiny ones they ordinarily use for perms, so the curls turned out all big and natural looking. Simply gorgeous. Since this was the first serious chemical procedure I had ever had done to my hair, I didn't really see any damage at the time either. I loved it.

However, a few months passed and I began to find out what re-growth meant. For some reason I had naively expected the perm to flatten out over time, thus becoming more and more like the hair growing out fresh. But that was definitely not what was happening. Instead I had (and retained) a very clear demarcation line: 1c/2a hair in the roots section, 3c curls for the rest.

So, once I had grown maybe two inches of re-growth I decided to follow the hair-dresser's advice to "get my roots done". After all, the process had worked fine the first time, so why not. So not a good idea. I ended up with totally fried ends. In spite of having gotten a hair cut at the same time as the "refresher perm", the bottom 5 inches of my hair were visibly very badly damaged, frizzy and split ends galore.

Of course, it was now obvious that getting the perm re-done regularly to compensate for the re-growth just wasn't going to be an option. But surely, over time, it was going to straighten out some, right? NO. Basically I was stuck with growing out what was a very visible demarcation line for the next three to four years. That is how long it took. I was still able to compensate some by doing half-ups while the straighter, virgin section of hair was only a few centimeters shor, but when the curly section started somewhere below my shoulders, the look really wasn't very hot.

If someone was to invent a non-damaging perm that could be maintained by getting re-done (and can be re-straightened without damage) I would probably be in for another try. I still remember fondly how good that first perm looked on me (though I guess I did get lucky, and perms can go horribly wrong even on first application). But there's no way I would commit myself to a perm again as long as it means having to grow it out sooner or later (or being prepared to give up most of my length).

Greetings

katharine

Merlin
March 10th, 2008, 10:49 AM
I know I'm always in the minority when I say this, but my wife had her hair permed at almsot bsl for our wedding. The perm took fine and created just the ringlet curls she wanted. They stayed in for ages. Her hair did not crack, dry out, fall apart or look awful. When she cut it to shoulder length three years later it was in the same condition it was before she permed it.

She still has the 'remainder curls' from a perm she had years ago on her hair at shoulder length, it's now much longer and the condition is no different than it is on unpermed hair at that length.

Maybe she's just lucky?

MadPirateBippy
March 14th, 2008, 02:21 PM
I like doing things to make my hair different, but there are ways of doing it without chemical damage.

I'd say, try plopping and the other curly methods for a while, do rag curls for a few weeks, and if you don't like the maintenence that goes into maintaining it, don't go with hair which you can't UN-curly.

Also, if you get good at it, rag curls can be really quick to put in and a great way to protect your hair while you sleep, and they can be fairly quick. That way, if you end up tired of the curls, you can just stop rag curling instead of having to make a big chop.

Magdalene
March 14th, 2008, 02:37 PM
I had perms for about 6 years straight, and the shortest my hair was during that time was waist. If you have very healthy hair and you use the right rollers (I used the LONG ones that make a circle when you fasten them) it can turn out quite well. Make sure they leave the perm solution on long enough. It usually took about 4 hours combined with the wrapping and the solution part.

I didn't really have a problem with a demarcation line with regrowth, because the weight of my hair always pulled the scalp curl flat anyway.

Every once in a while I consider perming again, but the cost is prohibitive, and I do have the option of braidwaves...but I do miss the curls...

vdhendrix
October 28th, 2009, 11:37 PM
yes my mom was never able to grow her hair paist bsl when she permed(it always broke off) that that she has all the perm damage cut off it grows like wildfire

Coriander
October 28th, 2009, 11:43 PM
When I had my first perm, I had about BSL hair. It was a complete disaster. The curls didn't take, but my hair was absolutely altered afterwards.

The second time I had a perm, my hair was between shoulder and BSL. This time, the perm took. Too well. I looked like Orphan Annie.

I had it straightened a few years afterwards because I couldn't take the frizz anymore.

Just my experience. :)

RocketDog
October 28th, 2009, 11:52 PM
I had permed hair twice - once in fifth grade, where the curl fell out in about a week, the second in ninth grade, where the stylist used the wrong size rollers and I had major poodle-poof. My hair was visibly lighter and more 'porous' feeling afterwards, if memory serves. Both times my hair was just brushing my shoulders.

I can relate to wanting 'perfect' curls every day, but there are so many ways to achieve good curl without needing a perm. One way I can coax my unruly-curly hair into more 'coiffed' spirally waves is to part my hair down the middle and curl it into a big roll on each side of my head while it dries. It sets into pretty, super-shiny waves as it dries and you can refresh the waves during the day by running damp fingers through your hair and re-twirling for a few minutes.