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Blueneko
March 8th, 2008, 12:34 PM
I am a big fan of a molasses soak. It is very softening and adds rich low lights to my hair.

1/2 jar molasses
1 tsp olive oil
1 tsp rosemary oil
1 tsp tea tree oil
conditioner to cut down on stickiness

I create a sticky (not runny) paste then apply it to dry hair, double wrap with plastic and soak for no less than 1 hour.

The results are noticeable! Softeness, thickness, rich brown colour.

Marms
March 8th, 2008, 12:40 PM
I may try this today. I need something to take the brassy tones out of my hair.

Morticia
March 8th, 2008, 12:43 PM
Do you mean rosemary eo? Isn't it expensive to use an entire teaspoon?

I'm interested in trying this, but am allergic to tea tree oil.

redbark
March 8th, 2008, 01:30 PM
Err... Where does one purchase molasses? and are they always in liquid form (am guessing yes)?

ktani
March 8th, 2008, 02:49 PM
Blueneko

That looks like a great recipe - in now unavailable LHC threads there were reports of using molasses for darkening hair colour.

I saved this post on honey and molases because I thought that it was so good and I still do. The bolding is mine.

Originally posted by Gladtobemom On Honey and Molasses
Re: Molasses

"I happen to have a friend here today who is a food chemist. He has a PHD in Chemical engineering--actually works for a company that tests all sorts of food and cosmetics for safety (and yes they do test on animals as well).
He had an interesting insight on Molasses vs. Honey
Honey

Pure Honey is an extremely powerful antifungal and anti-biotic. It is also a powerful anti microbial. The only reason honey is pasteurized is that there is an opportunistic mould that can be poisonous that can grow on the surface of honey--this is rare but is a reason to throw out any honey with brown or shiny scum floating on top or at the edges.
It is a a good humectant (attracts moisture) and actually can soften sebum. It can be added to lotions (and is).
There is also a honey essential oil which he says smells great and is hugely expensive. It can clog pores and should be used with care on skin that is sensitive.

He says that honey and natural buttermilk is one of the oldest known hair "conditioners". (buttermilk has virtually all the fat removed but does have the protein and casein which make hair shiny
Honey and milk is not good for hair because the fat in milk is not a good kind for hair (he said it can give hair a rancid smell that won't go away).


-------------------------------


Molasses can be an antibiotic if it has a lot of sulphur in it (some does).
It can be a really bad source of fungus so buy it in small quantities and use fairly soon after cracking the seal on a jar. Not too likely if you buy it in a glass jar.
If you buy it in bulk, make sure it is blackstrap molasses (high in sulphur and other minerals that inhibit microbial growth).
It is a very humectant (more than honey a lot). It will suck the water out of the air. If left out in a humid environment it will actually increase in weight because of this. If applied to dry hair it can actually suck moisture from the hair.

Molasses is historically a very common ingredient mixed with oil for hair treatments. It is less likely to clog pores but can clog them.
There are compounds in molasses that are extracted for their fragrance and used in perfumes, but no EO.

Molasses should never be left in hair and should probably be followed with a rinse that is acidic to remove the mineral coating that it can leave on hair.
In the end I explained CO and SMT.
He said use honey anywhere anytime but rinse if it isn't hugely diluted. It is a good Mange cure.

He said molasses should be used with more care.
-- for CO use at will, just rinse well and maybe ACV rinse (he says 1-2TBL to 1Quart water) - roughly 1 tsp to a cup.
--for SMT use on wet hair only he suggested to mix equal parts of molasses and a good conditioner same suggestion on rinsing (rinse well and ACV or white vinegar)

-he said never add molasses to lotion or bathwater.

--he said that mixed with an fractionated oil it is a super good detangler on wet hair and that this is what dog show people use on long hair dogs like English Sheepdogs. He says that there is a super expensive detangler for dogs that is just these two ingredients and preservative.

--he also said that there are some horse hoof creams that shouldn't be used on human skin[/color] that contain tons of molasses to soak into hooves and keep moisture in them. But that on human nails they can cause fungal growth."
http://archive.longhaircommunity.com/showpost.php?p=807963&postcount=8

jel
March 9th, 2008, 10:31 AM
Blueneko, do you just rinse after the treatment? No shampooing or CO washing needed?

Redbark, molasses is available in health food stores, but also in supermarkets (near honey, maple syrup or baking supplies). It's a similar consistency to honey.

Blueneko
March 9th, 2008, 11:51 AM
Morticia, I tend to over do it on the oils as a rule. My hair drinks oils up. I have thick hair with a tendency to be coarse. So, yes, I am excessive with the oils. :) I have an 8oz bottle that was around $17 from Wholesale Oils on ebay.

jel, I always wash, condition, ACV after any treatments. My hair is very porous and will soak up anything. If I just did a water rinse, I would have molasses and oils stuck in my hair, which would weigh it down. If it is the weekend, though, I will just H2O rinse and let the goodness soak over night.

Cricket
March 9th, 2008, 12:56 PM
Well, I tried this today, but cut the oils in half... my hair likes them, but doesn't drink them up completely. I left it in just over an hour and washed, acv'd, and oiled as per usual. My hair is almost dry, and so far I like the texture.

I still smell like EO, and I normally don't like the smell of tea tree, but the rosemary cuts it down to a bearable level. My hair doesn't soak up a lot of oils, but it does love to hold on to the smell.

Now I just have to do this a couple of weeks in a row and see if there is an overall effect on my colour.

Thanks, Blueneko!

Blueneko
March 9th, 2008, 06:20 PM
I agree with you, Cricket. When I was just using the tea tree oil, I smelled a bit antiseptic for a few days. The rosemary is calming.

Cricket
March 9th, 2008, 08:15 PM
Well, many hours later and I just let my hair out of the bun. The dampness is now gone, and I still love the texture of my hair. The smell is almost completely gone, which is a bit of a bummer, but expected.

Where I recently trimmed... uh, chopped my ends, there isn't much damage at this point, so I'm eager to see if it keep the dryness and splitting to a minimum.

redbark
March 12th, 2008, 01:48 PM
Thank you Jel :flower:

I didn't check this thread until today. I wanted to try it but reading Ktani's post makes me so wary. I would hate it if my hair weren't soaked enough such that the molasses can suck the moisture right out!

Marms
March 12th, 2008, 07:55 PM
My hair was plenty wet when I tried it but the molasses still sucked all the moisture out of my hair. That was 3 days ago and it is still a big frizzy tangly mess. Plus, it still smells like molasses and rosemary. :mad I guess my hair didn't care for it.

jel
March 13th, 2008, 08:27 AM
Well, I used to add molasses to my conditioner and SMT with no problems whatsoever (on the contrary). That was on wet hair, though.

ktani
March 19th, 2008, 02:03 PM
I did not mean to post that as a negative view on molasses - on the contrary - I did not realize that was how it was seen. I did not interpret the information that way at all.

Aside from the fungus warning - molasses, IMO would be excellent for hair. The molasses sucking moisture from the hair is about applying it straight - not in a mix. The SMT warning to wet the hair first? - SMT's do not contain oil.

The bolding I had done was for my own use when I originally saved the post a while ago. That post was reposted by members (aside from me) more than once. I found it helpful - not a warning against molasses use.

My apologies for the confusion.

From Blueneko's results, I would say the oils she uses in those amounts plus the conditioner keep the molasses from having any negative effect and allow it to work only positively - conditioners usually contain a fair amount of water.

Seeing that pic and reading the results - I would say the recipe is definitely a keeper.

A different conditioner might work differently in the recipe - and a vinegar rinse would make a difference too IMO - it does with honey which can cause tangling as well in some cases.

themostsilly
April 6th, 2008, 11:08 PM
I just tried this recipe, but I guess I did something wrong. I put 4 ounces of molases in a cup and then added the oils. I though molases was much thicker for some reason so I didn't think runniness would be a problem, but it was pretty thin. Then I added my conditioner, which I added quite a bit, but not like a whole bottle or anything, and it didn't seem to thicken up any. I didn't want to add too much conditioner since this had made quite a big batch. I wetted my hair since I read it could suck the moisture out, and dipped my hair in the thin mix, rubbed it in,and squeezed out the excess. It is soaking now, but I hope I didn't do anything wrong. I hope the results are good.
As a treatment its kind of annoying since I have it wrapped with plastic wrap and it is kind of drippy. But feels really great on the scalp because of the eo's. I let everyone know my results tomorrow.

lacereza
April 6th, 2008, 11:24 PM
................................

Lizbot
April 7th, 2008, 12:12 AM
Trying this is definitely on my to-do list. Thanks, y'all.

getoffmyskittle
May 11th, 2008, 07:04 PM
Sorry to revive an old thread, but has anyone other than blueneko had success using this for coloring? Also, is there any particular reason for the tsp of tea tree oil (because, my God, I'm imagining the SMELL), or is it just an oil the OP likes?

ktani
May 11th, 2008, 07:22 PM
There were several threads where people reported that molasses darkened their hair.

I just checked the archives, where I had linked to one thread in particular but it was not there.

This is not news - it was reported a few times but this recipe seems to be IMO, one of the best.

I did find one
http://archive.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=17898

and a post on molasses darkening white hair - the link in the post does not work
http://archive.longhaircommunity.com/showpost.php?p=261459&postcount=6

iris
May 11th, 2008, 07:45 PM
and a post on molasses darkening white hair - the link in the post does not work
http://archive.longhaircommunity.com/showpost.php?p=261459&postcount=6
It does if you replace 'forums' (in the link) with 'archive':
http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=10562&highlight=molasses
->
http://archive.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=10562&highlight=molasses

You have to do that for all the links in the archives. If you want to read them, that is :)

Iris

ktani
May 11th, 2008, 07:48 PM
Thanks iris

I forgot that is what you have to do.

Nynaeve
May 11th, 2008, 08:02 PM
Thanks iris

I forgot that is what you have to do.

I forgot as ell, probably because the one time I tried it, it didn't work. Possibly just that one had gone down or something.

ktani
May 11th, 2008, 08:04 PM
I found another thread.
http://archive.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=10562

The post on darkening
http://archive.longhaircommunity.com/showpost.php?p=155113&postcount=9

Nynaeve
May 11th, 2008, 08:14 PM
Hmmm. thanks for the links, it's been a while since I read those. :D
Forgot to mention
Hmmm, if I ever decide to get rid of the natural red highlights in my incredibly dark hair, this sounds like the way, since so many people say coffee is too drying.

ktani
May 11th, 2008, 08:25 PM
Coffee as a gloss was reported to work here without dryness.
http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=1557

Nynaeve
May 11th, 2008, 11:08 PM
Coffee as a gloss was reported to work here without dryness.
http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showthread.php?t=1557

Thanks for the link, I'll subscribe to it just in case I ever decide to do it.

ETA: Haha. turns out I was already subscribed. I don't even remember reading it! :rolleyes:

maryva
September 21st, 2008, 03:41 PM
Is there a reason for the tea tree oil in this mixture? I'm wondering about the strong scent of the tea tree oil. Thanks!

melikai
September 21st, 2008, 11:09 PM
I've tried to darken my ends 3 times now with a molasses and conditioner 1:1 mix and haven't noticed any significant change, just to let people know! :)

I actually like the smell, though you do have to be sure to rinse it out thoroughly.

I also have tried clove rinses twice, and they've made very very slight changes.

maryva
September 21st, 2008, 11:24 PM
Oh, I'll have to try the clove rinse...any specific instructions on how you did it?

I tried my first ever molasses/conditioner 1:1 with a little bit of jajoba and avacado oil mixed in last night. I actually am really liking the results: My hair seems smoother and the color seems slightly richer and warmer. I had never even heard of using molasses in hair until I came to this forum recently.

melikai
September 22nd, 2008, 01:43 PM
maryva - I didn't really do anything too special. I boiled about 4 tablespoons of whole cloves (I imagine the ground cloves would be a nightmare to wash out) in about 2 cups of water until the water seemed really dark. I'd say about 30 minutes or so.

Then I filtered out all the clove bits and used a spray bottle to apply to my dry ends. The only thing is that it was rather messy, and any places I failed to clean up the clove juice from were quite sticky afterwards! I left it in for about an hour, but you could leave it longer.

As I said, it didn't do a ton to darken. I'm wondering if there is a better application method which would make it penetrate better. It certainly makes my hair smell nice for days afterwards!

The molasses and conditioner mix I used, which I applied to wet hair (and once on top of the clove rinse), still seemed to give a fairly golden-brown, which I'm trying to avoid, but I noticed next to no difference with it in any case.
When I did the strand test for the clove rinse, it gave a really nice neutral-ashy light brown. I soaked the strand in a strong clove infusion for a couple of hours though.

I'm probably going to try raspberry leaf next, as I've heard good things! Or I may just buy some semi-permanent colour, lol.

maryva
September 22nd, 2008, 08:45 PM
Thanks -- I'll have to look into the raspberry leaves also...or just buy some hair color. You are too funny...I'm assuming all of these natural remedies are much better for our hair??

melikai
September 23rd, 2008, 04:01 PM
Yes, I'm sure all these natural rinses and things are MUCH better for our hair, but frankly I'm just an impatient bastard! :p

I also don't want to keep spending money I don't have on things that either don't work or I'll have to do every time I wash in order to see any lasting effect. $10 on one box of hairdye that may see me through until most of my ends grow out becomes mighty tempting when you're sitting in a showercap with molasses and conditioner dripping down your face! ;)

Isilme
September 23rd, 2008, 06:16 PM
is molasses and syrup the same thing? I have something that is called dark syrup and it's amazing for my hair. Is it the same thing as molasses? I haven't noticed any darkening with this anyway. Just wanted to know:)
I add a good glob to a whatever conditioner I have.

Bronwyn Grace
September 23rd, 2008, 07:14 PM
I am going to try this! Not tonight, but possibly this weekend. My hair is getting dry, and this sounds like just the thing to give it a boost. :)

Fourleafclover
September 26th, 2008, 11:21 PM
Too cool! I'm going to try this as soon as I can find out where to get the tea tree & rosemary oil!

Aisha25
September 26th, 2008, 11:51 PM
is molasses and syrup the same thing? I have something that is called dark syrup and it's amazing for my hair. Is it the same thing as molasses? I haven't noticed any darkening with this anyway. Just wanted to know:)
I add a good glob to a whatever conditioner I have.
No syrup is different than molasses. The molasses will darken and do what honey does with moisture but the syrup i dont know what that will do.

eaglefeather71
October 27th, 2008, 11:47 AM
My Daughter and I did straight Molassas for just over an hour on Saturday. It was stinky, made a terrible mess on a couple rags, but our hair LOVED it. My hair is very soft and feels stronger, if thats possible. I didn't notice much of a color change at all. We both have very dark brown/black hair. I have "silver" Highlights and she has light brown roots, both of which did not change, but our hair looked "richer" I would
say.

http://i217.photobucket.com/albums/cc104/ckatto71/BagHeads-1.jpghttp://i217.photobucket.com/albums/cc104/ckatto71/MolassasFront.jpghttp://i217.photobucket.com/albums/cc104/ckatto71/MolassasSide.jpg

This is the first time in ages that I blowfried my hair, but it was so nice....I just kept coolshooting it as much as possible so it wouldn't be so harsh.

ktani
October 27th, 2008, 11:49 AM
A vinegar rinse is recommended following a treatment with molasses.

Molasses is reported to be very good for hair.

ktani
October 27th, 2008, 01:01 PM
My Daughter and I did straight Molassas for just over an hour on Saturday. It was stinky, made a terrible mess on a couple rags, but our hair LOVED it. My hair is very soft and feels stronger, if thats possible. I didn't notice much of a color change at all. We both have very dark brown/black hair. I have "silver" Highlights and she has light brown roots, both of which did not change, but our hair looked "richer" I would
say.

http://i217.photobucket.com/albums/cc104/ckatto71/BagHeads-1.jpghttp://i217.photobucket.com/albums/cc104/ckatto71/MolassasFront.jpghttp://i217.photobucket.com/albums/cc104/ckatto71/MolassasSide.jpg

This is the first time in ages that I blowfried my hair, but it was so nice....I just kept coolshooting it as much as possible so it wouldn't be so harsh.

Absolutely gorgeous shine and colour. Your hair and hers (I cannot tell if it is just your hair or both) look fantastic.

ktani
October 27th, 2008, 01:02 PM
I consider Gladtobemom's post on molasses the standard for good information on the topic.
http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showpost.php?p=2128&postcount=5

How I interpret the post.
http://forums.longhaircommunity.com/showpost.php?p=21657&postcount=14

wintersun99
October 29th, 2008, 09:15 PM
I am a big fan of a molasses soak. It is very softening and adds rich low lights to my hair.

1/2 jar molasses
1 tsp olive oil
1 tsp rosemary oil
1 tsp tea tree oil
conditioner to cut down on stickiness

I create a sticky (not runny) paste then apply it to dry hair, double wrap with plastic and soak for no less than 1 hour.

The results are noticeable! Softeness, thickness, rich brown colour.

I should have used the original mix! :cool:

But, I was out of all of the oils so I mixed molasses with conditioner and applied for an hour. Rinsed and followed with a diluted ACV rinse. I noticed no color change, but didn't expect too. However, I had insane scalp itching all night! Was fine by morning. Weird. :(

I've never had that itching problem with honey and conditioner...

mellie
October 30th, 2008, 11:30 AM
Oh sorry to hear that! That's awful!

I wonder if the conditioner reacted with the molasses somehow? Weird!

Sissy
September 27th, 2009, 10:47 AM
Reviving this thread to ask a question. I have been using molasses in my SMT and mixed with conditioners on occasion. I am hoping to achieve darker, more moisturized hair.

I am not sure what sort of molasses is BEST for moisture and hair darkening. You can buy unsulphured, sulphured, or blackstrap molasses and I honestly don't know the difference. I read a bit about it online but from an eating perspective, not a hair application perspective. Can anyone tell me what's best for the hair? I saw on another hair site that the sulphur in molasses may help with growth and that Blackstrap molasses is best for hair treatments, but it gave no rational as to why.

Anyone have an answer?

Thanks in advance.
Sissy